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Title: SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the polarity effects for small volume ionization chambers in {sup 60}Co gamma-ray beams using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Measurements were made for 7 small volume ionization chambers (a PTW 31016, an Exradin A14, 2 Capintec PR0-5P, and 3 Exradin A16) using a PTW UNIDOSwebline Universal Dosemeter and an ELEKTA solid water phantom with proper inserts. For each ion chamber, the temperature/pressure corrected electric charge readings were obtained for 16 voltage values (±50V, ±100V, ±200V, ±300V, ±400V, ±500V, ±600V, ±700V). For each voltage, a five-minute leakage charge reading and a series of 2-minute readings were continuously taken during irradiation until 5 stable signals (less than 0.05% variation) were obtained. The average of the 5 reading was then used for the calculation of the polarity corrections at the voltage and for generating the saturation curves. Results: The polarity effects are more pronounced at high or low voltages than at the medium voltages for all chambers studied. The voltage dependence of the 3 Exradin A16 chambers is similar in shape. The polarity corrections for the Exradin A16 chambers changes rapidly from about 1 at 500V to about 0.98 at 700V. The polarity corrections for the 7 ion chambersmore » at 300V are in the range from 0.9925 (for the PTW31016) to 1.0035 (for an Exradin A16). Conclusion: The polarity corrections for certain micro-chambers are large even at normal operating voltage.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22538132
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BEAMS; COBALT 60; CORRECTIONS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; GAMMA RADIATION; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; PHANTOMS

Citation Formats

Xu, Y, Bhatnagar, J, and Huq, M Saiful. SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924986.
Xu, Y, Bhatnagar, J, & Huq, M Saiful. SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924986.
Xu, Y, Bhatnagar, J, and Huq, M Saiful. Mon . "SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924986.
@article{osti_22538132,
title = {SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams},
author = {Xu, Y and Bhatnagar, J and Huq, M Saiful},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the polarity effects for small volume ionization chambers in {sup 60}Co gamma-ray beams using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Measurements were made for 7 small volume ionization chambers (a PTW 31016, an Exradin A14, 2 Capintec PR0-5P, and 3 Exradin A16) using a PTW UNIDOSwebline Universal Dosemeter and an ELEKTA solid water phantom with proper inserts. For each ion chamber, the temperature/pressure corrected electric charge readings were obtained for 16 voltage values (±50V, ±100V, ±200V, ±300V, ±400V, ±500V, ±600V, ±700V). For each voltage, a five-minute leakage charge reading and a series of 2-minute readings were continuously taken during irradiation until 5 stable signals (less than 0.05% variation) were obtained. The average of the 5 reading was then used for the calculation of the polarity corrections at the voltage and for generating the saturation curves. Results: The polarity effects are more pronounced at high or low voltages than at the medium voltages for all chambers studied. The voltage dependence of the 3 Exradin A16 chambers is similar in shape. The polarity corrections for the Exradin A16 chambers changes rapidly from about 1 at 500V to about 0.98 at 700V. The polarity corrections for the 7 ion chambers at 300V are in the range from 0.9925 (for the PTW31016) to 1.0035 (for an Exradin A16). Conclusion: The polarity corrections for certain micro-chambers are large even at normal operating voltage.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924986},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Dosimetric quantities such as the polarity correction factor (Ppol) are important parameters for determining the absorbed dose and can influence the choice of dosimeter. Ppol has been shown to depend on beam energy, chamber design, and field size. This study is to investigate the field size and detector orientation dependence of Ppol in small fields for several commercially available micro-chambers. Methods: We evaluate the Exradin A26, Exradin A16, PTW 31014, PTW 31016, and two prototype IBA CC-01 micro-chambers in both horizontal and vertical orientations. Measurements were taken at 10cm depth and 100cm SSD in a Wellhofer BluePhantom2. Measurements weremore » made at square fields of 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 2.0, 2.4, 3.0, and 5.0 cm on each side using 6MV with both ± 300VDC biases. PPol was evaluated as described in TG-51, reported using −300VDC bias for Mraw. Ratios of PPol measured in the clinical field to the reference field are presented. Results: A field size dependence of Ppol was observed for all chambers, with increased variations when mounted vertically. The