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Title: SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for optic nerve tumors can potentially use planning target volume (PTV) expansions as small as 1–5 mm. However, the motion of the intraorbital segment of the optic nerve has not been studied. Methods: A subject with a right optic nerve sheath meningioma underwent CT simulation in three fixed gaze positions: right, left, and fixed forward at a marker. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs-at-risk (OAR) were contoured on all three scans. An IMRT plan using 10 static non-coplanar fields to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions was designed to treat the fixed-forward gazing GTV with a 1 mm PTV, then resulting coverage was evaluated for the GTV in the three positions. As an alternative, the composite structures were computed to generate the internal target volume (ITV), 1 mm expansion free-gazing PTV, and planning organat-risk volumes (PRVs) for free-gazing treatment. A comparable IMRT plan was created for the free-gazing PTV. Results: If the patient were treated using the fixed forward gaze plan looking straight, right, and left, the V100% for the GTV was 100.0%, 33.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. The volumes of the PTVs for fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.79 and 2.21 cc, respectively,more » increasing the PTV by a factor of 2.6. The V100% for the fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.85 cc and 2.8 cc, respectively increasing the treated volume by a factor of 3.3. Conclusion: Fixed gaze treatment appears to provide greater organ sparing than free-gazing. However unanticipated intrafraction right or left gaze can produce a geometric miss. Further study of optic nerve motion appears to be warranted in areas such as intrafraction optical confirmation of fixed gaze and optimized gaze directions to minimize lens and other normal organ dose in cranial radiotherapy.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22499292
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; HEALTH HAZARDS; LENSES; NEOPLASMS; ORGANS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Manning, M, and Maurer, J. SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924273.
Manning, M, & Maurer, J. SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924273.
Manning, M, and Maurer, J. Mon . "SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924273.
@article{osti_22499292,
title = {SU-E-J-187: Management of Optic Organ Motion in Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy},
author = {Manning, M and Maurer, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for optic nerve tumors can potentially use planning target volume (PTV) expansions as small as 1–5 mm. However, the motion of the intraorbital segment of the optic nerve has not been studied. Methods: A subject with a right optic nerve sheath meningioma underwent CT simulation in three fixed gaze positions: right, left, and fixed forward at a marker. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs-at-risk (OAR) were contoured on all three scans. An IMRT plan using 10 static non-coplanar fields to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions was designed to treat the fixed-forward gazing GTV with a 1 mm PTV, then resulting coverage was evaluated for the GTV in the three positions. As an alternative, the composite structures were computed to generate the internal target volume (ITV), 1 mm expansion free-gazing PTV, and planning organat-risk volumes (PRVs) for free-gazing treatment. A comparable IMRT plan was created for the free-gazing PTV. Results: If the patient were treated using the fixed forward gaze plan looking straight, right, and left, the V100% for the GTV was 100.0%, 33.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. The volumes of the PTVs for fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.79 and 2.21 cc, respectively, increasing the PTV by a factor of 2.6. The V100% for the fixed gaze and free-gazing plans were 0.85 cc and 2.8 cc, respectively increasing the treated volume by a factor of 3.3. Conclusion: Fixed gaze treatment appears to provide greater organ sparing than free-gazing. However unanticipated intrafraction right or left gaze can produce a geometric miss. Further study of optic nerve motion appears to be warranted in areas such as intrafraction optical confirmation of fixed gaze and optimized gaze directions to minimize lens and other normal organ dose in cranial radiotherapy.