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Title: Hα AND EUV OBSERVATIONS OF A PARTIAL CME

Abstract

We have obtained Hα high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer. The Hα observations were conducted on 2012 February 11 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera instrument at the National Solar Observatory’s Dunn Solar Telescope. Our Hα observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations (“blobs”) returning to the solar surface at velocities of ≈200 km s{sup −1} in both Hα and several SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly band passes. The average derived size of these “blobs” in Hα is 500 by 3000 km{sup 2} in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our “blob” widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate that there are additional, smaller, unresolved “blobs” in agreement with previous studies and recent numerical simulations. Our observed velocities and decelerations of the “blobs” in both Hα and SDO bands are less than those expected for gravitational free-fall and imply additional magnetic or gas pressure impeding the flow. We derived a kinetic energy of ≈2more » orders of magnitude lower for the main eruption than a typical coronal mass ejection, which may explain its partial nature.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)
  2. Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)
  3. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22522433
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 804; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; CAMERAS; CHROMOSPHERE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; FILAMENTS; HYDROGEN; KINETIC ENERGY; MASS; SOLAR CORONA; SOLAR PROMINENCES; SUN; SURFACES; TELESCOPES; TIME RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Christian, Damian J., Jess, David B., Mathioudakis, Mihalis, and Antolin, Patrick, E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu. Hα AND EUV OBSERVATIONS OF A PARTIAL CME. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/147.
Christian, Damian J., Jess, David B., Mathioudakis, Mihalis, & Antolin, Patrick, E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu. Hα AND EUV OBSERVATIONS OF A PARTIAL CME. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/147.
Christian, Damian J., Jess, David B., Mathioudakis, Mihalis, and Antolin, Patrick, E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu. Sun . "Hα AND EUV OBSERVATIONS OF A PARTIAL CME". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/147.
@article{osti_22522433,
title = {Hα AND EUV OBSERVATIONS OF A PARTIAL CME},
author = {Christian, Damian J. and Jess, David B. and Mathioudakis, Mihalis and Antolin, Patrick, E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu},
abstractNote = {We have obtained Hα high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer. The Hα observations were conducted on 2012 February 11 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera instrument at the National Solar Observatory’s Dunn Solar Telescope. Our Hα observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations (“blobs”) returning to the solar surface at velocities of ≈200 km s{sup −1} in both Hα and several SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly band passes. The average derived size of these “blobs” in Hα is 500 by 3000 km{sup 2} in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our “blob” widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate that there are additional, smaller, unresolved “blobs” in agreement with previous studies and recent numerical simulations. Our observed velocities and decelerations of the “blobs” in both Hα and SDO bands are less than those expected for gravitational free-fall and imply additional magnetic or gas pressure impeding the flow. We derived a kinetic energy of ≈2 orders of magnitude lower for the main eruption than a typical coronal mass ejection, which may explain its partial nature.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/147},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 804,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}