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Title: HIGH-RESOLUTION 25 μM IMAGING OF THE DISKS AROUND HERBIG AE/BE STARS

Abstract

We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 μm using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of an equal number of objects from each of the two categories defined by Meeus et al.; 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (flat disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is difficult to resolve with 8 m class telescopes in the Q band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. This indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 μm, we suggest that many, but not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 μm supports the idea that group II disks have a continuous flat disk geometry. It has been inferred that group I disks may evolve into group II through the settling ofmore » dust grains into the mid-plane of the protoplanetary disk. However, considering the growing evidence for the presence of a hole or gap in the disk of group I sources, such an evolutionary scenario is unlikely. The difference between groups I and II may reflect different evolutionary pathways of protoplanetary disks.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ; ;  [6]; ;  [7]; ;  [8];  [9]; ;  [10]
  1. Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan)
  2. Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)
  3. Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan)
  4. Department of Infrared Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)
  5. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)
  6. Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)
  7. Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States)
  8. Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)
  9. Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
  10. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22522432
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 804; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; FLARING; HERBIG-HARO OBJECTS; IMAGES; PROTOPLANETS; RESOLUTION; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Honda, M., Maaskant, K., Okamoto, Y. K., Kataza, H., Yamashita, T., Miyata, T., Sako, S., Kamizuka, T., Fujiyoshi, T., Fujiwara, H., Sakon, I., Onaka, T., Mulders, G. D., Lopez-Rodriguez, E., and Packham, C. HIGH-RESOLUTION 25 μM IMAGING OF THE DISKS AROUND HERBIG AE/BE STARS. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/143.
Honda, M., Maaskant, K., Okamoto, Y. K., Kataza, H., Yamashita, T., Miyata, T., Sako, S., Kamizuka, T., Fujiyoshi, T., Fujiwara, H., Sakon, I., Onaka, T., Mulders, G. D., Lopez-Rodriguez, E., & Packham, C. HIGH-RESOLUTION 25 μM IMAGING OF THE DISKS AROUND HERBIG AE/BE STARS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/143.
Honda, M., Maaskant, K., Okamoto, Y. K., Kataza, H., Yamashita, T., Miyata, T., Sako, S., Kamizuka, T., Fujiyoshi, T., Fujiwara, H., Sakon, I., Onaka, T., Mulders, G. D., Lopez-Rodriguez, E., and Packham, C. Sun . "HIGH-RESOLUTION 25 μM IMAGING OF THE DISKS AROUND HERBIG AE/BE STARS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/143.
@article{osti_22522432,
title = {HIGH-RESOLUTION 25 μM IMAGING OF THE DISKS AROUND HERBIG AE/BE STARS},
author = {Honda, M. and Maaskant, K. and Okamoto, Y. K. and Kataza, H. and Yamashita, T. and Miyata, T. and Sako, S. and Kamizuka, T. and Fujiyoshi, T. and Fujiwara, H. and Sakon, I. and Onaka, T. and Mulders, G. D. and Lopez-Rodriguez, E. and Packham, C.},
abstractNote = {We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 μm using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of an equal number of objects from each of the two categories defined by Meeus et al.; 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (flat disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is difficult to resolve with 8 m class telescopes in the Q band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. This indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 μm, we suggest that many, but not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 μm supports the idea that group II disks have a continuous flat disk geometry. It has been inferred that group I disks may evolve into group II through the settling of dust grains into the mid-plane of the protoplanetary disk. However, considering the growing evidence for the presence of a hole or gap in the disk of group I sources, such an evolutionary scenario is unlikely. The difference between groups I and II may reflect different evolutionary pathways of protoplanetary disks.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/804/2/143},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 804,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}