skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy

Abstract

Radiation treatment requires high accuracy to protect healthy organs and destroy the tumor. However, tumors located near the diaphragm constantly move during treatment. Respiration-gated radiotherapy has significant potential for the improvement of the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion, such as lung and liver tumors. To measure and minimize the effects of respiratory motion, a realistic deformable phantom is required for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a deformable moving lung (DML) phantom, such as simulation, tissue equivalence, and rate of deformation. The rate of change of the lung volume, target deformation, and respiratory signals were measured in this study; they were accurately measured using a realistic deformable phantom. The measured volume difference was 31%, which closely corresponds to the average difference in human respiration, and the target movement was − 30 to + 32 mm. The measured signals accurately described human respiratory signals. This DML phantom would be useful for the estimation of deformable image registration and in respiration-gated radiotherapy. This study shows that the developed DML phantom can exactly simulate the patient's respiratory signal and it acts as a deformable 4-dimensional simulation of amore » patient's lung with sufficient volume change.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Inchoen St. Mary's Hospital College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon 403-720 (Korea, Republic of)
  4. Field Robot R&D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Ansan 426-910 (Korea, Republic of)
  5. Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)
  6. Department of Radiation Oncology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-896 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22577870
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; DIAPHRAGM; IMAGES; IRRADIATION; LIVER; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY; RESPIRATION; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Kim, Jina, Lee, Youngkyu, Shin, Hunjoo, Ji, Sanghoon, Park, Sungkwang, Kim, Jinyoung, Jang, Hongseok, and Kang, Youngnam, E-mail: ynkang33@gmail.com. Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.10.004.
Kim, Jina, Lee, Youngkyu, Shin, Hunjoo, Ji, Sanghoon, Park, Sungkwang, Kim, Jinyoung, Jang, Hongseok, & Kang, Youngnam, E-mail: ynkang33@gmail.com. Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.10.004.
Kim, Jina, Lee, Youngkyu, Shin, Hunjoo, Ji, Sanghoon, Park, Sungkwang, Kim, Jinyoung, Jang, Hongseok, and Kang, Youngnam, E-mail: ynkang33@gmail.com. 2016. "Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.10.004.
@article{osti_22577870,
title = {Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy},
author = {Kim, Jina and Lee, Youngkyu and Shin, Hunjoo and Ji, Sanghoon and Park, Sungkwang and Kim, Jinyoung and Jang, Hongseok and Kang, Youngnam, E-mail: ynkang33@gmail.com},
abstractNote = {Radiation treatment requires high accuracy to protect healthy organs and destroy the tumor. However, tumors located near the diaphragm constantly move during treatment. Respiration-gated radiotherapy has significant potential for the improvement of the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion, such as lung and liver tumors. To measure and minimize the effects of respiratory motion, a realistic deformable phantom is required for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a deformable moving lung (DML) phantom, such as simulation, tissue equivalence, and rate of deformation. The rate of change of the lung volume, target deformation, and respiratory signals were measured in this study; they were accurately measured using a realistic deformable phantom. The measured volume difference was 31%, which closely corresponds to the average difference in human respiration, and the target movement was − 30 to + 32 mm. The measured signals accurately described human respiratory signals. This DML phantom would be useful for the estimation of deformable image registration and in respiration-gated radiotherapy. This study shows that the developed DML phantom can exactly simulate the patient's respiratory signal and it acts as a deformable 4-dimensional simulation of a patient's lung with sufficient volume change.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2015.10.004},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 2,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: The difference between three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) dose is affected by factors such as tumor size and motion. To quantitatively analyze the effects of these factors, a phantom that can independently control for each factor is required. The purpose of this study is to develop a deformable lung phantom with the above attributes and evaluate characteristics. Methods: A phantom was designed to simulate diaphragm motion with amplitude in the range 1 to 7 cm and various periods of regular breathing. To simulate different size tumors, tumors were produced by pouring liquid silicone into custom molds created by amore » 3D printer. The accuracy of phantom diaphragm motion was assessed using calipers and protractor. To control tumor motion, tumor trajectories were evaluated using 4D computed tomography (CT), and diaphragm-tumor correlation curve was calculated by curve fitting method. Three-dimensional dose and 4D dose were calculated and compared according