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Title: Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community

Abstract

For over two decades, Boom Clay has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. Today, also the microbiological properties and the possibility of microbes interacting with radionuclides or repository components including the waste form, in a host formation like Boom Clay are considered [2,3]. In the past, a reference composition for synthetic Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) was derived, based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay [1]. Similarly, the primary aim of this microbiological study was to determine the core BCPW bacterial community and identify representative water samples for future microbial directed lab experiments. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by microscopy and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant micro-organisms. (authors)

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Society of Mechanical Engineers - ASME, Nuclear Engineering Division, Environmental Engineering Division, Two Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22535215
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ICEM2013 - ASME 2013: 15. International Conference on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste Management, Brussels (Belgium), 8-12 Sep 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France; 8 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; BOOM CLAY; GEOCHEMISTRY; INTERSTITIAL WATER; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOISOTOPES

Citation Formats

Wouters, Katinka, Moors, Hugo, and Leys, Natalie. Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1115/ICEM2013-96222.
Wouters, Katinka, Moors, Hugo, & Leys, Natalie. Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community. United States. doi:10.1115/ICEM2013-96222.
Wouters, Katinka, Moors, Hugo, and Leys, Natalie. Mon . "Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community". United States. doi:10.1115/ICEM2013-96222.
@article{osti_22535215,
title = {Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community},
author = {Wouters, Katinka and Moors, Hugo and Leys, Natalie},
abstractNote = {For over two decades, Boom Clay has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. Today, also the microbiological properties and the possibility of microbes interacting with radionuclides or repository components including the waste form, in a host formation like Boom Clay are considered [2,3]. In the past, a reference composition for synthetic Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) was derived, based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay [1]. Similarly, the primary aim of this microbiological study was to determine the core BCPW bacterial community and identify representative water samples for future microbial directed lab experiments. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by microscopy and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant micro-organisms. (authors)},
doi = {10.1115/ICEM2013-96222},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
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  • The corrosion behavior under repository conditions is an important issue in the selection of a container material for the deep-geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. In considering corrosion resistant materials for the containers, attention has to be focused on localized corrosion. Therefore, cyclic potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to investigate the pitting behavior of a number of candidate materials, including stainless steels AISI 316L, AISI 316L hMo, AISI 316Ti, higher alloyed stainless steels UNS N08904 and UNS N08926, nickel alloy UNS N96455, and titanium alloy UNS R52400. The environment considered was synthetic oxidized Boom clay water at a temperature ofmore » 90 C and with varying chloride content. UNS N96455 and UNS R52400 did not show any pitting corrosion at chloride concentrations up to 10,000 ppm. UNS N08926 was resistant to pitting at 100 and 1,000 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}. The other alloys suffered minor or no pitting attack in the reference solution containing 100 ppm chloride, but were attacked at elevated chloride concentrations. A SEM study of the pit morphology on AISI 316L hMo and UHB 904 revealed large central pits surrounded by minor satellite pits, resulting in a rose shape. This morphology probably resulted from subsurface pit growth, where the pit was covered by a thin layer of metal.« less
  • Static dissolution experiments were performed with unirradiated UO{sub 2} in Boom Clay water. The objectives were (1) to measure the solubility of uranium species in Boom Clay water, with UO{sub 2} as the solid phase, and (2) to assess the impact of dissolved organic matter and carbonate concentration on this solubility. The tests were supported by calculations with geochemical codes to indicate possibly solubility controlling solid phases. The tests were performed in anoxic and reducing conditions, at 20 and 25 C. The following conclusions could be drawn: (1) Within 2 months in anoxic conditions, the uranium concentrations appear to approachmore » saturation. (2) The near-saturation concentrations are between 2.4 and 7.8x10{sup {minus}7} M. (3) The influence of the carbonate concentration and humic acids on the uranium concentration was apparently small, but the interpretation is hampered by pH and E{sub h} and/or pH conditions; this can probably be explained by small differences in experimental conditions. (5) The measured near steady-state uranium concentration in the real clay water agrees relatively well with the solubility calculated for uraninite. (6) Addition of sulfide species reduced the redox potential, but not the uranium concentrations, except in real Boom Clay water.« less
  • Atmospheric cloud water contains an active microbial community which can impact climate, human health and ecosystem processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Most studies on the composition of microbial communities in clouds have been performed with orographic clouds that are typically in direct contact with the ground. We collected water samples from cumulus clouds above the upper U.S. Midwest. The cloud water was analyzed for the diversity of bacterial phylotypes by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. DGGE analyses of bacterial communities detected 17e21 bands per sample. Sequencing confirmed the presence of a diversemore » bacterial community; sequences from seven bacterial phyla were retrieved. Cloud water bacterial communities appeared to be dominated by members of the cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, actinobacteria and firmicutes.« less
  • SCK{center{underscore}dot}CEN has developed in the early 1980's, with the support of NIRAS/ONDRAF and EC, an extensive in situ corrosion program to evaluate the long-term corrosion behavior of various candidate container materials for the disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. The in situ corrosion experiments were performed in the underground research facility, HADES, situated in the Boom Clay formation at a depth of 225 meters below ground level. These experiments place the samples either in direct contact with clay (type I), in a humid clay atmosphere (type 2), or in a concrete saturated clay atmosphere (type 3). Duringmore » the period 1985--1994, twelve in situ corrosion experiments were installed in the underground laboratory. The exploitation of these experiments ended in 1996. All samples were recuperated and analyzed. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the type 1 corrosion experiments (samples in direct contact with Boom Clay). Surface analyses tend to indicate that the so-called corrosion-resistant materials, e.g. stainless steels, Ni- and Ti-alloys, remain intact after exposure to Boom Clay between 16 and 170 C, whereas carbon steel presents significant pitting corrosion. Carbon steel seems to be unsuitable for the Belgian repository concept (pits up to 240{micro}m deep are detected after direct exposure to the argillaceous environment for 2 years at 90 C). The stainless steels look very promising candidate container materials.« less
  • Among the actinides which can be released from vitrified HLW, Neptunium-237 is considered as the most critical one in the Belgian performance assessment studies. Therefore, leaching experiments with Np-doped glass in humic acid containing Boom Clay water at different conditions were carried out. For the speciation of Np in the leachate, LPAS (Laser Photoacoustic spectroscopy) and UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy were used. The Np concentration in the leachates, after a slightly decrease, seems to approach a steady-state value at about 5 x 10{sup {minus}7} M after 6 months of glass corrosion. The highest Np concentrations were observed for the highest S/Vmore » value and for the glass doped with the highest Np concentration, the combination of the two separate parameters leading to even higher Np concentrations in solution. Np is mainly bound to colloids. The first spectra of the leachates obtained by LPAS confirm the potentiality of this technique to characterize the Np species at low Np concentration and show the presence of Np(IV) complexes which have still to be identified. The authors, can, therefore, anticipate that the Np steady-state concentration may be controlled by a Np(V) reduction/precipitation process.« less