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Title: SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate radiation responses of the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), quantitative variations to variable radiation dosimetic parameters were tracked by bioluminescent images (BLIs). Methods: The luciferase and green fluorescent protein positive Daoy cells were cultured on dishes. The medulloblastoma cells irradiated to different dose rate, interval of fractionated doses, field margin and misalignment, and dose uniformity in IMRT were monitored using bioluminescent images. The cultured cells were placed into a dedicated acrylic phantom to deliver intensity-modulated fluences and calculate accurate predicted dose distribution. The radiation with dose rate from 0.5 Gy/min to 15 Gy/min was irradiated by adjusting monitor unit per minute and source-to-surface distances. The intervals of fractionated dose delivery were changed considering the repair time of double strand breaks (DSB) revealed by straining of gamma-H2AX.The effect of non-uniform doses on the cells were visualized by registering dose distributions and BLIs. The viability according to dosimetric parameters was correlated with bioluminescent intensities for cross-check of radiation responses. Results: The DSB and cell responses due to the first fractionated dose delivery significantly affected final tumor control rather than other parameters. The missing tumor volumes due to the smaller field margin than the tumor peripherymore » or field misalignment caused relapse of cell responses on BLIs. The dose rate and gradient had effect on initial responses but could not bring out the distinguishable killing effect on cancer cells. Conclusion: Visualized and quantified bioluminescent images were useful to correlate the dose distributions with spatial radiation effects on cells. This would derive the effective combination of dose delivery parameters and fractionation. Radiation responses in particular IMRT configuration could be reflected to image based-dose re-optimization.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [5];  [6];  [3];  [7];  [6];  [3]
  1. Dept. of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. (Korea, Republic of)
  4. Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)
  5. Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  6. Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  7. Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22545134
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL REPAIR; CELL CULTURES; DOSE RATES; FLUORESCENCE; FRACTIONATION; IMAGES; IRRADIATION; LUCIFERASE; NEOPLASMS; OPTIMIZATION; PARTICLE TRACKS; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; STRAND BREAKS

Citation Formats

Park, J, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Park, J, Rogalla, S, Contag, C, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Woo, D, Lee, D, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Park, H, Suh, T, and Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul. SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924360.
Park, J, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Park, J, Rogalla, S, Contag, C, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Woo, D, Lee, D, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Park, H, Suh, T, & Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul. SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924360.
Park, J, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Park, J, Rogalla, S, Contag, C, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA, Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA, Woo, D, Lee, D, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Park, H, Suh, T, and Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul. Mon . "SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924360.
@article{osti_22545134,
title = {SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy},
author = {Park, J and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul and Park, J and Rogalla, S and Contag, C and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA and Woo, D and Lee, D and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul and Park, H and Suh, T and Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate radiation responses of the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), quantitative variations to variable radiation dosimetic parameters were tracked by bioluminescent images (BLIs). Methods: The luciferase and green fluorescent protein positive Daoy cells were cultured on dishes. The medulloblastoma cells irradiated to different dose rate, interval of fractionated doses, field margin and misalignment, and dose uniformity in IMRT were monitored using bioluminescent images. The cultured cells were placed into a dedicated acrylic phantom to deliver intensity-modulated fluences and calculate accurate predicted dose distribution. The radiation with dose rate from 0.5 Gy/min to 15 Gy/min was irradiated by adjusting monitor unit per minute and source-to-surface distances. The intervals of fractionated dose delivery were changed considering the repair time of double strand breaks (DSB) revealed by straining of gamma-H2AX.The effect of non-uniform doses on the cells were visualized by registering dose distributions and BLIs. The viability according to dosimetric parameters was correlated with bioluminescent intensities for cross-check of radiation responses. Results: The DSB and cell responses due to the first fractionated dose delivery significantly affected final tumor control rather than other parameters. The missing tumor volumes due to the smaller field margin than the tumor periphery or field misalignment caused relapse of cell responses on BLIs. The dose rate and gradient had effect on initial responses but could not bring out the distinguishable killing effect on cancer cells. Conclusion: Visualized and quantified bioluminescent images were useful to correlate the dose distributions with spatial radiation effects on cells. This would derive the effective combination of dose delivery parameters and fractionation. Radiation responses in particular IMRT configuration could be reflected to image based-dose re-optimization.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924360},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected formore » the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.« less