to tumor motion. Results: The accuracy of phantom diaphragm motion was less than 1 mm. Maximum tumor motion amplitudes in the left-right and anterior-posterior directions were 0.08 and 0.12 cm, respectively, in a 10 cm{sup 3} tumor, and 0.06 and 0.27 cm, respectively, in a 90 cm{sup 3} tumor. The diaphragm-tumor correlation curve showed that tumor motion in the superior-inferior direction was increased with increasing diaphragm motion. In the 10 cm{sup 3} tumor, the tumor motion was larger than the 90 cm{sup 3} tumor. According to tumor motion, variation of dose difference between 3D and 4D was identified. Conclusion: The developed phantom can independently control factors such as tumor size and motion. In potentially, this phantom can be used to quantitatively analyze the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion according to the factors that influence the difference between 3D and 4D dose. This research was supported by the Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning of Korea (NRF-2014R1A2A1A10050270) and by the Radiation Technology R&D program through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (No. 2013M2A2A7038291)« less
  • Purpose: Most clinically-deployed strategies for respiratory motion management in lung radiotherapy (e.g., gating, tracking) use external markers that serve as surrogates for tumor motion. However, typical lung phantoms used to validate these strategies are rigid-exterior+rigid-interior or rigid-exterior+deformable-interior. Neither class adequately represents the human anatomy, which is deformable internally as well as externally. We describe the construction and experimental validation of a more realistic, externally- and internally-deformable, programmable lung phantom. Methods: The outer shell of a commercially-available lung phantom (RS- 1500, RSD Inc.) was used. The shell consists of a chest cavity with a flexible anterior surface, and embedded vertebrae, rib-cagemore » and sternum. A 3-axis platform was programmed with sinusoidal and six patient-recorded lung tumor trajectories. The platform was used to drive a rigid foam ‘diaphragm’ that compressed/decompressed the phantom interior. Experimental characterization comprised of mapping the superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) trajectories of external and internal radioopaque markers with kV x-ray fluoroscopy and correlating these with optical surface monitoring using the in-room VisionRT system. Results: The phantom correctly reproduced the programmed motion as well as realistic effects such as hysteresis. The reproducibility of marker trajectories over multiple runs for sinusoidal as well as patient traces, as characterized by fluoroscopy, was within 0.4 mm RMS error for internal as well as external markers. The motion trajectories of internal and external markers as measured by fluoroscopy were found to be highly correlated (R=0.97). Furthermore, motion trajectories of arbitrary points on the deforming phantom surface, as recorded by the VisionRT system also showed a high correlation with respect to the fluoroscopically-measured trajectories of internal markers (R=0.92). Conclusion: We have developed a realistic externally- and internally-deformable lung phantom that will serve as a valuable tool for clinical QA and motion management research. This work was supported through funding from the NIH and VisionRT Ltd. Amit Sawant has research funding from Varian Medical Systems, VisionRT and Elekta.« less
  • Purpose: Most clinically deployed strategies for respiratory motion management in lung radiotherapy (e.g., gating and tracking) use external markers that serve as surrogates for tumor motion. However, typical lung phantoms used to validate these strategies are based on a rigid exterior and a rigid or a deformable-interior. Such designs do not adequately represent respiration because the thoracic anatomy deforms internally as well as externally. In order to create a closer approximation of respiratory motion, the authors describe the construction and experimental testing of an externally as well as internally deformable, programmable lung phantom. Methods: The outer shell of a commerciallymore » available lung phantom (RS-1500, RSD, Inc.) was used. The shell consists of a chest cavity with a flexible anterior surface, and embedded vertebrae, rib-cage and sternum. A custom-made insert was designed using a piece of natural latex foam block. A motion platform was programmed with sinusoidal and ten patient-recorded lung tumor trajectories. The platform was used to drive a rigid foam “diaphragm” that compressed/decompressed the phantom interior. Experimental characterization comprised of determining the reproducibility and the external–internal correlation of external and internal marker trajectories extracted from kV x-ray fluoroscopy. Experiments were conducted to illustrate three example applications of the phantom—(i) validating the geometric accuracy of the VisionRT surface photogrammetry system; (ii) validating an image registration tool, NiftyReg; and (iii) quantifying the geometric error due to irregular motion in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Results: The phantom correctly reproduced sinusoidal and patient-derived motion, as well as realistic respiratory motion-related effects such as hysteresis. The reproducibility of marker trajectories over multiple runs for sinusoidal as well as patient traces, as characterized by fluoroscopy, was within 0.25 mm RMS error. The motion trajectories of internal