skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Characterisation and evaluation of wastes for treatment in the batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik, Sweden

Abstract

The new batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik is built primarily for treatment of uranium containing dry active waste, 'DAW'. Several other waste types have been identified that are considered or assumed suitable for treatment in the pyrolysis plant because of the possibility to carefully control the atmosphere and temperature of the thermal treatment. These waste types must be characterised and an evaluation must be made with a BAT (Best Available Technology) perspective. Studsvik have performed or plan to perform lab scale pyrolysis tests on a number of different waste types. These include - Pyrophoric materials (uranium shavings) - Uranium chemicals that must be oxidised prior to being deposited in repository - Sludges and oil soaks (this category includes NORM materials) - Ion exchange resins (both 'free' and solidified/stabilised) - Bitumen solidified waste Methodology and assessment criteria for various waste types, together with results obtained for the lab scale tests that have been performed, are described. (authors)

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Waste Technology, Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoping (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Society of Mechanical Engineers - ASME, Nuclear Engineering Division, Environmental Engineering Division, Two Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22535169
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ICEM2013 - ASME 2013: 15. International Conference on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste Management, Brussels (Belgium), 8-12 Sep 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France; 1 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; BEST AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGY; BITUMENS; HEAT TREATMENTS; ION EXCHANGE; PYROLYSIS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SOLIDIFICATION; SWEDEN; URANIUM

Citation Formats

Lindberg, Maria, Osterberg, Carl, and Vernersson, Thomas. Characterisation and evaluation of wastes for treatment in the batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik, Sweden. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1115/ICEM2013-96246.
Lindberg, Maria, Osterberg, Carl, & Vernersson, Thomas. Characterisation and evaluation of wastes for treatment in the batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik, Sweden. United States. doi:10.1115/ICEM2013-96246.
Lindberg, Maria, Osterberg, Carl, and Vernersson, Thomas. Mon . "Characterisation and evaluation of wastes for treatment in the batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik, Sweden". United States. doi:10.1115/ICEM2013-96246.
@article{osti_22535169,
title = {Characterisation and evaluation of wastes for treatment in the batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik, Sweden},
author = {Lindberg, Maria and Osterberg, Carl and Vernersson, Thomas},
abstractNote = {The new batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik is built primarily for treatment of uranium containing dry active waste, 'DAW'. Several other waste types have been identified that are considered or assumed suitable for treatment in the pyrolysis plant because of the possibility to carefully control the atmosphere and temperature of the thermal treatment. These waste types must be characterised and an evaluation must be made with a BAT (Best Available Technology) perspective. Studsvik have performed or plan to perform lab scale pyrolysis tests on a number of different waste types. These include - Pyrophoric materials (uranium shavings) - Uranium chemicals that must be oxidised prior to being deposited in repository - Sludges and oil soaks (this category includes NORM materials) - Ion exchange resins (both 'free' and solidified/stabilised) - Bitumen solidified waste Methodology and assessment criteria for various waste types, together with results obtained for the lab scale tests that have been performed, are described. (authors)},
doi = {10.1115/ICEM2013-96246},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The new batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik is built primarily for treatment of uranium containing dry active waste, 'DAW'. Several other waste types have been identified that are considered or assumed suitable for treatment in the pyrolysis plant because of the possibility to carefully control the atmosphere and temperature of the thermal treatment. These waste types must be characterised and an evaluation must be made with a BAT perspective. Studsvik have performed or plan to perform lab scale pyrolysis tests on a number of different waste types. These include: - Pyrophoric materials (uranium shavings), - Uranium chemicals that must bemore » oxidised prior to being deposited in repository, - Sludges and oil soaks (this category includes NORM-materials), - Ion exchange resins (both 'free' and solidified/stabilised), - Bitumen solidified waste. Methodology and assessment criteria for various waste types, together with results obtained for the lab scale tests that have been performed, are described. (authors)« less
  • After a sequence of lab scale and bench scale trials the building of a pyrolysis plant could begin at the Studsvik site in Sweden. The facility is primarily aimed at treatment of uranium contaminated organic waste originating at fuel manufacturing plants and other facilities where the main contamination is uranium. The plant is an extension/addition to the already operating incinerator. In order to further widen the waste acceptance criteria the design of the off-gas treatment system does not have the same design as that of the incinerator. The building of the facility began in April 2011, and the first heatingmore » of the facility took place in late December, 2011. The site acceptance tests are planned for January, as are the first inactive trials aimed at optimisation of process control. The facility is planned to be operating with radioactive materials from February 2012. The pyrolysis unit is primarily aimed at treatment of uranium contaminated waste, under conditions that facilitate leaching and recovery of the uranium from the ashes. However, a number of other uses are conceivable. The batch fed pyrolysis unit, with its chosen design of the off-gas treatment system, enables treatment of some waste fractions that are difficult to treat in the incinerator. For instance small campaigns, i.e. smaller quantities of waste (typically <5 tonnes), or waste containing high levels of chlorine and sulphur are possible to treat in the pyrolysis unit. The pyrolysis unit is also expected to perform well in the treatment of other 'difficult' waste fractions, for instance waste containing pyrophoric materials, or other types of waste that benefit from the high level of process control, i.e. control of temperature and atmosphere throughout the process, that can be obtained in the pyrolysis unit compared to the incinerator. Furthermore, treatment in the pyrolysis unit minimises the risk of cross contamination between different waste treatment campaigns. This feature is obtained thanks to the low gas flow rates in the vessel, which means that a higher retention of nuclides in the ashes is obtained, but also through a design that facilitates cleaning of the pyrolysis vessel and the system beyond this, or even exchanging the most critical components, such as the pyrolysis vessel itself, if need be. (authors)« less
  • The largest decommissioning project of its kind so far in Sweden has taken seven years. Fourteen thousand square metres have been decommissioned by a small group. In October 2005, a final application was made for free release of the buildings. Demolition of the building is planned for April 2006. The nuclear laboratory plant was contaminated with Co-60, Cs-137, Sr-90, H-3 and transuranic nuclides. The aim of the project was to clean up the laboratory to release levels, and then final demolition. Decommissioning has been under way since 1998.[1] The plant was built between 1959 and 1963 for use as amore » research facility for reprocessing spent fuel, research on plutonium-enriched fuel, material testing and test fabrication of rods with MOX-fuel. The THOR technology with pyrolyses was developed here and is now being used by Studsvik in Erwin, USA. A thorough final evaluation of the project is presented in this paper. (authors)« less