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Title: SU-E-T-50: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Software Program for Lung SBRT

Abstract

Purpose: The accuracy of dose distribution depends on treatment planning system especially in heterogeneity-region. The tolerance level (TL) of the secondary check using the independent dose verification may be variable in lung SBRT plans. We conducted a multi-institutional study to evaluate the tolerance level of lung SBRT plans shown in the AAPM TG114. Methods: Five institutes in Japan participated in this study. All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiological path length. Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA), Pencil Beam Convolution with modified Batho-method (PBC-B) and Adaptive Convolve (AC) were used for lung SBRT planning. A measurement using an ion-chamber was performed in a heterogeneous phantom to compare doses from the three different algorithms and the SMU to the measured dose. In addition to it, a retrospective analysis using clinical lung SBRT plans (547 beams from 77 patients) was conducted to evaluate the confidence limit (CL, Average±2SD) in dose between the three algorithms and the SMU. Results: Compared to the measurement, the AAA showed the larger systematic dose error of 2.9±3.2% than PBC-B and AC. The Clarkson-based SMU showedmore » larger error of 5.8±3.8%. The CLs for clinical plans were 7.7±6.0 % (AAA), 5.3±3.3 % (AC), 5.7±3.4 % (PBC -B), respectively. Conclusion: The TLs from the CLs were evaluated. A Clarkson-based system shows a large systematic variation because of inhomogeneous correction. The AAA showed a significant variation. Thus, we must consider the difference of inhomogeneous correction as well as the dependence of dose calculation engine.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3]; ;  [4]; ;  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa-prefecture (Japan)
  2. The Cancer Institute Hospital of JFCR, Koutou-ku, Tokyo (Japan)
  3. The National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa-city, Chiba prefecture (Japan)
  4. Otemae Hospital, Chuou-ku, Osaka-city (Japan)
  5. Sasebo City General Hospital, Sasebo, Nagasaki (Japan)
  6. St Lukes International Hospital, Chuou-ku, Tokyo (Japan)
  7. National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22545181
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; ANISOTROPY; BEAMS; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; ERRORS; IMAGE PROCESSING; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; VERIFICATION

