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Title: Neutron counting with cameras

Abstract

A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn'tmore » allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers - IEEE, 3 Park Avenue, 17th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10016-5997 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22531453
Report Number(s):
ANIMMA-2015-IO-65
TRN: US16V0223102394
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ANIMMA 2015: 4. International Conference on Advancements in Nuclear Instrumentation Measurement Methods and their Applications, Lisboa (Portugal), 20-24 Apr 2015; Other Information: Country of input: France; 4 Refs.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CAMERAS; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COUNTING RATES; DEAD TIME; KEV RANGE; MEV RANGE; NEUTRON DETECTION; NEUTRON DETECTORS; PHOTONS; QUANTUM EFFICIENCY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; THERMAL NEUTRONS; TIME-OF-FLIGHT METHOD; VISIBLE RADIATION; X-RAY DETECTION

Citation Formats

Van Esch, Patrick, Crisanti, Marta, and Mutti, Paolo. Neutron counting with cameras. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Van Esch, Patrick, Crisanti, Marta, & Mutti, Paolo. Neutron counting with cameras. United States.
Van Esch, Patrick, Crisanti, Marta, and Mutti, Paolo. 2015. "Neutron counting with cameras". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_22531453,
title = {Neutron counting with cameras},
author = {Van Esch, Patrick and Crisanti, Marta and Mutti, Paolo},
abstractNote = {A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn't allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2015,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • Progress report presented at the RadSensing 2012 meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
  • The photon counting efficiency of various CCD based cameras was studied as a function of x-ray energy and exposure. A pair of Spectral Instruments Model 800 CCD cameras fitted with 16 {micro}m thick back-illuminated CCDs were calibrated at low x-ray energy using two well established histogram methods, a standard pixel for pixel histogram and the single pixel event histogram method. In addition, two new thick substrate CCDs were evaluated for use at high energy. One was a commercially available Princeton Instruments LCX1300 deep depletion CCD camera while the other was a custom designed 650 {micro}m thick partially depleted CCD fittedmore » to a SI 800 camera body. It is shown that at high x-ray energy, only a pixel-summing algorithm was able to derive spectral data due to the spreading of x-ray events over many pixels in the thicker substrate CCDs. This paper will describe the different algorithms used to extract spectra and the absolute detection efficiencies using these algorithms. These detectors will be very useful to detect high-energy x-ray photons from high-intensity short pulse laser interactions.« less
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  • Abstract not provided.