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Title: Immediate breast reconstruction with anatomical implants following mastectomy: The radiation perspective

Abstract

Immediate implant-based breast reconstruction followed by postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is controversial because of the risk of compromised treatment plans and concerns regarding cosmetic outcomes. We evaluated the effects of immediate direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants on the quality of PMRT delivered by 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). In this retrospective, single-institution study, patients who had undergone reconstruction with direct anatomic implant, performed by a single surgeon, received 3D-CRT between 2008 and 2013. For each patient, 2 plans (including or excluding internal mammary nodes [IMN]) were created and calculated. The primary end point was the dose distribution among reconstructed breasts, heart, lungs, and IMNs, and between right and left breasts. Of 29 consecutive patients, 11 received right-sided and 18 received left-sided PMRT to a total dose of 50 Gy. For plans excluding IMN coverage, mean D{sub mean} for right and left reconstructed breasts was 49.09 Gy (98.2% of the prescribed dose) and 48.51 Gy (97.0%), respectively. For plans including IMNs, mean D{sub mean} was 49.15 Gy (98.3%) for right and 48.46 Gy (96.9%) for left reconstructed breasts; the mean IMN D{sub mean} was 47.27 Gy (right) and 47.89 Gy (left). Heart D{sub mean} was below 1.56 Gy for all plans.more » Mean total lung volume receiving a dose of ≥ 20 Gy was 13.80% to 19.47%. PMRT can be delivered effectively and safely by 3D-CRT after direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants, even if patients require IMN treatment.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4]
  1. Radiation Oncology Unit, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)
  2. (Israel)
  3. Statistical Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)
  4. Department of Surgery, Assuta and Herzliya Medical Centers, Ramat Gan (Israel)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22577875
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HEALTH HAZARDS; HEART; IMPLANTS; LUNGS; MAMMARY GLANDS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Ben-David, Merav, E-mail: Merav.ben-david@sheba.health.gov.il, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Granot, Hila, Gelernter, Ilana, and Scheflan, Michael. Immediate breast reconstruction with anatomical implants following mastectomy: The radiation perspective. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.11.002.
Ben-David, Merav, E-mail: Merav.ben-david@sheba.health.gov.il, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Granot, Hila, Gelernter, Ilana, & Scheflan, Michael. Immediate breast reconstruction with anatomical implants following mastectomy: The radiation perspective. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.11.002.
Ben-David, Merav, E-mail: Merav.ben-david@sheba.health.gov.il, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Granot, Hila, Gelernter, Ilana, and Scheflan, Michael. 2016. "Immediate breast reconstruction with anatomical implants following mastectomy: The radiation perspective". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.11.002.
@article{osti_22577875,
title = {Immediate breast reconstruction with anatomical implants following mastectomy: The radiation perspective},
author = {Ben-David, Merav, E-mail: Merav.ben-david@sheba.health.gov.il and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv and Granot, Hila and Gelernter, Ilana and Scheflan, Michael},
abstractNote = {Immediate implant-based breast reconstruction followed by postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is controversial because of the risk of compromised treatment plans and concerns regarding cosmetic outcomes. We evaluated the effects of immediate direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants on the quality of PMRT delivered by 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). In this retrospective, single-institution study, patients who had undergone reconstruction with direct anatomic implant, performed by a single surgeon, received 3D-CRT between 2008 and 2013. For each patient, 2 plans (including or excluding internal mammary nodes [IMN]) were created and calculated. The primary end point was the dose distribution among reconstructed breasts, heart, lungs, and IMNs, and between right and left breasts. Of 29 consecutive patients, 11 received right-sided and 18 received left-sided PMRT to a total dose of 50 Gy. For plans excluding IMN coverage, mean D{sub mean} for right and left reconstructed breasts was 49.09 Gy (98.2% of the prescribed dose) and 48.51 Gy (97.0%), respectively. For plans including IMNs, mean D{sub mean} was 49.15 Gy (98.3%) for right and 48.46 Gy (96.9%) for left reconstructed breasts; the mean IMN D{sub mean} was 47.27 Gy (right) and 47.89 Gy (left). Heart D{sub mean} was below 1.56 Gy for all plans. Mean total lung volume receiving a dose of ≥ 20 Gy was 13.80% to 19.47%. PMRT can be delivered effectively and safely by 3D-CRT after direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants, even if patients require IMN treatment.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.11.002},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 2,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Medianmore » age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.« less
  • Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%),more » IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.« less
  • Objectives: Mastectomy rates for breast cancer have increased, with a parallel increase in immediate reconstruction. For some women, tissue expander and implant (TE/I) reconstruction is the preferred or sole option. This retrospective study examined the rate of TE/I reconstruction failure (ie, removal of the TE or I with the inability to replace it resulting in no final reconstruction or autologous tissue reconstruction) in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2012, 99 women had skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) or total nipple/areolar skin-sparing mastectomies (TSSM) with immediate TE/I reconstruction and PMRT for pathologic stage II to IIImore » breast cancer. Ninety-seven percent had chemotherapy (doxorubicin and taxane-based), 22% underwent targeted therapies, and 78% had endocrine therapy. Radiation consisted of 5000 cGy given in 180 to 200 cGy to the reconstructed breast with or without treatment to the supraclavicular nodes. Median follow-up was 3.8 years. Results: Total TE/I failure was 18% (12% without final reconstruction, 6% converted to autologous reconstruction). In univariate analysis, the strongest predictor of reconstruction failure (RF) was absence of total TE/I coverage (acellular dermal matrix and/or serratus muscle) at the time of radiation. RF occurred in 32.5% of patients without total coverage compared to 9% with coverage (P=.0069). For women with total coverage, the location of the mastectomy scar in the inframammary fold region was associated with higher RF (19% vs 0%, P=.0189). In multivariate analysis, weight was a significant factor for RF, with lower weight associated with a higher RF. Weight appeared to be a surrogate for the interaction of total coverage, thin skin flaps, interval to exchange, and location of the mastectomy scar. Conclusions: RFs in patients receiving PMRT were lowered with total TE/I coverage at the time of radiation by avoiding inframammary fold incisions and with a preferred interval of 6 months to exchange.« less
  • The results of the treatment of 176 patients with early breast cancer, using radiation therapy without mastectomy are reported. The likelihood of local recurrence was 5% for Stage I patients and 7% for Stage II patients. Local control was significantly greater in those patients receiving an iridium implant. The cumulative survival probability at five years is 96% for Stage I and 68% for Stage II. Gross tumor resection with careful reapproximation of the breast tissue and well-placed incisions facilitates the radiation therapy. Homogeneous external beam radiation to the breast and draining lymph nodes (4500 to 5000 rads) and supplemental localmore » radiation to the sites of the primary lesion (in this series using interstitial implantation) are recommended. The frequency of normal tissue complications was low.« less