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Title: MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: One-Year Analysis of Elekta CBCT Image Quality Using NPS and MTF

Abstract

Purpose: To compare quantitative image quality (IQ) evaluation methods using Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) with standard IQ analyses for minimizing the observer subjectivity of the standard methods and maximizing the information content. Methods: For our routine IQ tests of Elekta XVI Cone-Beam CT, image noise was quantified by the standard deviation of CT number (CT#) (Sigma) over a small area in an IQ test phantom (CatPhan), and the high spatial resolution (HSR) was evaluated by the number of line-pairs (LP#) visually recognizable on the image. We also measured the image uniformity, the low contrast resolution ratio, and the distances of two points for geometrical accuracy. For this study, we did additional evaluation of the XVI data for 12 monthly IQ tests by using NPS for noise, MTF for HSR, and the CT#-to-density relationship. NPS was obtained by applying Fourier analysis in a small area on the uniformity test section of CatPhan. The MTF analysis was performed by applying the Droege-Morin (D-M) method to the line pairs on the phantom. The CT#-to-density was obtained for inserts in the low-contrast test section of the phantom. Results: All the quantities showed a noticeable change over the one-year period.more » Especially the noise level changed significantly after a repair of the imager. NPS was more sensitive to the IQ change than Sigma. MTF could provide more quantitative and objective evaluation of the HSR. The CT# was very different from the expected CT#; but, the CT#-to-density curves were constant within 5% except two months. Conclusion: Since the D-M method is easy to implement, we recommend using MTF instead of the LP# even for routine periodic QA. The month-to-month variation of IQ was not negligible; hence a routine IQ test must be performed, particularly after any modification of hardware including detector calibration.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Hiroshima International University, Hiroshma, Hiroshima (Japan)
  2. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22562949
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; CALIBRATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; FOURIER ANALYSIS; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; NOISE; PHANTOMS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Nakahara, S, Tachibana, M, and Watanabe, Y. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: One-Year Analysis of Elekta CBCT Image Quality Using NPS and MTF. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4925465.
Nakahara, S, Tachibana, M, & Watanabe, Y. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: One-Year Analysis of Elekta CBCT Image Quality Using NPS and MTF. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925465.
Nakahara, S, Tachibana, M, and Watanabe, Y. Mon . "MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: One-Year Analysis of Elekta CBCT Image Quality Using NPS and MTF". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925465.
@article{osti_22562949,
title = {MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: One-Year Analysis of Elekta CBCT Image Quality Using NPS and MTF},
author = {Nakahara, S and Tachibana, M and Watanabe, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To compare quantitative image quality (IQ) evaluation methods using Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) with standard IQ analyses for minimizing the observer subjectivity of the standard methods and maximizing the information content. Methods: For our routine IQ tests of Elekta XVI Cone-Beam CT, image noise was quantified by the standard deviation of CT number (CT#) (Sigma) over a small area in an IQ test phantom (CatPhan), and the high spatial resolution (HSR) was evaluated by the number of line-pairs (LP#) visually recognizable on the image. We also measured the image uniformity, the low contrast resolution ratio, and the distances of two points for geometrical accuracy. For this study, we did additional evaluation of the XVI data for 12 monthly IQ tests by using NPS for noise, MTF for HSR, and the CT#-to-density relationship. NPS was obtained by applying Fourier analysis in a small area on the uniformity test section of CatPhan. The MTF analysis was performed by applying the Droege-Morin (D-M) method to the line pairs on the phantom. The CT#-to-density was obtained for inserts in the low-contrast test section of the phantom. Results: All the quantities showed a noticeable change over the one-year period. Especially the noise level changed significantly after a repair of the imager. NPS was more sensitive to the IQ change than Sigma. MTF could provide more quantitative and objective evaluation of the HSR. The CT# was very different from the expected CT#; but, the CT#-to-density curves were constant within 5% except two months. Conclusion: Since the D-M method is easy to implement, we recommend using MTF instead of the LP# even for routine periodic QA. The month-to-month variation of IQ was not negligible; hence a routine IQ test must be performed, particularly after any modification of hardware including detector calibration.