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Title: SU-E-T-06: 4D Particle Swarm Optimization to Enable Lung SBRT in Patients with Central And/or Large Tumors

Abstract

Purpose: Patients presenting with large and/or centrally-located lung tumors are currently considered ineligible for highly potent regimens such as SBRT due to concerns of toxicity to normal tissues and organs-at-risk (OARs). We present a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based 4D planning technique, designed for MLC tracking delivery, that exploits the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom to significantly improve OAR-sparing and reduce toxicity to levels clinically considered as acceptable for SBRT administration. Methods: Two early-stage SBRT-ineligible NSCLC patients were considered, presenting with tumors of maximum dimensions of 7.4cm (central-right lobe; 1.5cm motion) and 11.9cm (upper-right lobe; 1cm motion). In each case, the target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten 4DCT phases. Corresponding ten initial 3D-conformal plans (Pt#1: 7-beams; Pt#2: 9-beams) were generated using the Eclipse planning system. Using 4D-PSO, fluence weights were optimized over all beams and all phases (70 and 90 apertures for Pt1&2, respectively). Doses to normal tissues and OARs were compared with clinicallyestablished lung SBRT guidelines based on RTOG-0236. Results: The PSO-based 4D SBRT plan yielded tumor coverage and dose—sparing for parallel and serial OARs within the SBRT guidelines for both patients. The dose-sparing compared to the clinically-delivered conventionallyfractionated plan formore » Patient 1 (Patient 2) was: heart Dmean = 11% (33%); lung V20 = 16% (21%); lung Dmean = 7% (20%); spinal cord Dmax = 5% (16%); spinal cord Dmean = 7% (33%); esophagus Dmax = 0% (18%). Conclusion: Truly 4D planning can significantly reduce dose to normal tissues and OARs. Such sparing opens up the possibility of using highly potent and effective regimens such as lung SBRT for patients who were conventionally considered SBRT non-eligible. Given the large, non-convex solution space, PSO represents an attractive, parallelizable tool to successfully achieve a globally optimal solution for this problem. This work was supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health and Varian Medical Systems.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22545141
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; BEAMS; COLLIMATORS; ESOPHAGUS; HEART; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RECOMMENDATIONS; SPINAL CORD; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Modiri, A, Gu, X, Hagan, A, and Sawant, A. SU-E-T-06: 4D Particle Swarm Optimization to Enable Lung SBRT in Patients with Central And/or Large Tumors. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924367.
Modiri, A, Gu, X, Hagan, A, & Sawant, A. SU-E-T-06: 4D Particle Swarm Optimization to Enable Lung SBRT in Patients with Central And/or Large Tumors. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924367.
Modiri, A, Gu, X, Hagan, A, and Sawant, A. Mon . "SU-E-T-06: 4D Particle Swarm Optimization to Enable Lung SBRT in Patients with Central And/or Large Tumors". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924367.
@article{osti_22545141,
title = {SU-E-T-06: 4D Particle Swarm Optimization to Enable Lung SBRT in Patients with Central And/or Large Tumors},
author = {Modiri, A and Gu, X and Hagan, A and Sawant, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Patients presenting with large and/or centrally-located lung tumors are currently considered ineligible for highly potent regimens such as SBRT due to concerns of toxicity to normal tissues and organs-at-risk (OARs). We present a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based 4D planning technique, designed for MLC tracking delivery, that exploits the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom to significantly improve OAR-sparing and reduce toxicity to levels clinically considered as acceptable for SBRT administration. Methods: Two early-stage SBRT-ineligible NSCLC patients were considered, presenting with tumors of maximum dimensions of 7.4cm (central-right lobe; 1.5cm motion) and 11.9cm (upper-right lobe; 1cm motion). In each case, the target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten 4DCT phases. Corresponding ten initial 3D-conformal plans (Pt#1: 7-beams; Pt#2: 9-beams) were generated using the Eclipse planning system. Using 4D-PSO, fluence weights were optimized over all beams and all phases (70 and 90 apertures for Pt1&2, respectively). Doses to normal tissues and OARs were compared with clinicallyestablished lung SBRT guidelines based on RTOG-0236. Results: The PSO-based 4D SBRT plan yielded tumor coverage and dose—sparing for parallel and serial OARs within the SBRT guidelines for both patients. The dose-sparing compared to the clinically-delivered conventionallyfractionated plan for Patient 1 (Patient 2) was: heart Dmean = 11% (33%); lung V20 = 16% (21%); lung Dmean = 7% (20%); spinal cord Dmax = 5% (16%); spinal cord Dmean = 7% (33%); esophagus Dmax = 0% (18%). Conclusion: Truly 4D planning can significantly reduce dose to normal tissues and OARs. Such sparing opens up the possibility of using highly potent and effective regimens such as lung SBRT for patients who were conventionally considered SBRT non-eligible. Given the large, non-convex solution space, PSO represents an attractive, parallelizable tool to successfully achieve a globally optimal solution for this problem. This work was supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health and Varian Medical Systems.