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Title: SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

Abstract

Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images,more » the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify and delineate seeds and calcifications.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22499318
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AGAR; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BRACHYTHERAPY; DOSE RATES; DOSIMETRY; GELS; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; NMR IMAGING; OPTIMIZATION; PALLADIUM 103; PHANTOMS; PROSTATE; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS

Citation Formats

Elzibak, A, Fatemi-Ardekani, A, Soliman, A, Mashouf, S, Safigholi, H, Ravi, A, Morton, G, Song, WY, Han, D, and University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924301.
Elzibak, A, Fatemi-Ardekani, A, Soliman, A, Mashouf, S, Safigholi, H, Ravi, A, Morton, G, Song, WY, Han, D, & University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924301.
Elzibak, A, Fatemi-Ardekani, A, Soliman, A, Mashouf, S, Safigholi, H, Ravi, A, Morton, G, Song, WY, Han, D, and University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA. Mon . "SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924301.
@article{osti_22499318,
title = {SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry},
author = {Elzibak, A and Fatemi-Ardekani, A and Soliman, A and Mashouf, S and Safigholi, H and Ravi, A and Morton, G and Song, WY and Han, D and University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify and delineate seeds and calcifications.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924301},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To propose a novel framework for accurate model-based dose calculations using only MR images for LDR prostate and breast seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: Model-based dose calculation methodologies recommended by TG-186 require further knowledge about specific tissue composition, which is challenging with MRI. However, relying on MRI-only for implant dosimetry would reduce the soft tissue delineation uncertainty, costs, and uncertainties associated with multi-modality registration and fusion processes. We propose a novel framework to address this problem using quantitative MRI acquisitions and reconstruction techniques. The framework includes three steps: (1) Identify the locations of seeds(2) Identify the presence (or absence) ofmore » calcification(s)(3) Quantify the water and fat content in the underlying tissueSteps (1) and (2) consider the sources that limit patient dosimetry, particularly the inter-seed attenuation and the calcified regions; while step (3) targets the quantification of the tissue composition to consider the heterogeneities in the medium. Our preliminary work has shown that the seeds and the calcifications can be identified with MRI using both the magnitude and the phase images. By employing susceptibility-weighted imaging with specific post-processing techniques, the phase images can be further explored to distinguish the seeds from the calcifications. Absolute quantification of tissue, water, and fat content is feasible and was previously demonstrated in phantoms and in-vivo applications, particularly for brain diseases. The approach relies on the proportionality of the MR signal to the number of protons in an image volume. By employing appropriate correction algorithms for T1 - and T2*-related biases, B1 transmit and receive field inhomogeneities, absolute water/fat content can be determined. Results: By considering calcification and interseed attenuation, and through the knowledge of water and fat mass density, accurate patient-specific implant dosimetry can be achieved with MRI-only. Conclusion: The proposed framework showed that model-based dose calculation is feasible using MRI-only state-of-the-art techniques.« less
  • Purpose: The current CT-based post-implant dosimetry allows precise seed localization but limited anatomical delineation. Switching to MR-based post-implant dosimetry is confounded by imprecise seed localization. One approach is to place positive-contrast markers (Sirius) adjacent to the negative-contrast seeds. This patient study aims to assess the utility of a 3D fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) sequence to visualize Sirius markers for post-implant dosimetry. Methods: MRI images were acquired in prostate implant patients (n=10) on Day 0 (day-of-implant) and Day 30. The post-implant MR protocol consisted of 3D T2-weighted fast-spin-echo (FSE), T2-weighted 2D-FSE (axial) and T1-weighted 2D-FSE (axial/sagittal/coronal). We incorporated a 3D-FSPGRmore » sequence into the post-implant MR protocol to visualize the Sirius markers. Patients were scanned with different number-of-excitations (6, 8, 10), field-of-view (10cm, 14cm, 18cm), slice thickness (1mm, 0.8mm), flip angle (14 degrees, 20 degrees), bandwidth (122.070 Hz/pixel, 325.508 Hz/pixel, 390.625 Hz/pixel), phase encoding steps (160, 192, 224, 256), frequency-encoding direction (right/left, anterior/posterior), echo-time type (minimum-full, out-of-phase), field strength (1.5T, 3T), contrast (with, without), scanner vendor (Siemens, GE), coil (endorectal-coil only, endorectal-and-torso-coil, torsocoil only), endorectal-coil filling (30cc, 50cc) and endorectal-coil filling type (air, perfluorocarbon [PFC]). For post-implant dosimetric evaluation with greater anatomical detail, 3D-FSE images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. For comparison with CT-based post-implant dosimetry, CT images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. Results: The 3D-FSPGR sequence facilitated visualization of markers in patients. Marker visualization helped distinguish signal voids as seeds versus needle tracks for more definitive MR-based post-implant dosimetry. On the CT-MR fused images, the distance between the seed on CT to MR images was 3.2±1.6mm in patients with no endorectal coil, 2.3±0.8mm in patients with 30cc-PFC-filled endorectal-coil and 5.0±1.8mm in patients with 50cc-PFC-filled endorectal-coil. Conclusion: An MR protocol to visualize positive-contrast Sirius markers to assist in the identification of negative-contrast seeds was demonstrated. S Frank is a co-founder of C4 Imaging LLC, the manufacturer of the MRI markers.« less