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4925465},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: The Elekta Atlantic system combines a digital linear accelerator system with a 1.5T Philips MRI machine.This study aimed to assess the energy deposited within the cryostat system when the radiation beam passes through the cryostat. The cryocooler on the magnet has a cooling capacity which is about 1 Watt in excess of the cryogenic heat leak into the magnet’s cold mass. A pressure-controlled heater inside the magnet balances the excess refrigeration power such that the helium pressure in the tank is kept slightly above ambient air pressure. If radiation power is deposited in the cold mass then this heatermore » will need less power to maintain pressure equilibrium and if the radiation heat load exceeds the excess cryocooler capacity the pressure will rise. Methods: An in-house CAD based Monte Carlo code based on Penelope was used to model the entire MR-Linac system to quantify the heat load on the magnet’s cold mass. These results were then compared to experimental results obtained from an Elekta Atlantic system installed in UMC-Utrecht. Results: For a field size of 25 cm x 22 cm and a dose rate of 107 mu.min-1, the energy deposited by the radiation beam led to a reduction in heater power from 1.16 to 0.73 W. Simulations predicted a reduction to 0.69 W which is in good agreement. For the worst case field size (largest) and maximum dose rate the cryostat cooler capacity was exceeded. This resulted in a pressure rise within the system but was such that continuous irradiation for over 12 hours would be required before the magnet would start blowing off helium. Conclusion: The study concluded that the Atlantic system does not have to be duty cycle restricted, even for the worst case non-clinical scenario and that there are no adverse effects on the MR system. Stephen Towe and David Roberts Both work for Elekta; Ezra Van Lanen works for Philips Healthcare; Johan Overweg works for Philips Innovative Technologies.« less
  • Purpose: One of the side effects of radiotherapy for head and neck (H&N) cancer is the patient’s anatomical changes. The changes can strongly affect the planned dose distribution. In this work, our goal is to demonstrate that relative analysis of EPID images is a fast and simple method to detect anatomical changes that can have a strong dosimetric impact on the treatment plan for H&N patients. Methods: EPID images were recorded at every beam and all fractions for 50 H&N patients. Of these, five patients that showed important anatomical changes were selected to evaluate dosimetric impacts of these changes andmore » to correlate them with a 2D relative gamma analysis of EPID images. The planning CT and original contours were deformed onto CBCTs (one mid treatment and one at the end of treatment). By using deformable image registration, it was possible to map accurate CT numbers from the planning CT to the anatomy of the day obtained with CBCTs. Clinical treatment plan were then copied on the deformed dataset and dose was re-computed. In parallel, EPID images were analysed using the gamma index (3%3mm) relative to the first image. Results: It was possible to divide patients in two distinct, statistically different (p<0.001) categories using an average gamma index of 0.5 as a threshold. Below this threshold no significant dosimetric degradation of the plan are observed. Above this threshold two types of plan deterioration were seen: (1) target dose increases, but coverage remains adequate while dose to at least one OAR increases beyond tolerances; (2) the OAR doses remain low, but the target dose is reduced and coverage becomes inadequate. Conclusion: Relative analysis gamma of EPID images could indeed be a fast and simple method to detect anatomical changes that can potentially deteriorates treatment plan for H&N patients. This work was supported in part by Varian Medical System.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and robustness, against image noise and artifacts (typical of CBCT images), of a commercial algorithm for deformable image registration (DIR), to propagate regions of interest (ROIs) in computational phantoms based on real prostate patient images. Methods: The Anaconda DIR algorithm, implemented in RayStation was tested. Two specific Deformation Vector Fields (DVFs) were applied to the reference data set (CTref) using the ImSimQA software, obtaining two deformed CTs. For each dataset twenty-four different level of noise and/or capping artifacts were applied to simulate CBCT images. DIR was performed between CTref and each deformed CTs and CBCTs.more » In order to investigate the relationship between image quality parameters and the DIR results (expressed by a logit transform of the Dice Index) a bilinear regression was defined. Results: More than 550 DIR-mapped ROIs were analyzed. The Statistical