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924367},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose 4D-IMRT planning, combined with dynamic MLC tracking delivery, utilizes the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom to achieve improved OAR-sparing. The computational complexity for such optimization increases exponentially with increase in dimensionality. In order to accomplish this task in a clinically-feasible time frame, we present an initial implementation of GPU-based 4D-IMRT planning based on particle swarm optimization (PSO). Methods The target and normal structures were manually contoured on ten phases of a 4DCT scan of a NSCLC patient with a 54cm3 right-lower-lobe tumor (1.5cm motion). Corresponding ten 3D-IMRT plans were created in the Eclipse treatment planning systemmore » (Ver-13.6). A vendor-provided scripting interface was used to export 3D-dose matrices corresponding to each control point (10 phases × 9 beams × 166 control points = 14,940), which served as input to PSO. The optimization task was to iteratively adjust the weights of each control point and scale the corresponding dose matrices. In order to handle the large amount of data in GPU memory, dose matrices were sparsified and placed in contiguous memory blocks with the 14,940 weight-variables. PSO was implemented on CPU (dual-Xeon, 3.1GHz) and GPU (dual-K20 Tesla, 2496 cores, 3.52Tflops, each) platforms. NiftyReg, an open-source deformable image registration package, was used to calculate the summed dose. Results The 4D-PSO plan yielded PTV coverage comparable to the clinical ITV-based plan and significantly higher OAR-sparing, as follows: lung Dmean=33%; lung V20=27%; spinal cord Dmax=26%; esophagus Dmax=42%; heart Dmax=0%; heart Dmean=47%. The GPU-PSO processing time for 14940 variables and 7 PSO-particles was 41% that of CPU-PSO (199 vs. 488 minutes). Conclusion Truly 4D-IMRT planning can yield significant OAR dose-sparing while preserving PTV coverage. The corresponding optimization problem is large-scale, non-convex and computationally rigorous. Our initial results indicate that GPU-based PSO with further software optimization can make such planning clinically feasible. This work was supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health and Varian Medical Systems.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate XVMC computed rib doses for peripherally located non-small-cell-lung tumors treated with SBRT following RTOG-0915 guidelines. Methods: Twenty patients with solitary peripherally located non-small-cell-lung tumors were treated using XVMC-based SBRT to 50–54Gy in 5−3 fractions, respectively, for PTV(V100%)=95%. Based on 4D-CT, ITV was delineated on MaximumIP images and organs-at-risk(OARs) including ribs were contoured on MeanIP images. Mean PTV(ITV+5mm uniform margin) was 46.1±38.7cc (range, 11.1–163.0cc). XVMC SBRT treatment plans were generated with a combination of non-coplanar 3D-conformal arcs/beams, and were delivered by Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and a 6MV-SRS(1000MU/min) beam, following RTOG-0915 criteria. XVMC rib maximum dose and dosemore » to <1cc, <5cc, <10cc were evaluated as a function of PTV, prescription dose and 3D-distance from tumor isocenter to the most proximal rib contour. Plans were re-computed using heterogeneity-corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm utilizing identical beam geometry/MLC positions and MUs and subsequently compared to XVMC. Results: XVMC average maximum rib dose was 50.9±6.4Gy (range, 35.1–59.3Gy). XVMC mean rib dose to <1cc was 41.6±5.6Gy (range, 27.9–47.9Gy), <5cc was 31.2±7.3Gy (range, 10.6–43.1Gy), and <10cc was 21.2±8.7Gy (range, 1.1–36Gy), respectively. For the given prescription, correlation between PTV and rib doses to <5cc (p=0.005) and <10cc (p=0.018) was observed. 3D-distance from the tumor isocenter to the proximal rib contour strongly correlated with maximum rib dose (p=0.0001). PB-hete algorithm overestimated maximum rib dose and dose to <1cc, <5cc, and <10cc of ribs by 5%, 3%, 3%, and 3%, respectively. Conclusion: PB-hete overestimates ribs dose relative to XVMC. Since all the clinical XVMC plans were generated without compromising the target coverage (per RTOG-0915), almost all patient’s ribs doses were higher than the protocol guidelines. As expected, larger tumor size and proximity to ribs received higher absolute dose to ribs. Prospective observation is needed to determine if XVMC delivered rib doses correlates with patient symptoms including chest wall pain and/or rib fractures.« less
