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Title: SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the dosimetric equivalence of MRI based proton planning vs. single energy x-ray CT. Methods: 8 glioblastoma patients were imaged with CT and MRI after surgical resection. T1-weighted 3DMPRAGE was used to delineate the GTV, which was subsequently rigidly registered to the CT volume. A pseudoCT was generated from the aligned MRI by combining segmentation and atlas-based approaches. The spatial resolution both for pseudo- and real CT was 0.6×0.6×2.5mm. Three orthogonal proton beams were simulated on the pseudoCT. Two co-planar beams were set on the axial plane. The third one was planned parallel to the cranio-caudal (CC) direction. Each beam was set to cover the GTV at 98% of the nominal dose (18Gy). The proton plan was copied and transferred to the real CT, including aperture/compensator geometry. Dose comparison between pseudoCT and CT plan was performed beam-by-beam by quantifying the range shift of dose profile on each slice of the GTV. The GTV’s V{sub 98} was computed for the CT. Results: For beams in axial plane the median absolute value of the range shift was 0.3mm, with 0.9mm and 1.4mm as 95th percentile and maximum, respectively. Worst scenarios were found for the CC beam, where we measured 1.1mmmore » (median), 2.7mm (95thpercentile) and 5mm (maximum). Regardless the direction, beams passing through the surgical site, where metal (Titanium MRI-compatible) staples were present, were mostly affected by range shift. GTV’s V{sub 98} for CT was not lower than 99.3%. Conclusion: The study showed the clinical feasibility of an MRI-alone proton plan. Advantages include the possibility to rely on better soft tissue contrast for target and organs at risk delineation without the need of further CT scan and image registration. Additional investigation is required in presence of metal implants along the beam path and to account for partial volume effects due to slice thickness.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3]
  1. ImagEngLab, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro (Italy)
  2. Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States)
  3. Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22499325
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; GLIOMAS; IMAGE PROCESSING; NMR IMAGING; PLANNING; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SURGERY; TITANIUM

Citation Formats

Spadea, M, Izquierdo, D, Catana, C, Collins-Fekete, C, Bortfeld, T, and Seco, J. SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924308.
Spadea, M, Izquierdo, D, Catana, C, Collins-Fekete, C, Bortfeld, T, & Seco, J. SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924308.
Spadea, M, Izquierdo, D, Catana, C, Collins-Fekete, C, Bortfeld, T, and Seco, J. Mon . "SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924308.
@article{osti_22499325,
title = {SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning},
author = {Spadea, M and Izquierdo, D and Catana, C and Collins-Fekete, C and Bortfeld, T and Seco, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the dosimetric equivalence of MRI based proton planning vs. single energy x-ray CT. Methods: 8 glioblastoma patients were imaged with CT and MRI after surgical resection. T1-weighted 3DMPRAGE was used to delineate the GTV, which was subsequently rigidly registered to the CT volume. A pseudoCT was generated from the aligned MRI by combining segmentation and atlas-based approaches. The spatial resolution both for pseudo- and real CT was 0.6×0.6×2.5mm. Three orthogonal proton beams were simulated on the pseudoCT. Two co-planar beams were set on the axial plane. The third one was planned parallel to the cranio-caudal (CC) direction. Each beam was set to cover the GTV at 98% of the nominal dose (18Gy). The proton plan was copied and transferred to the real CT, including aperture/compensator geometry. Dose comparison between pseudoCT and CT plan was performed beam-by-beam by quantifying the range shift of dose profile on each slice of the GTV. The GTV’s V{sub 98} was computed for the CT. Results: For beams in axial plane the median absolute value of the range shift was 0.3mm, with 0.9mm and 1.4mm as 95th percentile and maximum, respectively. Worst scenarios were found for the CC beam, where we measured 1.1mm (median), 2.7mm (95thpercentile) and 5mm (maximum). Regardless the direction, beams passing through the surgical site, where metal (Titanium MRI-compatible) staples were present, were mostly affected by range shift. GTV’s V{sub 98} for CT was not lower than 99.3%. Conclusion: The study showed the clinical feasibility of an MRI-alone proton plan. Advantages include the possibility to rely on better soft tissue contrast for target and organs at risk delineation without the need of further CT scan and image registration. Additional investigation is required in presence of metal implants along the beam path and to account for partial volume effects due to slice thickness.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924308},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: With the increasing use of MRI simulation and the advent of MRI-guided delivery, it is desirable to use MRI only for treatment planning. In this study, we assess the dosimetric difference between MRI- and CTbased IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Planning CTs and MRIs acquired for a representative pancreatic cancer patient were used. MRI-based planning utilized forced relative electron density (rED) assignment of organ specific values from IRCU report 46, where rED = 1.029 for PTV and a rED = 1.036 for non-specified tissue (NST). Six IMRT plans were generated with clinical dose-volume (DV) constraints using a researchmore » Monaco planning system employing Monte Carlo dose calculation with optional perpendicular magnetic field (MF) of 1.5T. The following five plans were generated and compared with the planning CT: 1.) CT plan with MF and dose recalculation without optimization; 2.) MRI (T2) plan with target and OARs redrawn based on MRI, forced rED, no MF, and recalculation without optimization; 3.) Similar as in 2 but with MF; 4.) MRI plan with MF but without optimization; and 5.) Similar as in 4 but with optimization. Results: Generally, noticeable differences in PTV point doses and DV parameters (DVPs) between the CT-and MRI-based plans with and without the MF were observed. These differences between the optimized plans were generally small, mostly within 2%. Larger differences were observed in point doses and mean doses for certain OARs between the CT and MRI plan, mostly due to differences between image acquisition times. Conclusion: MRI only based IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer is feasible. The differences observed between the optimized CT and MRI plans with or without the MF were practically negligible if excluding the differences between MRI and CT defined structures.« less