Citation Formats

Kawai, D, Takahashi, R, Kamima, T, Baba, H, Yamamoto, T, Kubo, Y, Ishibashi, S, Higuchi, Y, Takahashi, H, and Tachibana, H. SU-E-T-50: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Software Program for Lung SBRT. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924411.
Kawai, D, Takahashi, R, Kamima, T, Baba, H, Yamamoto, T, Kubo, Y, Ishibashi, S, Higuchi, Y, Takahashi, H, & Tachibana, H. SU-E-T-50: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Software Program for Lung SBRT. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924411.
Kawai, D, Takahashi, R, Kamima, T, Baba, H, Yamamoto, T, Kubo, Y, Ishibashi, S, Higuchi, Y, Takahashi, H, and Tachibana, H. Mon . "SU-E-T-50: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Software Program for Lung SBRT". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924411.
@article{osti_22545181,
title = {SU-E-T-50: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Software Program for Lung SBRT},
author = {Kawai, D and Takahashi, R and Kamima, T and Baba, H and Yamamoto, T and Kubo, Y and Ishibashi, S and Higuchi, Y and Takahashi, H and Tachibana, H},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The accuracy of dose distribution depends on treatment planning system especially in heterogeneity-region. The tolerance level (TL) of the secondary check using the independent dose verification may be variable in lung SBRT plans. We conducted a multi-institutional study to evaluate the tolerance level of lung SBRT plans shown in the AAPM TG114. Methods: Five institutes in Japan participated in this study. All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiological path length. Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA), Pencil Beam Convolution with modified Batho-method (PBC-B) and Adaptive Convolve (AC) were used for lung SBRT planning. A measurement using an ion-chamber was performed in a heterogeneous phantom to compare doses from the three different algorithms and the SMU to the measured dose. In addition to it, a retrospective analysis using clinical lung SBRT plans (547 beams from 77 patients) was conducted to evaluate the confidence limit (CL, Average±2SD) in dose between the three algorithms and the SMU. Results: Compared to the measurement, the AAA showed the larger systematic dose error of 2.9±3.2% than PBC-B and AC. The Clarkson-based SMU showed larger error of 5.8±3.8%. The CLs for clinical plans were 7.7±6.0 % (AAA), 5.3±3.3 % (AC), 5.7±3.4 % (PBC -B), respectively. Conclusion: The TLs from the CLs were evaluated. A Clarkson-based system shows a large systematic variation because of inhomogeneous correction. The AAA showed a significant variation. Thus, we must consider the difference of inhomogeneous correction as well as the dependence of dose calculation engine.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924411},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To show the results of a multi-institutional study of the independent dose verification for conventional, Stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiotherapy (SRS and SBRT) plans based on the action level of AAPM TG-114. Methods: This study was performed at 12 institutions in Japan. To eliminate the bias of independent dose verification program (Indp), all of the institutions used the same CT-based independent dose verification software (Simple MU Analysis, Triangle Products, JP) with the Clarkson-based algorithm. Eclipse (AAA, PBC), Pinnacle{sup 3} (Adaptive Convolve) and Xio (Superposition) were used as treatment planning system (TPS). The confidence limits (CL, Mean±2SD) for 18 sitesmore » (head, breast, lung, pelvis, etc.) were evaluated in comparison in dose between the TPS and the Indp. Results: A retrospective analysis of 6352 treatment fields was conducted. The CLs for conventional, SRS and SBRT were 1.0±3.7 %, 2.0±2.5 % and 6.2±4.4 %, respectively. In conventional plans, most of the sites showed within 5 % of TG-114 action level. However, there were the systematic difference (4.0±4.0 % and 2.5±5.8 % for breast and lung, respectively). In SRS plans, our results showed good agreement compared to the action level. In SBRT plans, the discrepancy between the Indp was variable depending on dose calculation algorithms of TPS. Conclusion: The impact of dose calculation algorithms for the TPS and the Indp affects the action level. It is effective to set the site-specific tolerances, especially for the site where inhomogeneous correction can affect dose distribution strongly.« less
  • Purpose: AAPM TG114 does not cover the independent verification for IMRT. We conducted a study of independent dose verification for IMRT in seven institutes to show the feasibility. Methods: 384 IMRT plans in the sites of prostate and head and neck (HN) were collected from the institutes, where the planning was performed using Eclipse and Pinnacle3 with the two techniques of step and shoot (S&S) and sliding window (SW). All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiologicalmore » path length. An ion-chamber measurement in a water-equivalent slab phantom was performed to compare the doses computed using the TPS and an independent dose verification program. Additionally, the agreement in dose computed in patient CT images between using the TPS and using the SMU was assessed. The dose of the composite beams in the plan was evaluated. Results: The agreement between the measurement and the SMU were −2.3±1.9 % and −5.6±3.6 % for prostate and HN sites, respectively. The agreement between the TPSs and the SMU were −2.1±1.9 % and −3.0±3.7 for prostate and HN sites, respectively. There was a negative systematic difference with similar standard deviation and the difference was larger in the HN site. The S&S technique showed a statistically significant difference between the SW. Because the Clarkson-based method in the independent program underestimated (cannot consider) the dose under the MLC. Conclusion: The accuracy would be improved when the Clarkson-based algorithm should be modified for IMRT and the tolerance level would be within 5%.« less
  • Purpose: In general, beam data of individual linac is measured for independent dose verification software program and the verification is performed as a secondary check. In this study, independent dose verification using golden beam data was compared to that using individual linac’s beam data. Methods: Six institutions were participated and three different beam data were prepared. The one was individual measured data (Original Beam Data, OBD) .The others were generated by all measurements from same linac model (Model-GBD) and all linac models (All-GBD). The three different beam data were registered to the independent verification software program for each institute. Subsequently,more » patient’s plans in eight sites (brain, head and neck, lung, esophagus, breast, abdomen, pelvis and bone) were analyzed using the verification program to compare doses calculated using the three different beam data. Results: 1116 plans were collected from six institutes. Compared to using the OBD, the results shows the variation using the Model-GBD based calculation and the All-GBD was 0.0 ± 0.3% and 0.0 ± 0.6%, respectively. The maximum variations were 1.2% and 2.3%, respectively. The plans with the variation over 1% shows the reference points were located away from the central axis with/without physical wedge. Conclusion: The confidence limit (2SD) using the Model-GBD and the All-GBD was within 0.6% and 1.2%, respectively. Thus, the use of golden beam data may be feasible for independent verification. In addition to it, the verification using golden beam data provide quality assurance of planning from the view of audit. This research is partially supported by Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development(AMED)« less
  • Purpose: Lung-SBRT uses hypo-fractionated dose in small non-IMRT fields with tissue-heterogeneity corrected plans. An independent MU verification is mandatory for safe and effective delivery of the treatment plan. This report compares planned MU obtained from iPlan-XVM-Calgorithm against spreadsheet-based hand-calculation using most commonly used simple TMR-based method. Methods: Treatment plans of 15 patients who underwent for MC-based lung-SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions for PTV V100%=95% were studied. ITV was delineated on MIP images based on 4D-CT scans. PTVs(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 10.1- 106.5cc(average=48.6cc). MC-SBRT plans were generated using a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVM-Calgorithm (BrainLAB iPlan ver.4.1.2)more » for Novalis-TX consisting of micro-MLCs and 6MV-SRS (1000MU/min) beam. These plans were re-computed using heterogeneity-corrected Pencil-Beam (PB-hete) algorithm without changing any beam parameters, such as MLCs/MUs. Dose-ratio: PB-hete/MC gave beam-by-beam inhomogeneity-correction-factors (ICFs):Individual Correction. For independent-2nd-check, MC-MUs were verified using TMR-based hand-calculation and obtained an average ICF:Average Correction, whereas TMR-based hand-calculation systematically underestimated MC-MUs by ∼5%. Also, first 10 MC-plans were verified with an ion-chamber measurement using homogenous phantom. Results: For both beams/arcs, mean PB-hete dose was systematically overestimated by 5.5±2.6% and mean hand-calculated MU systematic underestimated by 5.5±2.5% compared to XVMC. With individual correction, mean hand-calculated MUs matched with XVMC by - 0.3±1.4%/0.4±1.4 for beams/arcs, respectively. After average 5% correction, hand-calculated MUs matched with XVMC by 0.5±2.5%/0.6±2.0% for beams/arcs, respectively. Smaller dependence on tumor volume(TV)/field size(FS) was also observed. Ion-chamber measurement was within ±3.0%. Conclusion: PB-hete overestimates dose to lung tumor relative to XVMC. XVMC-algorithm is much more-complex and accurate with tissues-heterogeneities. Measurement at machine is time consuming and need extra resources; also direct measurement of dose for heterogeneous treatment plans is not clinically practiced, yet. This simple correction-based method was very helpful for independent-2nd-check of MC-lung-SBRT plans and routinely used in our clinic. A look-up table can be generated to include TV/FS dependence in ICFs.« less
  • Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluencemore » by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient.« less