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Title: SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity

Abstract

Purpose: Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia with radiosurgery is well established, but often met with limited success. Recent advancements in imaging afford improvements in target localization for radiosurgery. Methods: A Trigeminal Neuralgia radiosurgery specific protocol was established for MR enhancement of the trigeminal nerve using a CISS scan with slice spacing of 0.7mm. Computed Tomography simulation was performed using axial slices on a 40 slice CT with slice spacing of 0.6mm. These datasets were registered using a mutual information algorithm and localized in a stereotactic coordinate system. Image registration between the MR and CT was evaluated for each patient by a Medical Physicist to ensure accuracy. The dorsal root entry zone target was defined on the CISS MR by a Neurosurgeon and dose calculations performed on the localized CT. Treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a Radiation Oncologist and Neurosurgeon. Image guided radiosurgery was delivered using positioning tolerance of 0.5mm and 1°. Eight patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia were treated with this protocol. Results: Seven patients reported a favorable response to treatment with average Barrow Neurological Index pain score of four before treatment and one following treatment. Only one patient had a BNI>1 following treatment and review of the treatment planmore » revealed that the CISS MR was registered to the CT via a low resolution (5mm slice spacing) T2 MR. All other patients had CISS MR registered directly with the localized CT. This patient was retreated 6 months later using direct registration between CISS MR and localized CT and subsequently responded to treatment with a BNI of one. Conclusion: Frameless radiosurgery offers an effective solution to Trigeminal Neuralgia management provided appropriate technology and imaging protocols (utilizing submillimeter imaging) are established and maintained.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Associates In Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States)
  2. Norton Cancer Institute, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22538177
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Howe, J, and Spalding, A. SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4925032.
Howe, J, & Spalding, A. SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925032.
Howe, J, and Spalding, A. Mon . "SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925032.
@article{osti_22538177,
title = {SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity},
author = {Howe, J and Spalding, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia with radiosurgery is well established, but often met with limited success. Recent advancements in imaging afford improvements in target localization for radiosurgery. Methods: A Trigeminal Neuralgia radiosurgery specific protocol was established for MR enhancement of the trigeminal nerve using a CISS scan with slice spacing of 0.7mm. Computed Tomography simulation was performed using axial slices on a 40 slice CT with slice spacing of 0.6mm. These datasets were registered using a mutual information algorithm and localized in a stereotactic coordinate system. Image registration between the MR and CT was evaluated for each patient by a Medical Physicist to ensure accuracy. The dorsal root entry zone target was defined on the CISS MR by a Neurosurgeon and dose calculations performed on the localized CT. Treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a Radiation Oncologist and Neurosurgeon. Image guided radiosurgery was delivered using positioning tolerance of 0.5mm and 1°. Eight patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia were treated with this protocol. Results: Seven patients reported a favorable response to treatment with average Barrow Neurological Index pain score of four before treatment and one following treatment. Only one patient had a BNI>1 following treatment and review of the treatment plan revealed that the CISS MR was registered to the CT via a low resolution (5mm slice spacing) T2 MR. All other patients had CISS MR registered directly with the localized CT. This patient was retreated 6 months later using direct registration between CISS MR and localized CT and subsequently responded to treatment with a BNI of one. Conclusion: Frameless radiosurgery offers an effective solution to Trigeminal Neuralgia management provided appropriate technology and imaging protocols (utilizing submillimeter imaging) are established and maintained.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4925032},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority numbermore » was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery.« less
  • Purpose: SRS is an effective non-invasive alternative treatment modality with minimal-toxicity used to treat patients with medically/surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia root(TNR) or those who may not tolerate surgical intervention. We present our linac-based SRS procedure for TNR treatment and simultaneously report our clinical outcomes. Methods: Twenty-eight TNR-patients treated with frame-based SRS at our institution (2009–2015) with a single-fraction point-dose of 60-80Gy to TNR were included in this IRB-approved study. Experienced neurosurgeon and radiation oncologist delineated the TNR on 1.0mm thin 3D-FIESTA-MRI that was co-registered with 0.7mm thin planning-CT. Treatment plans were generated in iPlan (BrainLAB) with a 4-mm diameter conemore » using 79 arcs with differential-weighting for Novalis-TX 6MV-SRS(1000MU/min) beam and optimized to minimize brainstem dose. Winston-Lutz test was performed before each treatment delivery with sub-millimeter isocenter accuracy. Quality assurance of frame placement was maintained by helmet-bobble-measurement before simulation-CT and before patient setup at treatment couch. OBI-CBCT scan was performed for patient setup verification without applying shifts. On clinical follow up, treatment response was assessed using Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score(BNI-score:I–V). Results: 26/28 TNR-patients (16-males/10-females) who were treated with following single-fraction point-dose to isocenter: 80Gy(n=22),75Gy(n=1),70Gy(n=2) and 60Gy(n=1, re-treatment) were followed up. Median follow-up interval was 8.5-months (ranged:1–48.5months). Median age was 70-yr (ranged:43–93-yr). Right/left TNR ratio was 15/11. Delivered total # of average MUs was 19034±1204. Average beam-on-time: 19.0±1.3min. Brainstem max-dose and dose to 0.5cc were 13.3±2.4Gy (ranged:8.1–16.5Gy) and 3.6±0.4Gy (ranged:3.0–4.9Gy). On average, max-dose to optic-apparatus was ≤1.2Gy. Mean value of max-dose to eyes/lens was 0.26Gy/0.11Gy. Overall, 20-patients (77%) responded to treatment: 5(19%) achieved complete pain relief without medication (BNI score: I); 5(19%) had no-pain, decreased medication (BNI-score:II); 2(7.7%) had no-pain, but, continued medication (BNI-score:IIIA), and 8(30.8%) had pain that was well controlled by medication (BNI-score: IIIB). Six-patients (23.0%) did not respond to treatment (BNI-score:IV–V). Neither cranial nerve deficit nor radio-necrosis of temporal lobe was clinically observed. Conclusion: Linac-based SRS for medically/surgically refractory TNR provided an effective treatment option for pain resolution/control with very minimal if any normal tissue toxicity. Longer follow up of these patients is anticipated/needed to confirm our observations.