  • Purpose: Recent development of an MLC for robotic external beam radiotherapy has the potential of new clinical application in conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. This study offers a dosimetric comparison of IMRT plans using Cyberknife with MLC versus conventional linac plans. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients treated on a traditional linac with IMRT to 7920cGy at 180cGy/fraction were randomly selected. GTVs were defined as prostate plus proximal seminal vesicles. PTVs were defined as GTV+8mm in all directions except 5mm posteriorly. Conventional IMRT planning was performed on Philips Pinnacle and delivered on a standard linac with CBCT and 10mm collimator leaf width.more » For each case a Cyberknife plan was created using Accuray Multiplan with same CT data set, contours, and dose constraints. All dosimetric data was transferred to third party software for independent computation of contour volumes and DVH. Delivery efficiency was evaluated using total MU, treatment time, number of beams, and number of segments. Results: Evaluation criteria including percent target coverage, homogeneity index, and conformity index were found to be comparable. All dose constraints from QUANTEC were found to be statistically similar except rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy. Average rectum V50Gy was lower for robotic IMRT (30.07%±6.57) versus traditional (34.73%±3.62, p=0.0130). Average bladder V65Gy was lower for robotic (17.87%±12.74) versus traditional (21.03%±11.93, p=0.0405). Linac plans utilized 9 coplanar beams, 48.9±3.8 segments, and 19381±2399MU. Robotic plans utilized 38.4±9.0 non-coplanar beams, 85.5±21.0 segments and 42554.71±16381.54 MU. The average treatment was 15.02±0.60 minutes for traditional versus 20.90±2.51 for robotic. Conclusion: The robotic IMRT plans were comparable to the traditional IMRT plans in meeting the target volume dose objectives. Critical structure dose constraints were largely comparable although statistically significant differences were found in favor of the robotic platform in terms of rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy at a cost of 25% longer treatment time.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target canmore » achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.« less
  • Purpose: dosimetric comparison of 3DCRT and IMRT in 9 esophageal cancer. The aim of this paper is to know which of these two techniques is dosimetrically more favorable dosimetrically at both the CTV coverage and dose obtained in the relevant organs at risk, in this case, lungs and heart, as the spinal cord received in all cases below 45 Gy. Methods: we chose 9 patients from our center (CHN) with the same type of esophageal cancer and in which the prescribed dose was the same, 54 Gy. For these treatments we have used the same fields and the same anglesmore » (AP (0 °), OPD (225°–240°) and OPI (125°–135°)).All plans have been implemented using Eclipse (version 11.0) with AAA( Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm )(Version 11.0.31). Results: To analyze the coverage of the CTV, we have evaluated the D99% and found that the average dose received by 99% of CTV with IMRT is 53.8 ± 0.4 Gy (99.6% of the prescribed dose) and the mean value obtained with 3DCRT is 52.3 ± 0.6 Gy (96.8% of the prescribed dose).The last data analyzed was the D2% of PTV, a fact that gives us information on the maximum dose received by our PTV. D2% of the PTV for IMRT planning is 55.4 ± 0.4 Gy (102.6% of the prescribed dose) and with 3DCRT is 56.8 ± 0.7 Gy (105.2% of the prescribed dose).All parameters analyzed at risk organs (V30, V40, V45 and V50 for the case of heart and V5, V10, V15 and V20 for the case of the lungs) provide us irradiated volume percentages lower in IMRT than 3DCRT. Conclusion: IMRT provides a considerable improvement in the coverage of the CTV and the doses to organs at risk.« less
  • Purpose This study compares the dosimetric parameters in treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma between intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and intensity modulated x-ray radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We studied four patients treated at our institution. All patients were simulated supine with 4D-CT using a GE light speed simulator with a maximum slice thickness of 3mm. The average CT and an internal target volume to account for respiration motion were used for planning. Both IMRT and IMPT plans were created using Elekta’s CMSXiO treatment planning system (TPS). The prescription dose was 58.05 CGE in 15 fractions. The IMRT plansmore » had five beams with combination of co-planar and non-co-planar. The IMPT plans had 2 to 3 beams. Dose comparison was performed based on the averaged results of the four patients. Results The mean dose and V95% to PTV were 58.24CGE, 98.57% for IMPT, versus 57.34CGE and 96.68% for IMRT, respectively. The V10, V20, V30 and mean dose of the normal liver for IMPT were 23.10%, 18.61%, 13.75% and 9.78 CGE; and 47.19%, 37.55%, 22.73% and 17.12CGE for IMRT. The spinal cord didn’t receive any dose in IMPT technique, but received a maximum of 18.77CGE for IMRT. The IMPT gave lower maximum dose to the stomach as compared to IMRT (19.26 vs 26.35CGE). V14 for left and right kidney was 0% and 2.32% for IMPT and 3.89% and 29.54% for IMRT. The mean dose, V35, V40 and V45 for small bowl were similar in both techniques, 0.74CGE, 6.27cc, 4.85cc and 3.53 cc for IMPT, 3.47CGE, 9.73cc, 7.61cc 5.35cc for IMRT. Conclusion Based on this study, IMPT plans gave less dose to the critical structures such as normal liver, kidney, stomach and spinal cord as compared to IMRT plans, potentially leading to less toxicity and providing better quality of life for patients.« less