maximum variation observed in PPol over all chambers mounted horizontally was <1%, and occurred at different field sizes for different chambers. Vertically mounted chambers demonstrated variations as large as 3.2%, always at the smallest field sizes. Conclusion: Large variations in Ppol were observed for vertically mounted chambers compared to horizontal mountings. Horizontal mountings demonstrated a complicated relationship between polarity variation and field size, probably relating to differing details in each chambers construction. Vertically mounted chambers consistently demonstrated the largest PPol variations for the smallest field sizes. Measurements obtained with a horizontal mounting appear to not need significant polarity corrections for relative measurements, while those obtained using a vertical mounting should be corrected for variations in PPol.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 andmore » 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)« less
  • Purpose: To correct for the over-response of mini-ionization chambers with high-Z central electrodes. The hypothesis is that by applying a negative/reverse voltage, it is possible to suppress the signal generated in the high-Z central electrode by low-energy photons. Methods: The mini-ionization chambers used in the experiments were a PTW-31014, PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01. The PTW-31014 has an aluminum central electrode while the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01 have a steel one. Total scatter factors (Scp) were measured for a 6 MV photon beam down to a square field size of 0.5 cm. The measurements were performed in water at 10 cm depth withmore » SAD of 100 cm. The Scp were measured with the dosimeters with +400V bias voltage. In the case of the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01, the measurements were repeated with −400V bias voltage. Also, the field factors in water were calculated with Monte Carlo simulations for comparison. Results: The measured Scp at +400V with the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01 detectors were in agreement within 0.2% down to a field size of 1.5 cm. Both dosimeters shown a systematic difference about 2.5% with the Scp measured with the PTW-31014 and the Monte Carlo calculated field factors. The measured Scp at −400V with the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01 detectors were in close agreement with the PTW-31014 measured Scp and the field factors within 0.3 and 1.0%, respectively. In the case of the IBA-CC01 it was found a good agreement (1%) down to field size of 1.0 cm. All the dosimeters shown differences up to 17% between the measured Scp and the field factor for the 0.5 cm field size. Conclusion: By applying a negative/reverse voltage to the mini-ionization chambers with high-Z central electrode it was possible to correct for their over-response to low energy photons.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffermore » RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.« less
  • Purpose: Ionization chambers in electron radiation fields are known to exhibit polarity effects due to Compton currents. Previously we have presented a unique manifestation of this effect observed with a microionization chamber. We have expanded that investigation to include three micro-ionization chambers commonly used in radiation therapy. The purpose of this project is to determine what factors influence this polarity effect for micro-chambers and how it might be mitigated. Methods: Three chambers were utilized: a PTW 31016, an Exradin A-16, and an Exradin A- 26. Beam profile scans were obtained on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator in combination with amore » Wellhofer water phantom for 6, 9, and 12 MeV electrons. Profiles were obtained parallel and perpendicular to the chamber's long axis, with both positive and negative collecting bias. Profiles were obtained with various chamber components shielded by 5 mm of Pb at 6 MeV to determine their relative contributions to this polarity effect. Results: The polarity effect was observed for all three chambers, and the ratio of the polarity effect for the Exradin chambers is proportional to the ratio of chamber volumes. Shielding the stem of both Exradin chambers diminished, but did not remove the polarity effect. However, they demonstrated no out-of-field effect when the cable was shielded with Pb. The PTW chamber demonstrated a significantly reduced polarity effect without any shielding despite its comparable volume with the A-26. Conclusions: The sensitive volume of these micro-chambers is relatively insensitive to collecting polarity. However, charge deposition within the cable can dramatically alter measured ionization profiles. This is demonstrated by the removal of the out-of-field ionization when the cable is shielded for the Exradin chambers. We strongly recommend analyzing any polarity dependence for small-volume chambers used in characterization of electron fields.« less