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Title: MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS IN THE K2 ENGINEERING FIELD OF VIEW

Abstract

Unlike NASA’s original Kepler Discovery Mission, the renewed K2 Mission will target the plane of the Ecliptic, observing each field for approximately 75 days. This will bring new opportunities and challenges, in particular the presence of a large number of main-belt asteroids that will contaminate the photometry. The large pixel size makes K2 data susceptible to the effects of apparent minor planet encounters. Here, we investigate the effects of asteroid encounters on photometric precision using a subsample of the K2 engineering data taken in 2014 February. We show examples of asteroid contamination to facilitate their recognition and distinguish these events from other error sources. We conclude that main-belt asteroids will have considerable effects on K2 photometry of a large number of photometric targets during the Mission that will have to be taken into account. These results will be readily applicable for future space photometric missions applying large-format CCDs, such as TESS and PLATO.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15-17 (Hungary)
  2. Gothard-Lendület Research Team, H-9704 Szombathely, Szent Imre herceg út 112 (Hungary)
  3. Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, H-1117 Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, Budapest (Hungary)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22520196
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 149; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCURACY; ASTEROIDS; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; PHOTOMETRY; PLANETS; SPACE

Citation Formats

Szabó, R., Sárneczky, K., Szabó, Gy. M., Pál, A., Kiss, Cs. P., Kiss, L. L., Csák, B., Illés, L., and Rácz, G., E-mail: rszabo@konkoly.hu. MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS IN THE K2 ENGINEERING FIELD OF VIEW. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/149/3/112.
Szabó, R., Sárneczky, K., Szabó, Gy. M., Pál, A., Kiss, Cs. P., Kiss, L. L., Csák, B., Illés, L., & Rácz, G., E-mail: rszabo@konkoly.hu. MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS IN THE K2 ENGINEERING FIELD OF VIEW. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/149/3/112.
Szabó, R., Sárneczky, K., Szabó, Gy. M., Pál, A., Kiss, Cs. P., Kiss, L. L., Csák, B., Illés, L., and Rácz, G., E-mail: rszabo@konkoly.hu. Sun . "MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS IN THE K2 ENGINEERING FIELD OF VIEW". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/149/3/112.
@article{osti_22520196,
title = {MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS IN THE K2 ENGINEERING FIELD OF VIEW},
author = {Szabó, R. and Sárneczky, K. and Szabó, Gy. M. and Pál, A. and Kiss, Cs. P. and Kiss, L. L. and Csák, B. and Illés, L. and Rácz, G., E-mail: rszabo@konkoly.hu},
abstractNote = {Unlike NASA’s original Kepler Discovery Mission, the renewed K2 Mission will target the plane of the Ecliptic, observing each field for approximately 75 days. This will bring new opportunities and challenges, in particular the presence of a large number of main-belt asteroids that will contaminate the photometry. The large pixel size makes K2 data susceptible to the effects of apparent minor planet encounters. Here, we investigate the effects of asteroid encounters on photometric precision using a subsample of the K2 engineering data taken in 2014 February. We show examples of asteroid contamination to facilitate their recognition and distinguish these events from other error sources. We conclude that main-belt asteroids will have considerable effects on K2 photometry of a large number of photometric targets during the Mission that will have to be taken into account. These results will be readily applicable for future space photometric missions applying large-format CCDs, such as TESS and PLATO.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-6256/149/3/112},
journal = {Astronomical Journal (Online)},
number = 3,
volume = 149,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
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