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Title: TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities

Abstract

Purpose: Radiomics involves the extraction of texture features from different imaging modalities with the purpose of developing models to predict patient treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate texture feature reproducibility across [18F]FDG PET/CT and [18F]FDG PET/MR imaging in patients with primary malignancies. Methods: Twenty five prospective patients with solid tumors underwent clinical [18F]FDG PET/CT scan followed by [18F]FDG PET/MR scans. In all patients the lesions were identified using nuclear medicine reports. The images were co-registered and segmented using an in-house auto-segmentation method. Fifty features, based on the intensity histogram, second and high order matrices, were extracted from the segmented regions from both image data sets. One-way random-effects ANOVA model of the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to establish texture feature correlations between both data sets. Results: Fifty features were classified based on their ICC values, which were found in the range from 0.1 to 0.86, in three categories: high, intermediate, and low. Ten features extracted from second and high-order matrices showed large ICC ≥ 0.70. Seventeen features presented intermediate 0.5 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.65 and the remaining twenty three presented low ICC ≤ 0.45. Conclusion: Features with large ICC values could be reliable candidates formore » quantification as they lead to similar results from both imaging modalities. Features with small ICC indicates a lack of correlation. Therefore, the use of these features as a quantitative measure will lead to different assessments of the same lesion depending on the imaging modality from where they are extracted. This study shows the importance of the need for further investigation and standardization of features across multiple imaging modalities.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22562987
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; FLUORINE 18; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

