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Title: SU-E-J-226: Efficient Use of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Cervical-Cancer Brachytherapy

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate image modality selection in an environment with limited access to interventional MRI for image-guided high-dose-rate cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods: Records of all cervical-cancer patients treated with brachytherapy between 1/2013 and 8/2014 were analyzed. Insertions were performed under CT guidance (CT group) or with >1 fraction under 3T MR guidance (MRI group; subMRI includes only patients who also had a CT-guided insertion). Differences between groups in clinical target volume (CTV), disease stage (I/II or III/IV), number of patients with or without interstitial needles, and CTV D90 were investigated. Statistical significance was evaluated with the Student T test and Fisher test (p <0.05). Results: 46 cervical-cancer patients were included (16 MRI [3 subMRI], 30 CT). CTV: overall, 55±53 cm3; MRI, 81±61 cm3; CT, 42±44 cm3 (p = 0.017). Stage: overall, 24 I/II and 22 III/IV; MRI, 3 I/II and 13 III/IV; CT, 21 I/II and 9 III/IV (p = 0.002). Use of needles: overall, 26 without and 20 with; MRI, 5 without and 11 with; CT, 21 without and 9 with (p = 0.015). CTV D90: overall, 82±5 Gy; MRI, 81±6 Gy; CT, 82±5 Gy (p = 0.78). SubMRI: CTV and D90 (as % of nominal fraction dose) were 23±6more » cm3 and 124±3% for MRI-guided insertions and 21±5 cm3 (p = 0.83) and 106±12% (p = 0.15) for CT-guided insertions. Conclusion: Statistically significant differences in patient population indicate preferential use of MRI for patients with high-stage disease and large residual CTVs requiring the use of interstitial needles. CTV D90 was similar between groups, despite the difference in patient selection. For patients who underwent both CT and MRI insertions, a larger MR CTV D90 and similar CTVs between insertions were observed. While MRI is generally preferable to CT, MRI selection can be optimized in environments without a dedicated MRI brachytherapy suite. This work was partially funded by the NIH R21 CA167800 (PI: Viswanathan; aviswanathan@partners.org)« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22499329
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSE RATES; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Damato, A, Bhagwat, M, Buzurovic, I, Cormack, R, Lee, L, and Viswanathan, A. SU-E-J-226: Efficient Use of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Cervical-Cancer Brachytherapy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924312.
Damato, A, Bhagwat, M, Buzurovic, I, Cormack, R, Lee, L, & Viswanathan, A. SU-E-J-226: Efficient Use of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Cervical-Cancer Brachytherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924312.
Damato, A, Bhagwat, M, Buzurovic, I, Cormack, R, Lee, L, and Viswanathan, A. Mon . "SU-E-J-226: Efficient Use of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Cervical-Cancer Brachytherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924312.
@article{osti_22499329,
title = {SU-E-J-226: Efficient Use of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Cervical-Cancer Brachytherapy},
author = {Damato, A and Bhagwat, M and Buzurovic, I and Cormack, R and Lee, L and Viswanathan, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate image modality selection in an environment with limited access to interventional MRI for image-guided high-dose-rate cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods: Records of all cervical-cancer patients treated with brachytherapy between 1/2013 and 8/2014 were analyzed. Insertions were performed under CT guidance (CT group) or with >1 fraction under 3T MR guidance (MRI group; subMRI includes only patients who also had a CT-guided insertion). Differences between groups in clinical target volume (CTV), disease stage (I/II or III/IV), number of patients with or without interstitial needles, and CTV D90 were investigated. Statistical significance was evaluated with the Student T test and Fisher test (p <0.05). Results: 46 cervical-cancer patients were included (16 MRI [3 subMRI], 30 CT). CTV: overall, 55±53 cm3; MRI, 81±61 cm3; CT, 42±44 cm3 (p = 0.017). Stage: overall, 24 I/II and 22 III/IV; MRI, 3 I/II and 13 III/IV; CT, 21 I/II and 9 III/IV (p = 0.002). Use of needles: overall, 26 without and 20 with; MRI, 5 without and 11 with; CT, 21 without and 9 with (p = 0.015). CTV D90: overall, 82±5 Gy; MRI, 81±6 Gy; CT, 82±5 Gy (p = 0.78). SubMRI: CTV and D90 (as % of nominal fraction dose) were 23±6 cm3 and 124±3% for MRI-guided insertions and 21±5 cm3 (p = 0.83) and 106±12% (p = 0.15) for CT-guided insertions. Conclusion: Statistically significant differences in patient population indicate preferential use of MRI for patients with high-stage disease and large residual CTVs requiring the use of interstitial needles. CTV D90 was similar between groups, despite the difference in patient selection. For patients who underwent both CT and MRI insertions, a larger MR CTV D90 and similar CTVs between insertions were observed. While MRI is generally preferable to CT, MRI selection can be optimized in environments without a dedicated MRI brachytherapy suite. This work was partially funded by the NIH R21 CA167800 (PI: Viswanathan; aviswanathan@partners.org)},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924312},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To compare the contours and dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the tumor and organs at risk (OAR) with computed tomography (CT) vs. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cervical cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients underwent both MRI and CT after applicator insertion. The dose received by at least 90% of the volume (D{sub 90}), the minimal target dose (D{sub 100}), the volume treated to the prescription dose or greater for tumor for the high-risk (HR) and intermediate-risk (IR) clinical target volume (CTV) and the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for the OARsmore » were evaluated. A standardized approach to contouring on CT (CT{sub Std}) was developed, implemented (HR- and IR-CTV{sub CTStd}), and compared with the MRI contours. Results: Tumor height, thickness, and total volume measurements, as determined by either CT or CT{sub Std} were not significantly different compared with the MRI volumes. In contrast, the width measurements differed in HR-CTV{sub CTStd} (p = 0.05) and IR-CTV{sub CTStd} (p = 0.01). For the HR-CTV{sub CTStd}, this resulted in statistically significant differences in the volume treated to the prescription dose or greater (MRI, 96% vs. CT{sub Std}, 86%, p = 0.01), D{sub 100} (MRI, 5.4 vs. CT{sub Std}, 3.4, p <0.01), and D{sub 90} (MRI, 8.7 vs. CT{sub Std}, 6.7, p <0.01). Correspondingly, the IR-CTV DVH values on MRI vs. CT{sub Std}, differed in the D{sub 100} (MRI, 3.0 vs. CT{sub Std}, 2.2, p = 0.01) and D{sub 90} (MRI, 5.6 vs. CT{sub Std}, 4.6, p = 0.02). The MRI and CT DVH values of the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for the OARs were similar. Conclusion: Computed tomography-based or MRI-based scans at brachytherapy are adequate for OAR DVH analysis. However, CT tumor contours can significantly overestimate the tumor width, resulting in significant differences in the D{sub 90}, D{sub 100}, and volume treated to the prescription dose or greater for the HR-CTV compared with that using MRI. MRI remains the standard for CTV definition.« less
  • Purpose: We prospectively compared computed tomography (CT)– and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–based high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) contours at the time of brachytherapy for cervical cancer in an effort to identify patients who might benefit most from MRI-based planning. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients who had undergone a pretreatment diagnostic MRI scan were included in the analysis. We delineated the HR-CTV on the brachytherapy CT and brachytherapy MRI scans independently for each patient. We then calculated the absolute volumes for each HR-CTV and the Dice coefficient of similarity (DC, a measure of spatial agreement) for the HR-CTV contours. We identifiedmore » the clinical and tumor factors associated with (1) a discrepancy in volume between the CT HR-CTV and MRI HR-CTV contours; and (2) DC. The mean values were compared using 1-way analysis of variance or paired or unpaired t tests, as appropriate. Simple and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to model the effects of covariates on the outcomes. Results: Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical cancer were treated with intracavitary brachytherapy using tandem and ovoid (n=33) or tandem and cylinder (n=4) applicators. The mean CT HR-CTV volume (44.1 cm{sup 3}) was larger than the mean MRI HR-CTV volume (35.1 cm{sup 3}; P<.0001, paired t test). On multivariable analysis, a higher body mass index (BMI) and tumor size ≥5 cm with parametrial invasion on the MRI scan at diagnosis were associated with an increased discrepancy in volume between the HR-CTV contours (P<.02 for both). In addition, the spatial agreement (as measured by DC) between the HR-CTV contours decreased with an increasing BMI (P=.013). Conclusions: We recommend MRI-based brachytherapy planning for patients with tumors >5 cm and parametrial invasion on MRI at diagnosis and for those with a high BMI.« less
  • Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic,more » ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.« less
  • Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with themore » actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further investigation.« less
  • Purpose: Brachytherapy plays a crucial role in management of cervix cancer. MRI compatible applicators have made it possible to accurately delineate gross-target-volume(GTV) and organs-at-risk(OAR) volumes, as well as directly plan, optimize and adapt dose-distribution for each insertion. We sought to compare DVH of tumor-coverage and OARs to traditional Point-A, ICRU-38 bladder and rectum point-doses for four different planning-techniques. Methods: MRI based 3D-planning was performed on Nucletron-Oncentra-TPS for 3 selected patients with varying tumor-sizes and anatomy. GTV,high-risk-clinical-target-volume(HR-CTV), intermediate-risk-clinical-target-volume(IR-CTV) and OARs: rectum, bladder, sigmoid-colon, vaginal-mucosa were delineated. Three conventionally used techniques: mg-Radium-equivalent(RaEq),equal-dwell-weights(EDW), Medical-College-of-Wisconsin proposed points-optimization (MCWO) and a manual-graphical-optimization(MGO) volume-coverage based techniquemore » were applied for each patient. Prescription was 6Gy delivered to point-A in Conventional techniques (RaEq, EDW, MCWO). For MGO, goal was to achieve 90%-coverage (D90) to HR-CTV with prescription-dose. ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder, point-A doses, DVH-doses for HR-CTV-D90,0.1cc-volume(D0.1),1ccvolume( D1),2cc-volume(D2) were collected for all plans and analyzed . Results: Mean D90 for HR-CTV normalized to MGO were 0.89,0.84,0.9,1.0 for EDW, RaEq, MCWO, MGO respectively. Mean point-A doses were 21.7% higher for MGO. Conventional techniques with Point-A prescriptions under covered HR-CTV-D90 by average of 12% as compared to MGO. Rectum, bladder and sigmoid doses were highest in MGO-plans for ICRU points as well as D0.1,D1 and D2 doses. Among conventional-techniques, rectum and bladder ICRU and DVH doses(0.1,1,2cc) were not significantly different (within 7%).Rectum D0.1 provided good estimation of ICRU-rectum-point doses (within 3.9%),rectum D0.1 were higher from 0.8 to 3.9% while bladder D0.1 overestimated the bladder ICRU point dose up to 43% for conventional-techniques.Bladder-D2 provided a good estimation of ICRU bladder point-doses(within 3.6%) for conventional-techniques. This correlation is not observed for MGO plans perhaps due to steering of isodose line, leading to unpredictable dwell-weighting. Conclusion: MRI based HDR-planning provides accurate delineation of tumor volumes and normal structures, and optimized tumor-coverage can be achieved with acceptable normal-tissue doses. This study showed that for conventional techniques D0.1 rectum dose and D2 bladder dose are good representation of ICRU-reference-point doses.« less