  • Purpose: : To investigate dosimetric differences between MRI- and CT-based IMRT planning for prostate cancer, the impact of a magnetic field in a MRI-Linac, and to explore the feasibility of IMRT planning based on MRI alone. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on CT and MRI images acquired on two representative prostate-cancer patients using clinical dose volume constraints. A research planning system (Monaco, Elekta), which employs a Monte Carlo dose engine and includes a perpendicular magnetic field of 1.5T from an MRI-Linac, was used. Bulk electron density assignments based on organ-specific values from ICRU 46 were used to convert MRImore » (T2) to pseudo CT. With the same beam configuration as in the original CT plan, 5 additional plans were generated based on CT or MRI, with or without optimization (i.e., just recalculation) and with or without the magnetic field. The plan quality in terms of commonly used dose volume (DV) parameters for all plans was compared. The statistical uncertainty on dose was < 1%. Results: For plans with the same contour set but without re-optimization, the DV parameters were different from those for the original CT plan, mostly less than 5% with a few exceptions. These differences were reduced to mostly less than 3% when the plans were re-optimized. For plans with contours from MRI, the differences in the DV parameters varied depending on the difference in the contours as compared to CT. For the optimized plans with contours from MR, the differences for PTV were less than 3%. Conclusion: The prostate IMRT plans based on MRI-only for a MR-Linac were practically similar as compared to the CT plan under the same beam and optimization configuration if the difference on the structure delineation is excluded, indicating the feasibility of using MRI-only for prostate IMRT.« less
  • Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity valuesmore » of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm gamma index criteria were over 91%, 85%, and 38% with heterogeneous, dual bulk, and homogeneous sCTs, respectively. There were no significant changes to gamma index pass rates for IMPT plans first optimized in CT and then calculated in heterogeneous sCT versus IMPT plans first optimized in heterogeneous sCT and then calculated on standard CT. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that proton therapy dose calculations on heterogeneous sCTs are in good agreement with plans generated with standard planning CT. An MRI-only based RTP workflow is feasible in IMPT for brain tumors and prostate cancers.« less
  • Purpose: To demonstrate feasibility of proton dose calculation on scattercorrected CBCT images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: Two CBCT image sets were acquired from a prostate cancer patient and a thorax phantom using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. 2-D scatter maps were estimated using a previously introduced CT-based technique, and were subtracted from each raw projection image. A CBCT image set was then reconstructed with an open source reconstruction toolkit (RTK). Conversion from the CBCT number to HU was performed by soft tissue-based shifting with reference to the plan CT. Passively scatteredmore » proton plans were simulated on the plan CT and corrected/uncorrected CBCT images using the XiO treatment planning system. For quantitative evaluation, water equivalent path length (WEPL) was compared in those treatment plans. Results: The scatter correction method significantly improved image quality and HU accuracy in the prostate case where large scatter artifacts were obvious. However, the correction technique showed limited effects on the thorax case that was associated with fewer scatter artifacts. Mean absolute WEPL errors from the plans with the uncorrected and corrected images were 1.3 mm and 5.1 mm in the thorax case and 13.5 mm and 3.1 mm in the prostate case. The prostate plan dose distribution of the corrected image demonstrated better agreement with the reference one than that of the uncorrected image. Conclusion: A priori CT-based CBCT scatter correction can reduce the proton dose calculation error when large scatter artifacts are involved. If scatter artifacts are low, an uncorrected CBCT image is also promising for proton dose calculation when it is calibrated with the soft-tissue based shifting.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using a dual-energy CBCT (DECBCT) in proton therapy treatment planning to allow for accurate electron density estimation. Methods: For direct comparison, two scenarios were selected: a dual-energy fan-beam CT (high: 140 kVp, low: 80 kVp) and a DECBCT (high: 125 kVp, low: 80 kVp). A Gammex 467 tissue characterization phantom was used, including the rods of air, water, bone (B2–30% mineral), cortical bone (SB3), lung (LN-300), brain, liver and adipose. For the CBCT, Hounsfield Unit (HU) numbers were first obtained from the reconstructed images after a calibration wasmore » made based on water (=0) and air materials (=−1000). For each tissue surrogate, region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were made to derive high-energy and low-energy HU values (HUhigh and HUlow), which were subsequently used to estimate electron density based on the algorithm as previously described by Hunemohr N., et al. Parameters k1 and k2 are energy dependent and can be derived from calibration materials. Results: While for the dual-energy FBCT, the electron density is found be within +/−3% error relative to the values provided by the phantom vendor: −1.8% (water), 0.03% (lung), 1.1% (brain), −2.82% (adipose), −0.49% (liver) and −1.89% (cortical bones). While for the DECBCT, the estimation of electron density exhibits a relatively larger variation: −1.76% (water), −36.7% (lung), −1.92% (brain), −3.43% (adipose), 8.1% (liver) and 9.5% (cortical bones). Conclusion: For DECBCT, the accuracy of electron density estimation is inferior to that of a FBCT, especially for materials of either low-density (lung) or high density (cortical bone) compared to water. Such limitation arises from inaccurate HU number derivation in a CBCT. Advanced scatter-correction and HU calibration routines, as well as the deployment of photon counting CT detectors need be investigated to minimize the difference between FBCT and CBCT.« less