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Title: SU-E-T-624: Portal Dosimetry Commissioning of Multiple (6) Varian TrueBeam Linacs Equipped with PortalVision DMI MV Imager

Abstract

Purpose: To show that a single model for Portal Domisetry (PD) can be established for beam-matched TrueBeam™ linacs that are equipped with the DMI imager (43×43cm effective area). Methods: Our department acquired 6 new TrueBeam™s, 4 “Slim” and 2 “Edge” models. The Slims were equipped with 6 and 10MV photons, and the Edges with 6MV. MLCs differed between the Slims and Edges (Millennium 120 vs HD-MLC respectively). PD model was created from data acquired using a single linac (Slim). This includes maximum field size profile, as well as output factors and acquired measured fluence using the DMI imager. All identical linacs were beam-matched, profiles were within 1% at maximum field size at a variety of depths. The profile correction file was generated from 40×40 profile acquired at 5cm depth, 95cm SSD, and was adjusted for deviation at the field edges and corners. The PD model and profile correction was applied to all six TrueBeam™s and imagers. A variety of jaw only and sliding window (SW) MLC test fields, as well as TG-119 and clinical SW and VMAT plans were run on each linac to validate the model. Results: For 6X and 10X, field by field comparison using 3mm/3% absolute gammamore » criteria passed 90% or better for all cases. This was also true for composite comparisons of TG-199 and clinical plans, matching our current department criteria. Conclusion: Using a single model per photon energy for PD for the TrueBeam™ equipped with a DMI imager can produce clinically acceptable results across multiple identical and matched linacs. It is also possible to use the same PD model despite different MLCs. This can save time during commissioning and software updates.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. OH State University, Columbus, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22538133
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COLLIMATORS; COMMISSIONING; COMPUTER CODES; DOSIMETRY; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Weldon, M, DiCostanzo, D, Grzetic, S, and Hessler, J. SU-E-T-624: Portal Dosimetry Commissioning of Multiple (6) Varian TrueBeam Linacs Equipped with PortalVision DMI MV Imager. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924987.
Weldon, M, DiCostanzo, D, Grzetic, S, & Hessler, J. SU-E-T-624: Portal Dosimetry Commissioning of Multiple (6) Varian TrueBeam Linacs Equipped with PortalVision DMI MV Imager. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924987.
Weldon, M, DiCostanzo, D, Grzetic, S, and Hessler, J. Mon . "SU-E-T-624: Portal Dosimetry Commissioning of Multiple (6) Varian TrueBeam Linacs Equipped with PortalVision DMI MV Imager". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924987.
@article{osti_22538133,
title = {SU-E-T-624: Portal Dosimetry Commissioning of Multiple (6) Varian TrueBeam Linacs Equipped with PortalVision DMI MV Imager},
author = {Weldon, M and DiCostanzo, D and Grzetic, S and Hessler, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To show that a single model for Portal Domisetry (PD) can be established for beam-matched TrueBeam™ linacs that are equipped with the DMI imager (43×43cm effective area). Methods: Our department acquired 6 new TrueBeam™s, 4 “Slim” and 2 “Edge” models. The Slims were equipped with 6 and 10MV photons, and the Edges with 6MV. MLCs differed between the Slims and Edges (Millennium 120 vs HD-MLC respectively). PD model was created from data acquired using a single linac (Slim). This includes maximum field size profile, as well as output factors and acquired measured fluence using the DMI imager. All identical linacs were beam-matched, profiles were within 1% at maximum field size at a variety of depths. The profile correction file was generated from 40×40 profile acquired at 5cm depth, 95cm SSD, and was adjusted for deviation at the field edges and corners. The PD model and profile correction was applied to all six TrueBeam™s and imagers. A variety of jaw only and sliding window (SW) MLC test fields, as well as TG-119 and clinical SW and VMAT plans were run on each linac to validate the model. Results: For 6X and 10X, field by field comparison using 3mm/3% absolute gamma criteria passed 90% or better for all cases. This was also true for composite comparisons of TG-199 and clinical plans, matching our current department criteria. Conclusion: Using a single model per photon energy for PD for the TrueBeam™ equipped with a DMI imager can produce clinically acceptable results across multiple identical and matched linacs. It is also possible to use the same PD model despite different MLCs. This can save time during commissioning and software updates.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924987},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methodsmore » - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems Inc.Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.« less
  • Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (2×2,4×4,10×10cm{sup 2}) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted inmore » each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10 hours). The scripting also allowed for creation of the files in advance without requiring access to TPS. The API scripting functionality enabled efficient creation/mining of TPS data. Finally, automation reduces the potential for human error in entering linac values at the machine console,and the script provides a log of measurements acquired for each session. This research was supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this work is the characterization of a new Varian TrueBeam™ facility in terms of neutron production, in order to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs during radiotherapy treatments. Methods: The existing methodology [1] was used with the reference SRAMnd detector, calibrated in terms of thermal neutron fluence at the reference field operated by PTB (Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt) at the GeNF (Geesthacht-Neutron-Facility) with the GKSS reactor FRG-1 [2]. Thermal neutron fluence for the 5 available possibilities was evaluated: 15 MV and 10&6 MV with and without Flattening Filter (FF and FFF, respectively). Irradiation conditions are as described in [3].more » In addition, three different collimator-MLC configurations were studied for 15 MV: (a) collimator of 10×10 cm{sup 2} and MLC fully retracted (reference), (b) field sizes of 20×20 cm{sup 2} and 10×10 cm{sup 2} for collimator and MLC respectively, and (c) collimator and MLC aperture of 10×10 cm{sup 2}. Results: Thermal fluence rate at the “reference point” [3], as a consequence of the neutron production, obtained for (a) conformation in 15 MV is (1.45±0.11) x10{sup 4} n•cm{sup 2}/MU. Configurations (b) and (c) gave fluences of 96.6% and 97.8% of the reference (a). Neutron production decreases up to 8.6% and 5.7% for the 10 MV FF and FFF beams, respectively. Finally, it decreases up to 2.8% and 0.1% for the 6 MV FF and FFF modes, respectively. Conclusion: This work evaluates thermal neutron production of Varian TrueBeam™ system for organ equivalent dose estimation. The small difference in collimator-MLC configuration shows the universality of the methodology [3]. A decrease in this production is shown when decreasing energy from 15 to 10 MV and an almost negligible production was found for 6 MV. Moreover, a lower neutron contribution is observed for the FFF modes.[1]Phys Med Biol,2012;57:6167–6191.[2]Radiat Meas,2010;45:1513–1517.[3]Med Phys,2015;42:276–281.« less
  • Purpose: Many times a set of multiple Varian-Truebeam (TB) linacs are acquired by an institution. Since “beam matching” is an important requirement for many facilities, we developed a strategy to perform a “simultaneous” commissioning between multiple linacs.Methods and Materials: We first commissioned the required photon beam data for eclipse on the 1st TB for all the energy modalities with a beam scanning system, while integrated measurements for output factors, of all field sizes (from 1×1 to 40×40cm{sup 2}) were conducted on the 2nd TB. Care was exercised during small field dosimetry so the appropriate detectors were used with data takenmore » between two detectors be “linked” to a larger field size (4×4cm{sup 2}) with the “daisy-chaining” technique via: OF=[M-PTW(fs)×(M-PTW(4×4))-1]×[MA12s(4×4)×(M-A12S(10×10))−1]. For all energy modalities, data that span the entire range of field size, was repeated on the next TB linac, for verification. The primarily energy-dependent dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) which was measured separately on each TB. The modeled data was validated with special measurements conducted on both linacs during commissioning. Results: Our data agreed with the “TB representative beam data” to within 0.5% for all energy modalities and field sizes ≥3×3cm2. Sample depth-doses and cross-profiles of a 3×3cm2 between the linacs agreeing to within 1% between linacs. The measured DLGs were quite different with a uniform difference of 1.3% between the two linacs. The measured DLG values are independent of the average dose rate and medium used for the measurements. Conclusion: A comprehensive method of commissioning identical Varian-TB linacs, outlining the critical issues, especially small field dosimetry and DLG. The dosimetric effect of different DLG values, when it comes to, dynamic delivery and data comparisons will be presented. The dependence of DLG value on the measurement medium (in-air vs. water) or dose rate used will also be discussed. This work was supported by CAMC Cancer Center and Alliance Oncology.« less
  • Purpose: To assess if the TrueBeam HD120 collimator is delivering small IMRT fields accurately and consistently throughout the course of treatment using the SunNuclear PerFraction software. Methods: 7-field IMRT plans for 8 canine patients who passed IMRT QA using SunNuclear Mapcheck DQA were selected for this study. The animals were setup using CBCT image guidance. The EPID fluence maps were captured for each treatment field and each treatment fraction, with the first fraction EPID data serving as the baseline for comparison. The Sun Nuclear PerFraction Software was used to compare the EPID data for subsequent fractions using a Gamma (3%/3mm)more » pass rate of 90%. To simulate requirements for SRS, the data was reanalyzed using a Gamma (3%/1mm) pass rate of 90%. Low-dose, low- and high gradient thresholds were used to focus the analysis on clinically relevant parts of the dose distribution. Results: Not all fractions could be analyzed, because during some of the treatment courses the DICOM tags in the EPID images intermittently change from CU to US (unspecified), which would indicate a temporary loss of EPID calibration. This technical issue is still being investigated. For the remaining fractions, the vast majority (7/8 of patients, 95% of fractions, and 96.6% of fields) are passing the less stringent Gamma criteria. The more stringent Gamma criteria caused a drop in pass rate (90 % of fractions, 84% of fields). For the patient with the lowest pass rate, wet towel bolus was used. Another patient with low pass rates experienced masseter muscle wasting. Conclusion: EPID dosimetry using the PerFraction software demonstrated that the majority of fields passed a Gamma (3%/3mm) for IMRT treatments delivered with a TrueBeam HD120 MLC. Pass rates dropped for a DTA of 1mm to model SRS tolerances. PerFraction pass rates can flag missing bolus or internal shields. Sanjeev Saini is an employee of Sun Nuclear Corporation. For this study, a pre-release version of PerFRACTION 1.1 software from Sun Nuclear Corporation was used.« less