  • Purpose: This study aims at developing an MRI-only workflow for post-implant dosimetry of the prostate LDR brachytherapy seeds. The specific goal here is to develop a post-processing algorithm to produce positive contrast for the seeds and prostatic calcifications and differentiate between them on MR images. Methods: An agar-based phantom incorporating four dummy seeds (I-125) and five calcifications of different sizes (from sheep cortical bone) was constructed. Seeds were placed arbitrarily in the coronal plane. The phantom was scanned with 3T Philips Achieva MR scanner using an 8-channel head coil array. Multi-echo turbo spin echo (ME-TSE) and multi-echo gradient recalled echomore » (ME-GRE) sequences were acquired. Due to minimal susceptibility artifacts around seeds, ME-GRE sequence (flip angle=15; TR/TE=20/2.3/2.3; resolution=0.7×0.7×2mm3) was further processed.The induced field inhomogeneity due to the presence of titaniumencapsulated seeds was corrected using a B0 field map. B0 map was calculated using the ME-GRE sequence by calculating the phase difference at two different echo times. Initially, the product of the first echo and B0 map was calculated. The features corresponding to the seeds were then extracted in three steps: 1) the edge pixels were isolated using “Prewitt” operator; 2) the Hough transform was employed to detect ellipses approximately matching the dimensions of the seeds and 3) at the position and orientation of the detected ellipses an ellipse was drawn on the B0-corrected image. Results: The proposed B0-correction process produced positive contrast for the seeds and calcifications. The Hough transform based on Prewitt edge operator successfully identified all the seeds according to their ellipsoidal shape and dimensions in the edge image. Conclusion: The proposed post-processing algorithm successfully visualized the seeds and calcifications with positive contrast and differentiates between them according to their shapes. Further assessments on more realistic phantoms and patient study are required to validate the outcome.« less
  • A Monte Carlo (MC) study was carried out to evaluate the effects of the interseed attenuation and the tissue composition for two models of {sup 125}I low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds (Medi-Physics 6711, IBt InterSource) in a permanent breast implant. The effect of the tissue composition was investigated because the breast localization presents heterogeneities such as glandular and adipose tissue surrounded by air, lungs, and ribs. The absolute MC dose calculations were benchmarked by comparison to the absolute dose obtained from experimental results. Before modeling a clinical case of an implant in heterogeneous breast, the effects of the tissuemore » composition and the interseed attenuation were studied in homogeneous phantoms. To investigate the tissue composition effect, the dose along the transverse axis of the two seed models were calculated and compared in different materials. For each seed model, three seeds sharing the same transverse axis were simulated to evaluate the interseed effect in water as a function of the distance from the seed. A clinical study of a permanent breast {sup 125}I implant for a single patient was carried out using four dose calculation techniques: (1) A TG-43 based calculation, (2) a full MC simulation with realistic tissues and seed models, (3) a MC simulation in water and modeled seeds, and (4) a MC simulation without modeling the seed geometry but with realistic tissues. In the latter, a phase space file corresponding to the particles emitted from the external surface of the seed is used at each seed location. The results were compared by calculating the relevant clinical metrics V{sub 85}, V{sub 100}, and V{sub 200} for this kind of treatment in the target. D{sub 90} and D{sub 50} were also determined to evaluate the differences in dose and compare the results to the studies published for permanent prostate seed implants in literature. The experimental results are in agreement with the MC absolute doses (within 5% for EBT Gafchromic film and within 7% for TLD-100). Important differences between the dose along the transverse axis of the seed in water and in adipose tissue are obtained (10% at 3.5 cm). The comparisons between the full MC and the TG-43 calculations show that there are no significantdifferences for V{sub 85} and V{sub 100}. For V{sub 200}, 8.4% difference is found coming mainly from the tissue composition effect. Larger differences (about 10.5% for the model 6711 seed and about 13% for the InterSource{sup 125}) are determined for D{sub 90} and D{sub 50}. These differences depend on the composition of the breast tissue modeled in the simulation. A variation in percentage by mass of the mammary gland and adipose tissue can cause important differences in the clinical dose metrics V{sub 200}, D{sub 90}, and D{sub 50}. Even if the authors can conclude that clinically, the differences in V{sub 85}, V{sub 100}, and V{sub 200} are acceptable in comparison to the large variation in dose in the treated volume, this work demonstrates that the development of a MC treatment planning system for LDR brachytherapy will improve the dose determination in the treated region and consequently the dose-outcome relationship, especially for the skin toxicity.« less
  • Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio.more » Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over a range of clinical circumstances. These findings highlight the need for careful target localization and accurate identification of compression thickness and target offset. Prof. Rivard is a shareholder of Advanced Radiation Therapy, LLC, the manufacturer of the AccuBoost noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy system examined herein. None of the other authors have any conflicts-of-interest for this work.« less