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Title: SU-E-J-264: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Features to Quantify Radiotherapy-Induced Normal Tissue Morbidity

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-derived features as indicators of Radiotherapy (RT)-induced normal tissue morbidity. We also investigate the relationship between these features and RT dose in four critical structures. Methods: We demonstrate our approach for four patients treated with RT for base of tongue cancer in 2005–2007. For each patient, two MRI scans (T1-weighted pre (T1pre) and post (T1post) gadolinium contrast-enhancement) were acquired within the first six months after RT. The assessed morbidity endpoint observed in 2/4 patients was Grade 2+ CTCAEv.3 trismus. Four ipsilateral masticatory-related structures (masseter, lateral and medial pterygoid, and the temporal muscles) were delineated on both T1pre and T1post and these scans were co-registered to the treatment planning CT using a deformable demons algorithm. For each structure, the maximum and mean RT dose, and six MRI-derived features (the second order texture features entropy and homogeneity, and the first order mean, median, kurtosis, and skewness) were extracted and compared structure-wise between patients with and without trismus. All MRI-derived features were calculated as the difference between T1pre and T1post, ΔS. Results: For 5/6 features and all structures, ΔS diverged between trismus and non-trismus patients particularly for themore » masseter, lateral pterygoid, and temporal muscles using the kurtosis feature (−0.2 vs. 6.4 for lateral pterygoid). Both the maximum and mean RT dose in all four muscles were higher amongst the trismus patients (with the maximum dose being up to 25 Gy higher). Conclusion: Using MRI-derived features to quantify RT-induced normal tissue complications is feasible. We showed that several features are different between patients with and without morbidity and that the RT dose in all investigated structures are higher amongst patients with morbidity. MRI-derived features, therefore, has the potential to improve predictions of normal tissue morbidity.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22499362
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; ANIMAL TISSUES; ASYMMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DISEASE INCIDENCE; MUSCLES; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Thor, M, Tyagi, N, and Deasy, J. SU-E-J-264: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Features to Quantify Radiotherapy-Induced Normal Tissue Morbidity. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924350.
Thor, M, Tyagi, N, & Deasy, J. SU-E-J-264: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Features to Quantify Radiotherapy-Induced Normal Tissue Morbidity. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924350.
Thor, M, Tyagi, N, and Deasy, J. Mon . "SU-E-J-264: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Features to Quantify Radiotherapy-Induced Normal Tissue Morbidity". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924350.
@article{osti_22499362,
title = {SU-E-J-264: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Features to Quantify Radiotherapy-Induced Normal Tissue Morbidity},
author = {Thor, M and Tyagi, N and Deasy, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-derived features as indicators of Radiotherapy (RT)-induced normal tissue morbidity. We also investigate the relationship between these features and RT dose in four critical structures. Methods: We demonstrate our approach for four patients treated with RT for base of tongue cancer in 2005–2007. For each patient, two MRI scans (T1-weighted pre (T1pre) and post (T1post) gadolinium contrast-enhancement) were acquired within the first six months after RT. The assessed morbidity endpoint observed in 2/4 patients was Grade 2+ CTCAEv.3 trismus. Four ipsilateral masticatory-related structures (masseter, lateral and medial pterygoid, and the temporal muscles) were delineated on both T1pre and T1post and these scans were co-registered to the treatment planning CT using a deformable demons algorithm. For each structure, the maximum and mean RT dose, and six MRI-derived features (the second order texture features entropy and homogeneity, and the first order mean, median, kurtosis, and skewness) were extracted and compared structure-wise between patients with and without trismus. All MRI-derived features were calculated as the difference between T1pre and T1post, ΔS. Results: For 5/6 features and all structures, ΔS diverged between trismus and non-trismus patients particularly for the masseter, lateral pterygoid, and temporal muscles using the kurtosis feature (−0.2 vs. 6.4 for lateral pterygoid). Both the maximum and mean RT dose in all four muscles were higher amongst the trismus patients (with the maximum dose being up to 25 Gy higher). Conclusion: Using MRI-derived features to quantify RT-induced normal tissue complications is feasible. We showed that several features are different between patients with and without morbidity and that the RT dose in all investigated structures are higher amongst patients with morbidity. MRI-derived features, therefore, has the potential to improve predictions of normal tissue morbidity.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924350},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated withmore » PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.« less