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of three collimation systems, 5mm circular cone (Brainlab) and square fields of 5mm with HDMLC (Varian) and microMLC Moduleaf, Siemens) for trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Methods: A TPS Iplan v4.5 BrainLAB was used to do treatment plans for each collimations system in a square solid water phantom with isocenter at 5cm depth. Single field and treatment plan including 11 arcs with fix field and 100° gantry range was made for each collimation systems. EBT3 films were positioned at isocenter in a coronal plane to measured dose distribution for allmore » geometries. Films were digitized with a Vidar DosimetryPro Red scanner with a resolution of 89dpi and RIT113v6.1 software was used for analysis. Penumbra region (80%–20%), FWHM and dose percentage at 5mm and 10mm from CAX were determined. All profiles were normalized at CAX. Results: For single beam the penumbra (FWHM) was 1.5mm (5.3mm) for the cone, 1.9mm (5.5mm) for HDMLC and 1.8mm (5.4mm) for the microMLC. Dose percentage at 5mm was 6.9% for cone, 12.5% for HDMLC and 8.7% for the microMLC. For treatment plan the penumbra (FWHM) was 2.58mm (5.47mm) for the cone, 2.8mm (5.84mm) for HDMLC and 2.58mm (6.09mm) for the microMLC. Dose perecentage at 5mm was 13.1% for cone, 16.1% for HDMLC, 15.2% for the microMLC. Conclusion: The cone has a dose falloff larger than the microMLC and HDMLC, by its reduced penumbra, this translates into better protection of surrounding healthy tissue, however, the microMLC and HDMLC have similar accuracy to cone.« less
  • Purpose: Occipital neuralgia is a condition wherein pain is transmitted by the occipital nerves. Non-invasive therapies generally alleviate symptoms; however, persistent or recurring pain may require invasive procedures. Repeated invasive procedures upon failure are considered higher risk and are often contraindicated due to compounding inherent risk. SRS has not been explored as a treatment option largely due to the extracranial nature of the target (as opposed to the similar, more established trigeminal neuralgia), but advances in linear-accelerator frameless-based SRS now present an opportunity to evaluate the novel potential of this modality for this application. Methods: Patient presented with severe occipitalmore » pain following decompression and fusion of the cervical vertebrae with prior intervention attempted via radiofrequency ablation yielding temporary pain cessation. A 0.6 mm slice spacing CT was obtained for treatment planning, and a cervical spine oriented 1.0 mm slice spacing CT myelogram was obtained for the purpose of defining the targeted C2 occipital dorsal root ganglion (to receive 80 Gy to the isocenter) and spinal cord. Results: The spinal cord was most proximally 12.0 mm from the isocenter receiving a maximum dose of 3.36 Gy, and doses to 0.35 and 1.2 cc of 1.84 Gy and 0.79 Gy, respectively. The brain maximum dose was 2.29 Gy. The treatment was successfully performed with a NovalisTX (Varian) equipped with ExacTrac stereoscopic x-ray image guidance (BrainLAB). Treatment time was 59 minutes for 18,323 MUs. Imaging was performed prior to each arc delivery resulting in twenty-one imaging sessions (twelve requiring positional corrections with the remaining verified within tolerance). The average deviation magnitude requiring a positional or rotational correction was 0.96±0.25 mm, 0.8±0.41° while the average deviation magnitude deemed within tolerance was 0.41±0.12 mm, 0.57±0.28°. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-based frameless radiosurgery provides an accurate, non-invasive alternative for treating occipital neuralgia where an invasive procedure is contraindicated.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how the spatial relationship between the isocenters of the first and second radiosurgeries affects the overall outcome. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study on 40 patients who had repeat gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Only one 4-mm isocenter was applied in both first and second radiosurgeries, with a maximum radiation dose of 75 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. The MR scan of the first radiosurgery was registered to that of the second radiosurgery by a landmark-based registration algorithm. The spatial relationship between the isocenter of the first andmore » the second radiosurgeries was thus determined. The investigating parameters were the distance between the isocenters of the two separate radiosurgeries and isocenter proximity to the brainstem. The outcome end points were pain relief and dysesthesias. The median follow-up for the repeat radiosurgery was 28 months (range, 6-51 months). Results: Pain relief was complete in 11 patients, nearly complete ({>=}90%) in 7 patients, partial ({>=}50%) in 8 patients, and minimal (<50%) or none in another 14 patients. The mean distance between the two isocenters was 2.86 mm in the complete or nearly complete pain relief group vs. 1.93 mm in the others. Farther distance between isocenters was associated with a trend toward better pain relief (p 0.057). The proximity of the second isocenter to the brainstem did not affect pain relief, and neither did placing the second isocenter proximal or distal to the brainstem compared with the first one. Three patients developed moderate dysesthesias (score of 4 on a 0-10 scale), and 2 other patients developed more significant dysesthesias (score of 7) after the second radiosurgery. Dysesthesias related neither to distance between isocenters nor to which isocenter was closer to the brainstem. Conclusions: Image registration between MR scans of the first and second radiosurgeries helps target delineation and radiosurgery treatment planning. Increasing the isocenter distance between the two radiosurgeries treated a longer segment of the trigeminal neuralgia nerve and was associated with a trend toward improved pain relief.« less