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Title: Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor

Abstract

Methods of low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing comprise: cementation, bituminization, curing in polymer matrices, combustion and pyrolysis. All these methods are limited in their application in the field of chemical, morphological, and aggregate composition of material to be processed. The thermal plasma method is one of the universal methods of RAW processing. The use of electric-arc plasma with mean temperatures 2000 - 8000 K can effectively carry out the destruction of organic compounds into atoms and ions with very high speeds and high degree of conversion. Destruction of complex substances without oxygen leads to a decrease of the volume of exhaust gases and dimension of gas cleaning system. This paper presents the plasma reactor for thermal processing of low and intermediate level radioactive waste of mixed morphology. The equipment realizes plasma-pyrolytic conversion of wastes and results in a conditioned product in a single stage. As a result, the volume of conditioned waste is significantly reduced (more than 10 times). Waste is converted into an environmentally friendly form that suits long-term storage. The leaching rate of macro-components from the vitrified compound is less than 1.10{sup -7} g/(cm{sup 2}.day). (authors)

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. A.V.Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute of theNational Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)
  2. Ghent University, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Society of Mechanical Engineers - ASME, Nuclear Engineering Division, Environmental Engineering Division, Two Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22535150
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ICEM2013 - ASME 2013: 15. International Conference on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste Management, Brussels (Belgium), 8-12 Sep 2013; Other Information: Country of input: France; 8 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; BITUMENS; CEMENTING; INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE OVER 4000 K

Citation Formats

Sauchyn, V., Khvedchyn, I., and Van Oost, G. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Sauchyn, V., Khvedchyn, I., & Van Oost, G. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor. United States.
Sauchyn, V., Khvedchyn, I., and Van Oost, G. Mon . "Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22535150,
title = {Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor},
author = {Sauchyn, V. and Khvedchyn, I. and Van Oost, G.},
abstractNote = {Methods of low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing comprise: cementation, bituminization, curing in polymer matrices, combustion and pyrolysis. All these methods are limited in their application in the field of chemical, morphological, and aggregate composition of material to be processed. The thermal plasma method is one of the universal methods of RAW processing. The use of electric-arc plasma with mean temperatures 2000 - 8000 K can effectively carry out the destruction of organic compounds into atoms and ions with very high speeds and high degree of conversion. Destruction of complex substances without oxygen leads to a decrease of the volume of exhaust gases and dimension of gas cleaning system. This paper presents the plasma reactor for thermal processing of low and intermediate level radioactive waste of mixed morphology. The equipment realizes plasma-pyrolytic conversion of wastes and results in a conditioned product in a single stage. As a result, the volume of conditioned waste is significantly reduced (more than 10 times). Waste is converted into an environmentally friendly form that suits long-term storage. The leaching rate of macro-components from the vitrified compound is less than 1.10{sup -7} g/(cm{sup 2}.day). (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Conference:
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