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Title: SU-E-T-651: Quantification of Dosimetric Accuracy of Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy delivery using dynamic thorax phantom. Methods: Three patients with mobile target (2 lung, 1liver) were chosen. Retrospective 4DCT image sets were acquired for using Varian RPM system. An in-house MATLAB program was designed for MIP, MinIP and AvgIP generation. ITV was contoured on MIP image set for lung patients and on MinIP for liver patient. Dynamic IMRT plans were generated on selected phase bin image set in Eclipse (v10.0) planning system. CIRS dynamic thorax phantom was used to perform the dosimetric quality assurance. Patient breathing pattern file from RPM system was converted to phantom compatible file by an in-house MATLAB program. This respiratory pattern fed to the CIRS dynamic thorax phantom. 4DCT image set was acquired for this phantom using patient breathing pattern. Verification plans were generated using patient gating window and delivered on the phantom. Measurements were carried out using with ion chamber and EBT2 film. Exposed films were analyzed and evaluated in FilmQA software. Results: The stability of gated output in comparison with un-gated output was within 0.5%. The Ion chamber measured and TPS calculated dose compared for all the patients. The difference observed wasmore » 0.45%, −0.52% and −0.54 for Patient 1, Patient2 and Patient 3 respectively.Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows pass rates from 92.41% to 99.93% for 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement criteria. Conclusion: Dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated SBRT delivery for lung and liver was dosimetrically acceptable. The Ion chamber measured dose was within 0.203±0.5659% of the expected dose. Gamma pass rates were within 96.63±3.84% of the expected dose.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]; ;  [4]
  1. Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)
  2. VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)
  3. Nayati Healathcare and Research Pvt Ltd, Mathura, Uttar pradesh (India)
  4. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22538160
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; CHEST; COMPUTER CODES; FILM DOSIMETRY; IMAGES; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; LIVER; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Thiyagarajan, Rajesh, Vikraman, S, Maragathaveni, S, Dhivya, N, Kataria, Tejinder, Nambiraj, N Arunai, Sigamani, Ashokkumar, Sinha, Sujit Nath, Yadav, Girigesh, and Raman, Kothanda. SU-E-T-651: Quantification of Dosimetric Accuracy of Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4925014.
Thiyagarajan, Rajesh, Vikraman, S, Maragathaveni, S, Dhivya, N, Kataria, Tejinder, Nambiraj, N Arunai, Sigamani, Ashokkumar, Sinha, Sujit Nath, Yadav, Girigesh, & Raman, Kothanda. SU-E-T-651: Quantification of Dosimetric Accuracy of Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925014.
Thiyagarajan, Rajesh, Vikraman, S, Maragathaveni, S, Dhivya, N, Kataria, Tejinder, Nambiraj, N Arunai, Sigamani, Ashokkumar, Sinha, Sujit Nath, Yadav, Girigesh, and Raman, Kothanda. Mon . "SU-E-T-651: Quantification of Dosimetric Accuracy of Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925014.
@article{osti_22538160,
title = {SU-E-T-651: Quantification of Dosimetric Accuracy of Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy},
author = {Thiyagarajan, Rajesh and Vikraman, S and Maragathaveni, S and Dhivya, N and Kataria, Tejinder and Nambiraj, N Arunai and Sigamani, Ashokkumar and Sinha, Sujit Nath and Yadav, Girigesh and Raman, Kothanda},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy delivery using dynamic thorax phantom. Methods: Three patients with mobile target (2 lung, 1liver) were chosen. Retrospective 4DCT image sets were acquired for using Varian RPM system. An in-house MATLAB program was designed for MIP, MinIP and AvgIP generation. ITV was contoured on MIP image set for lung patients and on MinIP for liver patient. Dynamic IMRT plans were generated on selected phase bin image set in Eclipse (v10.0) planning system. CIRS dynamic thorax phantom was used to perform the dosimetric quality assurance. Patient breathing pattern file from RPM system was converted to phantom compatible file by an in-house MATLAB program. This respiratory pattern fed to the CIRS dynamic thorax phantom. 4DCT image set was acquired for this phantom using patient breathing pattern. Verification plans were generated using patient gating window and delivered on the phantom. Measurements were carried out using with ion chamber and EBT2 film. Exposed films were analyzed and evaluated in FilmQA software. Results: The stability of gated output in comparison with un-gated output was within 0.5%. The Ion chamber measured and TPS calculated dose compared for all the patients. The difference observed was 0.45%, −0.52% and −0.54 for Patient 1, Patient2 and Patient 3 respectively.Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows pass rates from 92.41% to 99.93% for 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement criteria. Conclusion: Dosimetric accuracy of respiratory gated SBRT delivery for lung and liver was dosimetrically acceptable. The Ion chamber measured dose was within 0.203±0.5659% of the expected dose. Gamma pass rates were within 96.63±3.84% of the expected dose.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4925014},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Existing reports on gated radiation therapy focus mainly on optimizing dose delivery to the target structure. This work investigates the motion effects on radiation dose delivered to organs at risk (OAR) in respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A new algorithmic tool of dose analysis is developed to evaluate the optimality of gating phase for dose sparing on OARs while ensuring adequate target coverage. Methods: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer were treated on a phase I prospective study employing 4DCT-based SBRT. For each patient, 4DCT scans are acquired and sorted into 10 respiratory phases (inhale-exhale- inhale). Treatment planningmore » is performed on the average CT image. The average CT is spatially registered to other phases. The resultant displacement field is then applied on the plan dose map to estimate the actual dose map for each phase. Dose values of each voxel are fitted to a sinusoidal function. Fitting parameters of dose variation, mean delivered dose and optimal gating phase for each voxel over respiration cycle are mapped on the dose volume. Results: The sinusoidal function accurately models the dose change during respiratory motion (mean fitting error 4.6%). In the eight patients, mean dose variation is 3.3 Gy on OARs with maximum of 13.7 Gy. Two patients have about 100cm{sup 3} volumes covered by more than 5 Gy deviation. The mean delivered dose maps are similar to plan dose with slight deformation. The optimal gating phase highly varies across the patient, with phase 5 or 6 on about 60% of the volume, and phase 0 on most of the rest. Conclusion: A new algorithmic tool is developed to conveniently quantify dose deviation on OARs from plan dose during the respiratory cycle. The proposed software facilitates the treatment planning process by providing the optimal respiratory gating phase for dose sparing on each OAR.« less
  • Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected formore » the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate performance of three commercially available treatment planning systems for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using the following algorithms: Boltzmann transport equation based algorithm (AcurosXB AXB), convolution based algorithm Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA); and Monte Carlo based algorithm (XVMC). Methods: A total of 10 patients with early stage non-small cell peripheral lung cancer were included. The initial clinical plans were generated using the XVMC based treatment planning system with a prescription of 54Gy in 3 fractions following RTOG0613 protocol. The plans were recalculated with the same beam parameters and monitor units using AAA and AXBmore » algorithms. A calculation grid size of 2mm was used for all algorithms. The dose distribution, conformity, and dosimetric parameters for the targets and organs at risk (OAR) are compared between the algorithms. Results: The average PTV volume was 19.6mL (range 4.2–47.2mL). The volume of PTV covered by the prescribed dose (PTV-V100) were 93.97±2.00%, 95.07±2.07% and 95.10±2.97% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms, respectively. There was no significant difference in high dose conformity index; however, XVMC predicted slightly higher values (p=0.04) for the ratio of 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R50%). The percentage volume of total lungs receiving dose >20Gy (LungV20Gy) were 4.03±2.26%, 3.86±2.22% and 3.85±2.21% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms. Examination of dose volume histograms (DVH) revealed small differences in targets and OARs for most patients. However, the AAA algorithm was found to predict considerable higher PTV coverage compared with AXB and XVMC algorithms in two cases. The dose difference was found to be primarily located at the periphery region of the target. Conclusion: For clinical SBRT lung treatment planning, the dosimetric differences between three commercially available algorithms are generally small except at target periphery. XVMC and AXB algorithms are recommended for accurate dose estimation at tissue boundaries.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the feasibility of treating lung SBRT patients with the ipsilateral arm adducted beside the body instead of elevated above the head. Methods: Patients receiving lung SBRT at our institution are typically treated with both arms raised above their head. However, several patients had difficulty maintaining their arms in an elevated position. In this study, lung SBRT patients who underwent PET-CT imaging with an adducted ipsilateral arm were selected to investigate the dosimetric effects of this treatment setup. PET-CT datasets were fused with treatment planning CT images to simulate the adducted arm position. One VMAT treatment plan wasmore » created per patient using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Plans were optimized to achieve minimal dose to the ipsilateral arm while keeping the target coverage and critical structure doses within clinical limits. The target dose coverage, conformity index (CI) for the target, and DVHs of critical structures for the adducted arm plan were calculated. These parameters were compared with the clinical plan and reported along with the mean and maximum doses of the ipsilateral arm. Results: The target coverage, CI and DVHs for the adducted arm plans of two patients (one with peripheral lesion and one with central lesion) were comparable with the clinical plans. Dose constraints for the chest wall limited further reduction of ipsilateral arm doses for the peripheral lesion plan. The mean ipsilateral arm doses for the central and peripheral lesions were 0.33 Gy and 2.4 Gy, respectively. The maximum ipsilateral arm doses for the central and peripheral lesions were 1.0 Gy and 6.2 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggested patients with central lung SBRT tumors were more suitable for treatment with the adducted arm position. More patients with various lung tumor locations will be studied to find optimal tumor locations for treatment with this arm position.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the choice of fixed margin or online adaptation when treating intermediate-risk prostate cancer including seminal vesicles (SV) using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: 9 prostate SBRT patients were retrospectively studied. All patients were implanted with fiducial markers in the prostate for daily localization and verification. Each patient had 5 pairs of pre-treatment and post-treatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) per protocol. SVs were contoured on planning CT and all CBCTs by one attending physician. Simultaneous integral boost (SIB) IMRT plans were developed to deliver 25Gy/5fx to the SV while delivering 37Gy/5fx to the prostate. A 3mm isotropic marginmore » was added to the prostate while a 5 mm isotropic margin was used for the SV. The planning CT was registered to daily pre-treatment and post-treatment CBCT based on fiducial markers in the prostate to mimic online prostate localization; and the SV on daily CBCT was transferred to the CT structure set after the prostates were aligned. Daily pre-treatment and post-treatment SV dose coverage and the organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing were evaluated for the SIB regimen. At least 95% of the SV need to receive the prescription dose (5Gy per fraction). Results: For the total of 90 daily SVs analyzed (ten CBCTs for each of nine patients), only 45 daily SVs (50%) were able to meet the coverage that 95% of the SV received 25Gy. The OAR sparing performance was acceptable for most of the dosimetric constraints in low-risk prostate SBRT protocol with only two exceptions in bladder V100 (cc). Conclusion: A fixed 5mm margin for SV is not sufficient to provide consistent daily dose coverage due to SV’s substantial inter- and intra-fractional motion relative to the prostate. This finding calls for innovative strategies in margin design as well as online treatment adaptation. This work is partially supported a master research grant from Varian Medical Systems.« less