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Title: REVEALING THE NATURE OF EXTREME CORONAL-LINE EMITTER SDSS J095209.56+214313.3

Abstract

Extreme coronal-line emitter (ECLE) SDSS J095209.56+214313.3, known by its strong, fading, high-ionization lines, has been a long-standing candidate for a tidal disruption event; however, a supernova (SN) origin has not yet been ruled out. Here we add several new pieces of information to the puzzle of the nature of the transient that powered its variable coronal lines: (1) an optical light curve from the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) survey that serendipitously catches the optical flare, and (2) late-time observations of the host galaxy with the Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-ray telescope (XRT) and the ground-based Mercator telescope. The well-sampled, ∼10 yr long, unfiltered LINEAR light curve constrains the onset of the flare to a precision of ±5 days and enables us to place a lower limit on the peak optical magnitude. Difference imaging allows us to estimate the location of the flare in proximity of the host galaxy core. Comparison of the GALEX data (early 2006) with the recently acquired Swift UVOT (2015 June) and Mercator observations (2015 April) demonstrates a decrease in the UV flux over a ∼10 yr period, confirming that the flare was UV-bright. The long-lived UV-bright emission, detected 1.8 rest-frame years after the start ofmore » the flare, strongly disfavors an SN origin. These new data allow us to conclude that the flare was indeed powered by the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole and that tidal disruption events are in fact capable of powering the enigmatic class of ECLEs.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Observatoire astronomique de l’Université de Genève, 51 chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)
  2. Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)
  3. Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)
  4. Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States)
  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 30 Bikini Atoll Road, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States)
  6. University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22521439
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 819; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; ASTEROIDS; BLACK HOLES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DIAGRAMS; GALAXIES; GALAXY NUCLEI; STELLAR CORONAE; STELLAR FLARES; SUPERNOVAE; TELESCOPES; TRANSIENTS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Palaversa, Lovro, Holl, Berry, Gezari, Suvi, Sesar, Branimir, Stuart, J. Scott, Wozniak, Przemyslaw, and Ivezić, Željko. REVEALING THE NATURE OF EXTREME CORONAL-LINE EMITTER SDSS J095209.56+214313.3. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/819/2/151.
Palaversa, Lovro, Holl, Berry, Gezari, Suvi, Sesar, Branimir, Stuart, J. Scott, Wozniak, Przemyslaw, & Ivezić, Željko. REVEALING THE NATURE OF EXTREME CORONAL-LINE EMITTER SDSS J095209.56+214313.3. United States. https://doi.org/10.3847/0004-637X/819/2/151
Palaversa, Lovro, Holl, Berry, Gezari, Suvi, Sesar, Branimir, Stuart, J. Scott, Wozniak, Przemyslaw, and Ivezić, Željko. Thu . "REVEALING THE NATURE OF EXTREME CORONAL-LINE EMITTER SDSS J095209.56+214313.3". United States. https://doi.org/10.3847/0004-637X/819/2/151.
@article{osti_22521439,
title = {REVEALING THE NATURE OF EXTREME CORONAL-LINE EMITTER SDSS J095209.56+214313.3},
author = {Palaversa, Lovro and Holl, Berry and Gezari, Suvi and Sesar, Branimir and Stuart, J. Scott and Wozniak, Przemyslaw and Ivezić, Željko},
abstractNote = {Extreme coronal-line emitter (ECLE) SDSS J095209.56+214313.3, known by its strong, fading, high-ionization lines, has been a long-standing candidate for a tidal disruption event; however, a supernova (SN) origin has not yet been ruled out. Here we add several new pieces of information to the puzzle of the nature of the transient that powered its variable coronal lines: (1) an optical light curve from the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) survey that serendipitously catches the optical flare, and (2) late-time observations of the host galaxy with the Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-ray telescope (XRT) and the ground-based Mercator telescope. The well-sampled, ∼10 yr long, unfiltered LINEAR light curve constrains the onset of the flare to a precision of ±5 days and enables us to place a lower limit on the peak optical magnitude. Difference imaging allows us to estimate the location of the flare in proximity of the host galaxy core. Comparison of the GALEX data (early 2006) with the recently acquired Swift UVOT (2015 June) and Mercator observations (2015 April) demonstrates a decrease in the UV flux over a ∼10 yr period, confirming that the flare was UV-bright. The long-lived UV-bright emission, detected 1.8 rest-frame years after the start of the flare, strongly disfavors an SN origin. These new data allow us to conclude that the flare was indeed powered by the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole and that tidal disruption events are in fact capable of powering the enigmatic class of ECLEs.},
doi = {10.3847/0004-637X/819/2/151},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22521439}, journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 819,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

Dawes Review 6: The Impact of Companions on Stellar Evolution
journal, January 2017


New Physical Insights about Tidal Disruption Events from a Comprehensive Observational Inventory at X-Ray Wavelengths
journal, April 2017


A New Class of Changing-look LINERs
journal, September 2019