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Title: Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

Abstract

The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking’s area theorem.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. CERN, Theoretical Physics Department,Geneva (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
SCOAP3, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)
OSTI Identifier:
22572158
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics; Journal Volume: 2016; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: PUBLISHER-ID: JCAP10(2016)001; OAI: oai:repo.scoap3.org:17551; cc-by Article funded by SCOAP3. Content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ASTROPHYSICS; BLACK HOLES; BOSONS; COUPLING; FERMIONS; GENERAL RELATIVITY THEORY; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; REST MASS

Citation Formats

Giudice, Gian F., McCullough, Matthew, and Urbano, Alfredo. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/10/001.
Giudice, Gian F., McCullough, Matthew, & Urbano, Alfredo. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/10/001.
Giudice, Gian F., McCullough, Matthew, and Urbano, Alfredo. 2016. "Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/10/001.
@article{osti_22572158,
title = {Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves},
author = {Giudice, Gian F. and McCullough, Matthew and Urbano, Alfredo},
abstractNote = {The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking’s area theorem.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2016/10/001},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = 10,
volume = 2016,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month =
}
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