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Title: SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion

Abstract

Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The threemore » combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus suggesting the need of AV biofeedback in respiratory-gated treatments.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [6]
  1. Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia)
  2. School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)
  3. (Australia)
  4. Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)
  5. Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)
  6. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22499337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ABDOMEN; ACCURACY; AMPLITUDES; CHEST; DATASETS; DIAPHRAGM; IMAGES; LIVER; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Lee, D, Pollock, S, Keall, P, Greer, P, Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Ludbrook, J, Paganelli, C, Kim, T, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, NC. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924321.
Lee, D, Pollock, S, Keall, P, Greer, P, Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Ludbrook, J, Paganelli, C, Kim, T, & Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, NC. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924321.
Lee, D, Pollock, S, Keall, P, Greer, P, Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Ludbrook, J, Paganelli, C, Kim, T, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, NC. Mon . "SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924321.
@article{osti_22499337,
title = {SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion},
author = {Lee, D and Pollock, S and Keall, P and Greer, P and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW and Ludbrook, J and Paganelli, C and Kim, T and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, NC},
abstractNote = {Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The three combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus suggesting the need of AV biofeedback in respiratory-gated treatments.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924321},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained beforemore » (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.« less
  • Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) andmore » the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath-hold procedures.« less
  • Purpose: In abdominal radiotherapy inconsistent interfraction respiratory motion can result in deviations during treatment from what was planned in terms of target position and motion. Audiovisual biofeedback (AVB) is an interactive respiratory guide that produces a guiding interface that the patient follows over a course of radiotherapy to facilitate regular respiratory motion. This study assessed the impact of AVB on interfraction motion consistency over a course of liver cancer SBRT. Methods: Five liver cancer patients have been recruited into this study, 3 followed AVB over their course of SBRT and 2 were free breathing (FB). Respiratory signals from the Varianmore » RPM were obtained during 4DCT and each treatment fraction. Respiratory signals were organized into 10 respiratory bins, and interfraction consistency was quantified by the difference between each treatment fraction respiratory bin and each respiratory bin from 4DCT. Interfraction consistency was considered as both the relative difference (as a percentage) and absolute difference (in centimeters) between treatment respiratory bins and 4DCT respiratory bins. Results: The relative difference between 4DCT and treatment respiratory bins was 22 ± 16% for FB, and 15 ± 10% for AVB, an improvement of 32% (p < 0.001) with AVB. The absolute difference between 4DCT and treatment respiratory bins was 0.15 ± 0.10 cm for FB, and 0.14 ± 0.13 cm for AVB, an improvement of 4% (p = 0.6) with AVB. Conclusion: This was the first study to compare the impact of AVB breathing guidance on interfraction motion consistency over a course of radiotherapy. AVB demonstrated to significantly reduce the relative difference between 4DCT and treatment respiratory motion, but the absolute differences were comparable, largely due to one AVB patient exhibiting a larger amplitude than the other patients. This study demonstrates the potential benefit of AVB in reducing motion variations during treatment from what was planned. Paul Keall, Sean Pollock, Ricky OBrien and Kuldeep Makhija are shareholders of Respiratory Innovations, an Australian company that is developing a device to improve breathing stability. No funding or support was provided by Respiratory Innovations. Paul Keall is one of the inventors of US patent # 7955270.« less
  • Purpose: Irregular breathing motion has a deleterious impact on 4DCT image quality. The breathing guidance system: audiovisual biofeedback (AVB) is designed to improve breathing regularity, however, its impact on 4DCT image quality has yet to be quantified. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of AVB on thoracic 4DCT image quality by utilizing the digital eXtended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) phantom driven by lung tumor motion patterns. Methods: 2D tumor motion obtained from 4 lung cancer patients under two breathing conditions (i) without breathing guidance (free breathing), and (ii) with guidance (AVB). There were two breathing sessions, yieldingmore » 8 tumor motion traces. This tumor motion was synchronized with the XCAT phantom to simulate 4DCT acquisitions under two acquisition modes: (1) cine mode, and (2) prospective respiratory-gated mode. Motion regularity was quantified by the root mean square error (RMSE) of displacement. The number of artefacts was visually assessed for each 4DCT and summed up for each breathing condition. Inter-session anatomic reproducibility was quantified by the mean absolute difference (MAD) between the Session 1 4DCT and Session 2 4DCT. Results: AVB improved tumor motion regularity by 30%. In cine mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 61 in free breathing to 40 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 34%. In gated mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 63 in free breathing to 51 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 23%. Conclusion: This was the first study to compare the impact of breathing guidance on 4DCT image quality compared to free breathing, with AVB reducing the amount of artefacts present in 4DCT images in addition to improving inter-session anatomic reproducibility. Results thus far suggest that breathing guidance interventions could have implications for improving radiotherapy treatment planning and interfraction reproducibility.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the impact of an audiovisual (AV) biofeedback on intra- and interfraction tumor motion for lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Lung tumor motion was investigated in 9 lung cancer patients who underwent a breathing training session with AV biofeedback before 2 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions. The breathing training session was performed to allow patients to become familiar with AV biofeedback, which uses a guiding wave customized for each patient according to a reference breathing pattern. In the first MRI session (pretreatment), 2-dimensional cine-MR images with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback were obtained, andmore » the second MRI session was repeated within 3-6 weeks (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were directly measured from cine-MR images using an auto-segmentation technique; the centroid and outlier motions of the lung tumors were measured from the segmented tumors. Free breathing and AV biofeedback were compared using several metrics: intra- and interfraction tumor motion consistency in displacement and period, and the outlier motion ratio. Results: Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved intrafraction tumor motion consistency by 34% in displacement (P=.019) and by 73% in period (P<.001). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback improved interfraction tumor motion consistency by 42% in displacement (P<.046) and by 74% in period (P=.005). Compared with FB, AV biofeedback reduced the outlier motion ratio by 21% (P<.001). Conclusions: These results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved intra- and interfraction lung tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results demonstrate that AV biofeedback can facilitate consistent tumor motion, which is advantageous toward achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.« less