Galavis, P, Friedman, K, Chandarana, H, and Jackson, K. TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4925511.
Galavis, P, Friedman, K, Chandarana, H, & Jackson, K. TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925511.
Galavis, P, Friedman, K, Chandarana, H, and Jackson, K. 2015. "TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925511.
@article{osti_22562987,
title = {TU-AB-BRA-06: Texture Feature Reproducibility Between PET/CT and PET/MR Imaging Modalities},
author = {Galavis, P and Friedman, K and Chandarana, H and Jackson, K},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Radiomics involves the extraction of texture features from different imaging modalities with the purpose of developing models to predict patient treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate texture feature reproducibility across [18F]FDG PET/CT and [18F]FDG PET/MR imaging in patients with primary malignancies. Methods: Twenty five prospective patients with solid tumors underwent clinical [18F]FDG PET/CT scan followed by [18F]FDG PET/MR scans. In all patients the lesions were identified using nuclear medicine reports. The images were co-registered and segmented using an in-house auto-segmentation method. Fifty features, based on the intensity histogram, second and high order matrices, were extracted from the segmented regions from both image data sets. One-way random-effects ANOVA model of the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to establish texture feature correlations between both data sets. Results: Fifty features were classified based on their ICC values, which were found in the range from 0.1 to 0.86, in three categories: high, intermediate, and low. Ten features extracted from second and high-order matrices showed large ICC ≥ 0.70. Seventeen features presented intermediate 0.5 ≤ ICC ≤ 0.65 and the remaining twenty three presented low ICC ≤ 0.45. Conclusion: Features with large ICC values could be reliable candidates for quantification as they lead to similar results from both imaging modalities. Features with small ICC indicates a lack of correlation. Therefore, the use of these features as a quantitative measure will lead to different assessments of the same lesion depending on the imaging modality from where they are extracted. This study shows the importance of the need for further investigation and standardization of features across multiple imaging modalities.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4925511},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between image features and the accuracy of manually drawn target contours on synthetic PET images Methods: A digital PET phantom was used in combination with Monte Carlo simulation to create a set of 26 simulated PET images featuring a variety of tumor shapes and activity heterogeneity. These tumor volumes were used as a gold standard in comparisons with manual contours delineated by 10 radiation oncologist on the simulated PET images. Metrics used to evaluate segmentation accuracy included the dice coefficient, false positive dice, false negative dice, symmetric mean absolute surface distance, and absolute volumetric difference.more » Image features extracted from the simulated tumors consisted of volume, shape complexity, mean curvature, and intensity contrast along with five texture features derived from the gray-level neighborhood difference matrices including contrast, coarseness, busyness, strength, and complexity. Correlation between these features and contouring accuracy were examined. Results: Contour accuracy was reasonably well correlated with a variety of image features. Dice coefficient ranged from 0.7 to 0.90 and was correlated closely with contrast (r=0.43, p=0.02) and complexity (r=0.5, p<0.001). False negative dice ranged from 0.10 to 0.50 and was correlated closely with contrast (r=0.68, p<0.001) and complexity (r=0.66, p<0.001). Absolute volumetric difference ranged from 0.0002 to 0.67 and was correlated closely with coarseness (r=0.46, p=0.02) and complexity (r=0.49, p=0.008). Symmetric mean absolute difference ranged from 0.02 to 1 and was correlated closely with mean curvature (r=0.57, p=0.02) and contrast (r=0.6, p=0.001). Conclusion: The long term goal of this study is to assess whether contouring variability can be reduced by providing feedback to the practitioner based on image feature analysis. The results are encouraging and will be used to develop a statistical model which will enable a prediction of contour accuracy based purely on image feature analysis.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Methods: 40 rectal cancer patients were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days (5 days to 17 days), before any treatment was delivered. The rectal gross tumor volume (GTV) was distinguished and segmented by an experienced oncologist in both CTs. Totally, more than 2000 radiomics features were defined in this study, which were divided into four groups (I: GLCM, II: GLRLM III: Wavelet GLCM and IV: Waveletmore » GLRLM). For each group, five types of features were extracted (Max slice: features from the largest slice of target images, Max value: features from all slices of target images and choose the maximum value, Min value: minimum value of features for all slices, Average value: average value of features for all slices, Matrix sum: all slices of target images translate into GLCM and GLRLM matrices and superpose all matrices, then extract features from the superposed matrix). Meanwhile a LOG (Laplace of Gauss) filter with different parameters was applied to these images. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess the reproducibility. Results: 403 radiomics features were extracted from each type of patients’ medical images. Features of average type are the most reproducible. Different filters have little effect for radiomics features. For the average type features, 253 out of 403 features (62.8%) showed high reproducibility (ICC≥0.8), 133 out of 403 features (33.0%) showed medium reproducibility (0.8≥ICC≥0.5) and 17 out of 403 features (4.2%) showed low reproducibility (ICC≥0.5). Conclusion: The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and prognosis prediction.« less
  • Ultrasound imaging is an attractive method for image guided radiation treatment (IGRT), by itself or to complement other imaging modalities. It is inexpensive, portable and provides good soft tissue contrast. For challenging soft tissue targets such as pancreatic cancer, ultrasound imaging can be used in combination with pre-treatment MRI and/or CT to transfer important anatomical features for target localization at time of treatment. The non-invasive and non-ionizing nature of ultrasound imaging is particularly powerful for intra-fraction localization and monitoring. Recognizing these advantages, efforts are being made to incorporate novel robotic approaches to position and manipulate the ultrasound probe during irradiation.more » These recent enabling developments hold potential to bring ultrasound imaging to a new level of IGRT applications. However, many challenges, not limited to image registration, robotic deployment, probe interference and image acquisition rate, need to be addressed to realize the full potential of IGRT with ultrasound imaging. Learning Objectives: Understand the benefits and limitations in using ultrasound to augment MRI and/or CT for motion monitoring during radiation therapy delivery. Understanding passive and active robotic approaches to implement ultrasound imaging for intra-fraction monitoring. Understand issues of probe interference with radiotherapy treatment. Understand the critical clinical workflow for effective and reproducible IGRT using ultrasound guidance. The work of X.L. is supported in part by Elekta; J.W. and K.D. is supported in part by a NIH grant R01 CA161613 and by Elekta; D.H. is support in part by a NIH grant R41 CA174089.« less
  • Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation wasmore » used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78.8% (±3.9% SD) classification reproducibility in terms of OS, LRC, and FFDM, respectively. Conclusions: Pretreatment tumor texture may provide prognostic information beyond that obtained from CPFs. Models incorporating feature reproducibility achieved classification rates of ∼80%. External validation would be required to establish texture as a prognostic factor.« less