  • Purpose Isocenter shifts and rotations to correct patient setup errors and organ motion cannot remedy some shape changes of large targets. We are investigating new methods in quantification of target deformation for realtime IGRT of breast and chest wall cancer. Methods Ninety-five patients of breast or chest wall cancer were accrued in an IRB-approved clinical trial of IGRT using 3D surface images acquired at daily setup and beam-on time via an in-room camera. Shifts and rotations relating to the planned reference surface were determined using iterative-closest-point alignment. Local surface displacements and target deformation are measured via a ray-surface intersection andmore » principal component analysis (PCA) of external surface, respectively. Isocenter shift, upper-abdominal displacement, and vectors of the surface projected onto the two principal components, PC1 and PC2, were evaluated for sensitivity and accuracy in detection of target deformation. Setup errors for some deformed targets were estimated by superlatively registering target volume, inner surface, or external surface in weekly CBCT or these outlines on weekly EPI. Results Setup difference according to the inner-surface, external surface, or target volume could be 1.5 cm. Video surface-guided setup agreed with EPI results to within < 0.5 cm while CBCT results were sometimes (∼20%) different from that of EPI (>0.5 cm) due to target deformation for some large breasts and some chest walls undergoing deep-breath-hold irradiation. Square root of PC1 and PC2 is very sensitive to external surface deformation and irregular breathing. Conclusion PCA of external surfaces is quick and simple way to detect target deformation in IGRT of breast and chest wall cancer. Setup corrections based on the target volume, inner surface, and external surface could be significant different. Thus, checking of target shape changes is essential for accurate image-guided patient setup and motion tracking of large deformable targets. NIH grant for the first author as cionsultant and the last author as the PI.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a computerized pharmacokinetic model-free Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) segmentation method based on dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data that can improve physician GTV contouring efficiency. Methods: 12 patients with biopsy-proven early stage breast cancer with post-contrast enhanced DCE-MRI images were analyzed in this study. A fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering-based method was applied to segment 3D GTV from pre-operative DCE-MRI data. A region of interest (ROI) is selected by a clinician/physicist, and the normalized signal evolution curves were calculated by dividing the signal intensity enhancement value at each voxel by the pre-contrast signal intensity value at the corresponding voxel.more » Three semi-quantitative metrics were analyzed based on normalized signal evolution curves: initial Area Under signal evolution Curve (iAUC), Immediate Enhancement Ratio (IER), and Variance of Enhancement Slope (VES). The FCM algorithm wass applied to partition ROI voxels into GTV voxels and non-GTV voxels by using three analyzed metrics. The partition map for the smaller cluster is then generated and binarized with an automatically calculated threshold. To reduce spurious structures resulting from background, a labeling operation was performed to keep the largest three-dimensional connected component as the identified target. Basic morphological operations including hole-filling and spur removal were useutilized to improve the target smoothness. Each segmented GTV was compared to that drawn by experienced radiation oncologists. An agreement index was proposed to quantify the overlap between the GTVs identified using two approaches and a thershold value of 0.4 is regarded as acceptable. Results: The GTVs identified by the proposed method were overlapped with the ones drawn by radiation oncologists in all cases, and in 10 out of 12 cases, the agreement indices were above the threshold of 0.4. Conclusion: The proposed automatic segmentation method was shown to be promising and might be used to improve physician contouring efficiency. J Horton receives grant from NIH and Varian Medical Systems; F-F Yin receives grant from Varian Medical Systems.« less
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