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Title: SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate radiation responses of the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), quantitative variations to variable radiation dosimetic parameters were tracked by bioluminescent images (BLIs). Methods: The luciferase and green fluorescent protein positive Daoy cells were cultured on dishes. The medulloblastoma cells irradiated to different dose rate, interval of fractionated doses, field margin and misalignment, and dose uniformity in IMRT were monitored using bioluminescent images. The cultured cells were placed into a dedicated acrylic phantom to deliver intensity-modulated fluences and calculate accurate predicted dose distribution. The radiation with dose rate from 0.5 Gy/min to 15 Gy/min was irradiated by adjusting monitor unit per minute and source-to-surface distances. The intervals of fractionated dose delivery were changed considering the repair time of double strand breaks (DSB) revealed by straining of gamma-H2AX.The effect of non-uniform doses on the cells were visualized by registering dose distributions and BLIs. The viability according to dosimetric parameters was correlated with bioluminescent intensities for cross-check of radiation responses. Results: The DSB and cell responses due to the first fractionated dose delivery significantly affected final tumor control rather than other parameters. The missing tumor volumes due to the smaller field margin than the tumor peripherymore » or field misalignment caused relapse of cell responses on BLIs. The dose rate and gradient had effect on initial responses but could not bring out the distinguishable killing effect on cancer cells. Conclusion: Visualized and quantified bioluminescent images were useful to correlate the dose distributions with spatial radiation effects on cells. This would derive the effective combination of dose delivery parameters and fractionation. Radiation responses in particular IMRT configuration could be reflected to image based-dose re-optimization.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [5];  [6];  [3];  [7];  [6];  [3]
  1. Dept. of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. (Korea, Republic of)
  4. Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)
  5. Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  6. Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  7. Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22545134
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL REPAIR; CELL CULTURES; DOSE RATES; FLUORESCENCE; FRACTIONATION; IMAGES; IRRADIATION; LUCIFERASE; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; PARTICLE TRACKS; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; STRAND BREAKS

Citation Formats

Park, J, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Park, J, Rogalla, S, Contag, C, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Woo, D, Lee, D, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Park, H, Suh, T, and Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul. SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924360.
Park, J, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Park, J, Rogalla, S, Contag, C, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Woo, D, Lee, D, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Park, H, Suh, T, & Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul. SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924360.
Park, J, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Park, J, Rogalla, S, Contag, C, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Woo, D, Lee, D, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Park, H, Suh, T, and Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul. Mon . "SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924360.
@article{osti_22545134,
title = {SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy},
author = {Park, J and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul and Park, J and Rogalla, S and Contag, C and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA and Woo, D and Lee, D and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul and Park, H and Suh, T and Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate radiation responses of the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), quantitative variations to variable radiation dosimetic parameters were tracked by bioluminescent images (BLIs). Methods: The luciferase and green fluorescent protein positive Daoy cells were cultured on dishes. The medulloblastoma cells irradiated to different dose rate, interval of fractionated doses, field margin and misalignment, and dose uniformity in IMRT were monitored using bioluminescent images. The cultured cells were placed into a dedicated acrylic phantom to deliver intensity-modulated fluences and calculate accurate predicted dose distribution. The radiation with dose rate from 0.5 Gy/min to 15 Gy/min was irradiated by adjusting monitor unit per minute and source-to-surface distances. The intervals of fractionated dose delivery were changed considering the repair time of double strand breaks (DSB) revealed by straining of gamma-H2AX.The effect of non-uniform doses on the cells were visualized by registering dose distributions and BLIs. The viability according to dosimetric parameters was correlated with bioluminescent intensities for cross-check of radiation responses. Results: The DSB and cell responses due to the first fractionated dose delivery significantly affected final tumor control rather than other parameters. The missing tumor volumes due to the smaller field margin than the tumor periphery or field misalignment caused relapse of cell responses on BLIs. The dose rate and gradient had effect on initial responses but could not bring out the distinguishable killing effect on cancer cells. Conclusion: Visualized and quantified bioluminescent images were useful to correlate the dose distributions with spatial radiation effects on cells. This would derive the effective combination of dose delivery parameters and fractionation. Radiation responses in particular IMRT configuration could be reflected to image based-dose re-optimization.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924360},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}