analysis states that deformation strenght and artifacts were significant prognostic factors of DIR performances, while noise appeared to have a minor role in DIR process as implemented in RayStation as expected by the image similarity metric built in the registration algorithm. Capping artifacts reveals a determinant role for the accuracy of DIR results. Two optimal values for capping artifacts were found to obtain acceptable DIR results (DICE> 075/ 0.85). Various clinical CBCT acquisition protocol were reported to evaluate the significance of the study. Conclusion: This work illustrates the impact of image quality on DIR performance. Clinical issues like Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) and Dose Accumulation need accurate and robust DIR software. The RayStation DIR algorithm resulted robust against noise, but sensitive to image artifacts. This result highlights the need of robustness quality assurance against image noise and artifacts in the commissioning of a DIR commercial system and underlines the importance to adopt optimized protocols for CBCT image acquisitions in ART clinical implementation.« less
  • Purpose: The objective of this study is to propose an alternative QA technique that analyzes imaging quality(IQ) in CBCT-QA processing. Methods: A catphan phantom was used to take CT imaging data set that were imported into a treatment planning system - Eclipse. The image quality was analyzed in terms of in-slice geometry resolution, Hounsfield numbers(HU) accuracy, mean-slice thickness, edge-to-center uniformity, low contrast resolution, and high contrast spatial resolution in Eclipse workstation. The CBCT-QA was also analyzed by OBI-workstation and a commercial software. Comparison was made to evaluation feasibility in a TPS environment. Results: The analysis of IQ was conducted inmore » Eclipse v10.0 TPS. In-slice geometric resolution was measured between 2-rods in section CTP404 and repeated for all 4 rods with the difference between expected and measured values less than +/−0.1 cm. For HU, the difference between expected and measured values in HU was found much less than +/−40. Mean slice thickness measured by a distance on the wire proportional to scanner increment multiplying by a factor of 0.42. After repeating measurements to 4 wires, the average difference between expected and measured values was less +/−0.124 mm in slice thickness. HU uniformity was measured in section CTP486 with the tolerance less than +/−40 HU. Low contrast resolution in section CTP515 and high contrast resolution in section CTP528 were found to be 7 disks in diameter of 4 mm and 6 lp/cm, respectively. Eclipse TPS results indicated a good agreement to those obtained in OBI workstation and ImagePro software for major parameters. Conclusion: An analysis of IQ was proposed as an alternative CBCT QA processing. Based upon measured data assessment, proposed method was accurate and consistent to IQ evaluation and TG142 guideline. The approach was to utilize TPS resource, which can be valuable to re-planning, verification, and delivery in adaptive therapy.« less
  • Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) is used routinely in the clinic without a formalized quality assurance (QA) process. Using simulated deformations to digitally deform images in a known way and comparing to DIR algorithm predictions is a powerful technique for DIR QA. This technique must also simulate realistic image noise and artifacts, especially between modalities. This study developed an algorithm to create simulated daily kV cone-beam computed-tomography (CBCT) images from CT images for DIR QA between these modalities. Methods: A Catphan and physical head-and-neck phantom, with known deformations, were used. CT and kV-CBCT images of the Catphan were utilized tomore » characterize the changes in Hounsfield units, noise, and image cupping that occur between these imaging modalities. The algorithm then imprinted these changes onto a CT image of the deformed head-and-neck phantom, thereby creating a simulated-CBCT image. CT and kV-CBCT images of the undeformed and deformed head-and-neck phantom were also acquired. The Velocity and MIM DIR algorithms were applied between the undeformed CT image and each of the deformed CT, CBCT, and simulated-CBCT images to obtain predicted deformations. The error between the known and predicted deformations was used as a metric to evaluate the quality of the simulated-CBCT image. Ideally, the simulated-CBCT image registration would produce the same accuracy as the deformed CBCT image registration. Results: For Velocity, the mean error was 1.4 mm for the CT-CT registration, 1.7 mm for the CT-CBCT registration, and 1.4 mm for the CT-simulated-CBCT registration. These same numbers were 1.5, 4.5, and 5.9 mm, respectively, for MIM. Conclusion: All cases produced similar accuracy for Velocity. MIM produced similar values of accuracy for CT-CT registration, but was not as accurate for CT-CBCT registrations. The MIM simulated-CBCT registration followed this same trend, but overestimated MIM DIR errors relative to the CT-CBCT registration.« less