and external radio-opaque markers as measured by fluoroscopy were found to be highly correlated (R > 0.95). Using the phantom, it was demonstrated that the motion trajectories of regions-of-interest on the surface as measured by VisionRT are highly consistent with corresponding fluoroscopically acquired surface marker trajectories, with RMS errors within 0.26 mm. Furthermore, it was shown that the trajectories of external and internal marker trajectories derived from NiftyReg deformation vector fields were within 1 mm root mean square errors comparing to trajectories obtained by segmenting markers from individual fluoro frames. Finally, it was shown that while 4DCT can be used to localize internal markers for sinusoidal motion with reasonable accuracy, the localization error increases significantly (by a factor of ∼2) in the presence of cycle-to-cycle variations that are observed in patient-derived respiratory motion. Conclusions: The authors have developed a realistic externally and internally deformable, programmable lung phantom that will serve as a valuable tool for clinical and investigational motion management studies in thoracic and abdominal radiation therapies.« less
  • Purpose: MRI has become an attractive tool for tumor motion management. Current MR-compatible phantoms are only capable of reproducing translational motion. This study describes the construction and validation of a more realistic, MRI-compatible lung phantom that is deformable internally as well as externally. We demonstrate a radiotherapy application of this phantom by validating the geometric accuracy of the open-source deformable image registration software NiftyReg (UCL, UK). Methods: The outer shell of a commercially-available dynamic breathing torso phantom was filled with natural latex foam with eleven water tubes. A rigid foam cut-out served as the diaphragm. A high-precision programmable, in-house, MRI-compatiblemore » motion platform was used to drive the diaphragm. The phantom was imaged on a 3T scanner (Philips, Ingenia). Twenty seven tumor traces previously recorded from lung cancer patients were programmed into the phantom and 2D+t image sequences were acquired using a sparse-sampling sequence k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5mm3; acquisition-time=110ms/slice). The geometric fidelity of the MRI-derived trajectories was validated against those obtained via fluoroscopy using the on board kV imager on a Truebeam linac. NiftyReg was used to perform frame by frame deformable image registration. The location of each marker predicted by using NiftyReg was compared with the values calculated by intensity-based segmentation on each frame. Results: In all cases, MR trajectories were within 1 mm of corresponding fluoroscopy trajectories. RMSE between centroid positions obtained from segmentation with those obtained by NiftyReg varies from 0.1 to 0.21 mm in the SI direction and 0.08 to 0.13 mm in the LR direction showing the high accuracy of deformable registration. Conclusion: We have successfully designed and demonstrated a phantom that can accurately reproduce deformable motion under a variety of imaging modalities including MRI, CT and x-ray fluodoscopy, making it an invaluable research tool for validating novel motion management strategies. This work was partially supported through research funding from National Institutes of Health (R01CA169102).« less
  • Purpose: Deformable Image Registration (DIR) is gaining wider clinical acceptance in radiation oncology. The aim of this work is to characterise a DIR algorithm on publically available 4DCT lung images, such that comparison can be performed against other algorithms. We propose an evaluation method of registration accuracy that takes into account the initial misregistration of the datasets. Methods: The “DIR Validation dataset” ( http://www.creatis.insa-lyon.fr/rio/dir{sub v}alidation{sub d}ata ) provides benchmark data for evaluating 3D CT registration algorithms. It consists of six 4DCT lung datasets (1x1x2mm resolution) with 100 landmarks identified on the end-exhalation and end-inhalation phases. Images were registered to end-inhalationmore » using proprietary form of optical flow in commercial software (Mirada RTx, Mirada Medical, UK). Target registration error was measured before and after DIR, referred to as Initial Registration Error (IRE) and Final Registration Error (FRE). Results: The mean FRE over all landmarks was 1.37±1.81mm. FRE increased with IRE. Mean FRE of 0.86, 0.86, 1.53, 3.38, 4.45, 7.58mm was observed for IRE in the ranges 0–5, 5–10, 10–15, 15–20, 20–25, >25 mm. Higher FRE was observed at the inferior lung, where IRE was greater. Out-of-plane motion contributed more to IRE, and therefore to FRE. Maximum FRE of 20.6mm was observed for IRE of 32.1mm, located at the posterior of the middle lobe for dataset 2. Sub-voxel registration accuracy was achieved for up to 10mm IRE, and increased linearly at 0.3mm FRE/mm IRE thereafter. Conclusion: Publicly available clinical datasets enable algorithms to be compared objectively between publications. However, only reporting average TRE after registration can be misleading as the ability of an algorithm to correct for displacements varies with the IRE or position within the patient. Consequently, algorithms should be characterized using the entire range of initial displacements. For the algorithm assessed, clinically acceptable error within one voxel was achieved for IRE of up to 15mm. TK, AL, and MG are employees of Mirada Medical.« less