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Title: Supermassive dark-matter Q-balls in galactic centers?

Abstract

Though widely accepted, it is not proven that supermassive compact objects (SMCOs) residing in galactic centers are black holes. In particular, the Milky Way’s SMCO can be a giant nontopological soliton, Q-ball, made of a scalar field: this fits perfectly all observational data. Similar but tiny Q-balls produced in the early Universe may constitute, partly or fully, the dark matter. This picture explains in a natural way, why our SMCO has very low accretion rate and why the observed angular size of the corresponding radio source is much smaller than expected. Interactions between dark-matter Q-balls may explain how SMCOs were seeded in galaxies and resolve well-known problems of standard (non-interacting) dark matter.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences,60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)
  2. (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
SCOAP3, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)
OSTI Identifier:
22572185
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2016; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: PUBLISHER-ID: JCAP11(2016)027; OAI: oai:repo.scoap3.org:17890; cc-by Article funded by SCOAP3. Content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ASTROPHYSICS; BLACK HOLES; COSMOLOGY; MILKY WAY; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; SCALAR FIELDS; SOLITONS; STRING THEORY

Citation Formats

Troitsky, Sergey, and Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology,Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region. Supermassive dark-matter Q-balls in galactic centers?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/027.
Troitsky, Sergey, & Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology,Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region. Supermassive dark-matter Q-balls in galactic centers?. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/027.
Troitsky, Sergey, and Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology,Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region. Fri . "Supermassive dark-matter Q-balls in galactic centers?". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/027.
@article{osti_22572185,
title = {Supermassive dark-matter Q-balls in galactic centers?},
author = {Troitsky, Sergey and Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology,Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region},
abstractNote = {Though widely accepted, it is not proven that supermassive compact objects (SMCOs) residing in galactic centers are black holes. In particular, the Milky Way’s SMCO can be a giant nontopological soliton, Q-ball, made of a scalar field: this fits perfectly all observational data. Similar but tiny Q-balls produced in the early Universe may constitute, partly or fully, the dark matter. This picture explains in a natural way, why our SMCO has very low accretion rate and why the observed angular size of the corresponding radio source is much smaller than expected. Interactions between dark-matter Q-balls may explain how SMCOs were seeded in galaxies and resolve well-known problems of standard (non-interacting) dark matter.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2016/11/027},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 11,
volume = 2016,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 11 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Fri Nov 11 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}
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