  • Purpose: To study the potential of improving esophageal sparing for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung cancer patients by using biological optimization (BO) compared to conventional dose-volume based optimization (DVO) in treatment planning. Methods: Three NSCLC patients (PTV (62.3cc, 65.1cc, and 125.1cc) adjacent to the heart) previously treated with SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse TPS (V11) using DVO and BO. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 5 fractions normalized to 95% of the PTV volume. Plans were evaluated by comparing esophageal maximum doses, PTV heterogeneity (HI= D5%/D95%), and Paddick’s conformity (CI) indices. Quality of the plans was assessedmore » by clinically-used IMRT QA procedures. Results: By using BO, the maximum dose to the esophagus was decreased 1384 cGy (34.6%), 502 cGy (16.5%) and 532 cGy (16.2%) in patient 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The maximum doses to spinal cord and the doses to 1000 cc and 1500 cc of normal lung were comparable in both plans. The mean doses (Dmean-hrt) and doses to 15cc of the heart (V15-hrt) were comparable for patient 1 and 2. However for patient 3, with the largest PTV, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased by 62.2 cGy (18.3%) and 549.9 cGy (24.9%) respectively for the BO plans. The mean target HI of BO plans (1.13) was inferior to the DVO plans (1.07). The same trend was also observed for mean CI in BO plans (0.77) versus DVO plans (0.83). The QA pass rates (3%, 3mm) were comparable for both plans. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the use of biological models in treatment planning optimization can substantially improve esophageal sparing without compromising spinal cord and normal lung doses. However, for the large PTV case (125.1cc) we studied here, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased substantially. The target HI and CI were inferior in the BO plans.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the feasibility of treating lung SBRT patients with the ipsilateral arm adducted beside the body instead of elevated above the head. Methods: Patients receiving lung SBRT at our institution are typically treated with both arms raised above their head. However, several patients had difficulty maintaining their arms in an elevated position. In this study, lung SBRT patients who underwent PET-CT imaging with an adducted ipsilateral arm were selected to investigate the dosimetric effects of this treatment setup. PET-CT datasets were fused with treatment planning CT images to simulate the adducted arm position. One VMAT treatment plan wasmore » created per patient using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Plans were optimized to achieve minimal dose to the ipsilateral arm while keeping the target coverage and critical structure doses within clinical limits. The target dose coverage, conformity index (CI) for the target, and DVHs of critical structures for the adducted arm plan were calculated. These parameters were compared with the clinical plan and reported along with the mean and maximum doses of the ipsilateral arm. Results: The target coverage, CI and DVHs for the adducted arm plans of two patients (one with peripheral lesion and one with central lesion) were comparable with the clinical plans. Dose constraints for the chest wall limited further reduction of ipsilateral arm doses for the peripheral lesion plan. The mean ipsilateral arm doses for the central and peripheral lesions were 0.33 Gy and 2.4 Gy, respectively. The maximum ipsilateral arm doses for the central and peripheral lesions were 1.0 Gy and 6.2 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggested patients with central lung SBRT tumors were more suitable for treatment with the adducted arm position. More patients with various lung tumor locations will be studied to find optimal tumor locations for treatment with this arm position.« less
  • Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is commonly used to treat early stage lung tumors. This study was designed to evaluate associations between dose, volume and clinical outcomes including analysis of both clinical toxicity scores and quality of life (QOL) data for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SBRT. Preliminary results are presented. Methods: Sixty-seven NSCLC patients, 46 primarily with early stage, and 21 with recurrent disease were treated with dose regimens consisting mainly of 12 Gy x 4 fractions, and 3 or 5 fractions at lower dose, for patients with recurrent disease (Table 1). Follow-up data is being collectedmore » at baseline, after treatment and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post-treatment. Clinical follow-up data acquired to date was assessed using the Charlson Comorbidity Clinical and Toxicity Scoring forms. QOL data was evaluated using the EQ-5D, and FACT-TOI validated surveys. All outcomes surveys are collected within an “in-house” developed outcomes database. Results: The median follow-up was 3.5±0.8 months. Mean lung doses (MLD) were converted to BED-2 Gy using the linear-quadratic model with an alpha/beta=3.0. Average MLD was 3.7+3.1 Gy (range: 0.4–20.9 Gy). The percentages of patients with > grade 2 cough, dyspnea and fatigue were 13.3, 17.0, 6.3%, respectively. Preliminary analyses (at 3 months after SBRT) show a mild correlation between MLD > 2 Gy and > grade 2 cough (borderline significant) and dyspnea (significant, p<0.05). One patient was observed with a grade 3 cough. Given the short follow-up, tumor control is not yet assessable. Conclusion: The SBRT dose fractionation regimen of 12 Gy x 4 was well tolerated at early time points. Additional follow-up is required to assess the long-term clinical outcome efficacy and toxicity profiles of the dose regimen.« less