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Title: A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains

Abstract

We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid–fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For bothmore » cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22570193
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Computational Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 300; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2015 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALGORITHMS; AORTA; CONVERGENCE; DEFORMATION; DIRICHLET PROBLEM; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FLUIDS; FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTIONS; LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION; REYNOLDS NUMBER; ROTATION; TURBULENT FLOW; VALVES

Citation Formats

Gilmanov, Anvar, Le, Trung Bao, E-mail: lebao002@umn.edu, Sotiropoulos, Fotis, and Department of Civil, Environmental and Geo-Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/J.JCP.2015.08.008.
Gilmanov, Anvar, Le, Trung Bao, E-mail: lebao002@umn.edu, Sotiropoulos, Fotis, & Department of Civil, Environmental and Geo-Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JCP.2015.08.008
Gilmanov, Anvar, Le, Trung Bao, E-mail: lebao002@umn.edu, Sotiropoulos, Fotis, and Department of Civil, Environmental and Geo-Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414. Sun . "A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JCP.2015.08.008.
@article{osti_22570193,
title = {A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains},
author = {Gilmanov, Anvar and Le, Trung Bao, E-mail: lebao002@umn.edu and Sotiropoulos, Fotis and Department of Civil, Environmental and Geo-Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414},
abstractNote = {We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid–fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.},
doi = {10.1016/J.JCP.2015.08.008},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22570193}, journal = {Journal of Computational Physics},
issn = {0021-9991},
number = ,
volume = 300,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {11}
}