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Title: DEEP CHANDRA, HST-COS, AND MEGACAM OBSERVATIONS OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER: EXTREME STAR FORMATION AND AGN FEEDBACK ON HUNDRED KILOPARSEC SCALES

Abstract

We present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ∼50–100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}), young (∼4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 ± 50 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. We report a strong detection of O vi λλ1032,1038, which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) from the cooling intracluster medium (ICM). We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ∼10 kpc, which are among the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2–7 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup −1}. We provide evidence that the active galactic nucleus inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from “quasar-mode” to “radio-mode,” and may currently be insufficient to completely offset cooling. A model-subtracted residual X-ray image reveals evidence for prior episodes of strong radio-mode feedback at radii of ∼100 kpc, with extended “ghost” cavities indicating a prior epoch of feedback roughlymore » 100 Myr ago. This residual image also exhibits significant asymmetry in the inner ∼200 kpc (0.15R{sub 500}), reminiscent of infalling cool clouds, either due to minor mergers or fragmentation of the cooling ICM. Taken together, these data reveal a rapidly evolving cool core which is rich with structure (both spatially and in temperature), is subject to a variety of highly energetic processes, and yet is cooling rapidly and forming stars along thin, narrow filaments.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [4];  [5]; ;  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14]
  1. Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)
  3. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  4. Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)
  5. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States)
  6. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)
  7. Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)
  8. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)
  9. Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)
  10. Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)
  11. Huntingdon Institute for X-ray Astronomy, LLC Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)
  12. Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6 128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)
  13. Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)
  14. Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22525350
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 811; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CLOUDS; COOLING; DETECTION; FEEDBACK; FILAMENTS; GALAXY CLUSTERS; GALAXY NUCLEI; IMAGES; JETS; QUASARS; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA; X RADIATION; X-RAY GALAXIES

Citation Formats

McDonald, Michael, Bautz, Marshall W., Miller, Eric D., ZuHone, John A., McNamara, Brian R., Weeren, Reinout J. van, Bayliss, Matthew, Jones-Forman, Christine, Applegate, Douglas E., Benson, Bradford A., Carlstrom, John E., Mantz, Adam B., Bleem, Lindsey E., Chatzikos, Marios, Edge, Alastair C., Fabian, Andrew C., Garmire, Gordon P., Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie, Stalder, Brian, and Veilleux, Sylvain, E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu. DEEP CHANDRA, HST-COS, AND MEGACAM OBSERVATIONS OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER: EXTREME STAR FORMATION AND AGN FEEDBACK ON HUNDRED KILOPARSEC SCALES. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/811/2/111.
McDonald, Michael, Bautz, Marshall W., Miller, Eric D., ZuHone, John A., McNamara, Brian R., Weeren, Reinout J. van, Bayliss, Matthew, Jones-Forman, Christine, Applegate, Douglas E., Benson, Bradford A., Carlstrom, John E., Mantz, Adam B., Bleem, Lindsey E., Chatzikos, Marios, Edge, Alastair C., Fabian, Andrew C., Garmire, Gordon P., Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie, Stalder, Brian, & Veilleux, Sylvain, E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu. DEEP CHANDRA, HST-COS, AND MEGACAM OBSERVATIONS OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER: EXTREME STAR FORMATION AND AGN FEEDBACK ON HUNDRED KILOPARSEC SCALES. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/811/2/111.
McDonald, Michael, Bautz, Marshall W., Miller, Eric D., ZuHone, John A., McNamara, Brian R., Weeren, Reinout J. van, Bayliss, Matthew, Jones-Forman, Christine, Applegate, Douglas E., Benson, Bradford A., Carlstrom, John E., Mantz, Adam B., Bleem, Lindsey E., Chatzikos, Marios, Edge, Alastair C., Fabian, Andrew C., Garmire, Gordon P., Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie, Stalder, Brian, and Veilleux, Sylvain, E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu. Thu . "DEEP CHANDRA, HST-COS, AND MEGACAM OBSERVATIONS OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER: EXTREME STAR FORMATION AND AGN FEEDBACK ON HUNDRED KILOPARSEC SCALES". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/811/2/111.
@article{osti_22525350,
title = {DEEP CHANDRA, HST-COS, AND MEGACAM OBSERVATIONS OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER: EXTREME STAR FORMATION AND AGN FEEDBACK ON HUNDRED KILOPARSEC SCALES},
author = {McDonald, Michael and Bautz, Marshall W. and Miller, Eric D. and ZuHone, John A. and McNamara, Brian R. and Weeren, Reinout J. van and Bayliss, Matthew and Jones-Forman, Christine and Applegate, Douglas E. and Benson, Bradford A. and Carlstrom, John E. and Mantz, Adam B. and Bleem, Lindsey E. and Chatzikos, Marios and Edge, Alastair C. and Fabian, Andrew C. and Garmire, Gordon P. and Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie and Stalder, Brian and Veilleux, Sylvain, E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu},
abstractNote = {We present new ultraviolet, optical, and X-ray data on the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). Deep optical imaging reveals previously undetected filaments of star formation, extending to radii of ∼50–100 kpc in multiple directions. Combined UV-optical spectroscopy of the central galaxy reveals a massive (2 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}), young (∼4.5 Myr) population of stars, consistent with a time-averaged star formation rate of 610 ± 50 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. We report a strong detection of O vi λλ1032,1038, which appears to originate primarily in shock-heated gas, but may contain a substantial contribution (>1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) from the cooling intracluster medium (ICM). We confirm the presence of deep X-ray cavities in the inner ∼10 kpc, which are among the most extreme examples of radio-mode feedback detected to date, implying jet powers of 2–7 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup −1}. We provide evidence that the active galactic nucleus inflating these cavities may have only recently transitioned from “quasar-mode” to “radio-mode,” and may currently be insufficient to completely offset cooling. A model-subtracted residual X-ray image reveals evidence for prior episodes of strong radio-mode feedback at radii of ∼100 kpc, with extended “ghost” cavities indicating a prior epoch of feedback roughly 100 Myr ago. This residual image also exhibits significant asymmetry in the inner ∼200 kpc (0.15R{sub 500}), reminiscent of infalling cool clouds, either due to minor mergers or fragmentation of the cooling ICM. Taken together, these data reveal a rapidly evolving cool core which is rich with structure (both spatially and in temperature), is subject to a variety of highly energetic processes, and yet is cooling rapidly and forming stars along thin, narrow filaments.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/811/2/111},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 811,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}