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Title: SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement

Abstract

Purpose: Establish a procedure for beam steering and profile measurement using a 2D ionization chamber array and show equivalence to a water scanning system. Methods: Multiple photon beams (30×30cm{sup 2} field) and electron beams (25×25cm{sup 2} cone) were steered in the radial and transverse directions using Sun Nuclear’s IC PROFILER (ICP). Solid water was added during steering to ensure measurements were beyond the buildup region. With steering complete, servos were zeroed and enabled. Photon profiles were collected in a 30×30cm{sup 2} field at dmax and 2.9 cm depth for flattened and FFF beams respectively. Electron profiles were collected with a 25×25cm{sup 2} cone and effective depth (solid water + 0.9 cm intrinsic buildup) as follows: 0.9 cm (6e), 1.9 cm (9e), 2.9 cm (12e, 16e, 20e). Profiles of the same energy, field size and depth were measured in water with Sun Nuclear’s 3D SCANNER (3DS). Profiles were re-measured using the ICP after the in-water scans. Profiles measured using the ICP and 3DS were compared by (a) examining the differences in Varian’s “Point Difference Symmetry” metric, (b) visual inspection of the overlaid profile shapes and (c) calculation of point-by-point differences. Results: Comparing ICP measurements before and after water scanning showed verymore » good agreement indicating good stability of the linac and measurement system. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using Varian’s symmetry metric showed agreement within 0.5% for all beams. The average magnitude of the agreement was within 0.2%. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using point-by-point difference showed agreement within 0.5% inside of 80% area of the field width. Conclusion: Profile agreement to within 0.5% was observed between ICP and 3DS after steering multiple energies with the ICP. This indicates that the ICP may be used for steering electron beams, and both flattened and FFF photon beams. Song Gao: Sun Nuclear’s invitation of speak and financial support for attending the 8th QA & Dosimetry Symposium in Orlando, Florida 2015.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)
  2. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  3. Sun Nuclear Inc., Melbourne, FL (Australia)
  4. Sun Nuclear Corp, Melbourne, FL (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22538154
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; ELECTRON BEAMS; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PHANTOMS; PHOTON BEAMS; WATER

Citation Formats

Gao, S, Balter, P, Rose, M, and Simon, W. SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4925008.
Gao, S, Balter, P, Rose, M, & Simon, W. SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925008.
Gao, S, Balter, P, Rose, M, and Simon, W. Mon . "SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4925008.
@article{osti_22538154,
title = {SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement},
author = {Gao, S and Balter, P and Rose, M and Simon, W},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Establish a procedure for beam steering and profile measurement using a 2D ionization chamber array and show equivalence to a water scanning system. Methods: Multiple photon beams (30×30cm{sup 2} field) and electron beams (25×25cm{sup 2} cone) were steered in the radial and transverse directions using Sun Nuclear’s IC PROFILER (ICP). Solid water was added during steering to ensure measurements were beyond the buildup region. With steering complete, servos were zeroed and enabled. Photon profiles were collected in a 30×30cm{sup 2} field at dmax and 2.9 cm depth for flattened and FFF beams respectively. Electron profiles were collected with a 25×25cm{sup 2} cone and effective depth (solid water + 0.9 cm intrinsic buildup) as follows: 0.9 cm (6e), 1.9 cm (9e), 2.9 cm (12e, 16e, 20e). Profiles of the same energy, field size and depth were measured in water with Sun Nuclear’s 3D SCANNER (3DS). Profiles were re-measured using the ICP after the in-water scans. Profiles measured using the ICP and 3DS were compared by (a) examining the differences in Varian’s “Point Difference Symmetry” metric, (b) visual inspection of the overlaid profile shapes and (c) calculation of point-by-point differences. Results: Comparing ICP measurements before and after water scanning showed very good agreement indicating good stability of the linac and measurement system. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using Varian’s symmetry metric showed agreement within 0.5% for all beams. The average magnitude of the agreement was within 0.2%. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using point-by-point difference showed agreement within 0.5% inside of 80% area of the field width. Conclusion: Profile agreement to within 0.5% was observed between ICP and 3DS after steering multiple energies with the ICP. This indicates that the ICP may be used for steering electron beams, and both flattened and FFF photon beams. Song Gao: Sun Nuclear’s invitation of speak and financial support for attending the 8th QA & Dosimetry Symposium in Orlando, Florida 2015.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4925008},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}