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924273},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Existing reports on gated radiation therapy focus mainly on optimizing dose delivery to the target structure. This work investigates the motion effects on radiation dose delivered to organs at risk (OAR) in respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A new algorithmic tool of dose analysis is developed to evaluate the optimality of gating phase for dose sparing on OARs while ensuring adequate target coverage. Methods: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer were treated on a phase I prospective study employing 4DCT-based SBRT. For each patient, 4DCT scans are acquired and sorted into 10 respiratory phases (inhale-exhale- inhale). Treatment planningmore » is performed on the average CT image. The average CT is spatially registered to other phases. The resultant displacement field is then applied on the plan dose map to estimate the actual dose map for each phase. Dose values of each voxel are fitted to a sinusoidal function. Fitting parameters of dose variation, mean delivered dose and optimal gating phase for each voxel over respiration cycle are mapped on the dose volume. Results: The sinusoidal function accurately models the dose change during respiratory motion (mean fitting error 4.6%). In the eight patients, mean dose variation is 3.3 Gy on OARs with maximum of 13.7 Gy. Two patients have about 100cm{sup 3} volumes covered by more than 5 Gy deviation. The mean delivered dose maps are similar to plan dose with slight deformation. The optimal gating phase highly varies across the patient, with phase 5 or 6 on about 60% of the volume, and phase 0 on most of the rest. Conclusion: A new algorithmic tool is developed to conveniently quantify dose deviation on OARs from plan dose during the respiratory cycle. The proposed software facilitates the treatment planning process by providing the optimal respiratory gating phase for dose sparing on each OAR.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effects of respiratory motion on the delivered dose distribution of CyberKnife motion tracking-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of abdominal targets. Methods: Four patients (two pancreas and two liver, and all with 4DCT scans) were retrospectively evaluated. A plan (3D plan) using CyberKnife Synchrony was optimized on the end-exhale phase in the CyberKnife's MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS), with 40Gy prescribed in 5 fractions. A 4D plan was then created following the 4D planning utility in the MultiPlan TPS, by recalculating dose from the 3D plan beams on all 4DCT phases, with the same prescribed isodose line.more » The other seven phases of the 4DCT were then deformably registered to the end-exhale phase for 4D dose summation. Doses to the target and organs at risk (OAR) were compared between 3D and 4D plans for each patient. The mean and maximum doses to duodenum, liver, spinal cord and kidneys, and doses to 5cc of duodenum, 700cc of liver, 0.25cc of spinal cord and 200cc of kidneys were used. Results: Target coverage in the 4D plans was about 1% higher for two patients and about 9% lower in the other two. OAR dose differences between 3D and 4D varied among structures, with doses as much as 8.26Gy lower or as much as 5.41Gy higher observed in the 4D plans. Conclusion: The delivered dose can be significantly different from the planned dose for both the target and OAR close to the target, which is caused by the relative geometry change while the beams chase the moving target. Studies will be performed on more patients in the future. The differences of motion tracking versus passive motion management with the use of internal target volumes will also be investigated.« less
  • Purpose: Respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal region could lead to significant underdosing of target and increased dose to healthy tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of respiratory motion in conventional 3D dose by comparing 4D deformable dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Five patients who had previously treated liver SBRT were included in this study. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images with 10 phases for all patients were acquired on multi-slice CT scanner (Siemens, Somatom definition). Conventional 3D planning was performed using the average intensity projection (AIP) images. 4D dose accumulation wasmore » calculated by summation of dose distribution for all phase images of 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR) . The target volume and normal organs dose were evaluated with the 4D dose and compared with those from 3D dose. And also, Index of achievement (IOA) which assesses the consistency between planned dose and prescription dose was used to compare target dose distribution between 3D and 4D dose. Results: Although the 3D dose calculation considered the moving target coverage, significant differences of various dosimetric parameters between 4D and 3D dose were observed in normal organs and PTV. The conventional 3D dose overestimated dose to PTV, however, there was no significant difference for GTV. The average difference of IOA which become ‘1’ in an ideal case was 3.2% in PTV. The average difference of liver and duodenum was 5% and 16% respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose accumulation which can provide dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT&Future Planning (MSIP) of Korea.« less
  • Purpose: We aim to achieve new four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) using the next generation real-time tumor-tracking (RTRT) system and flattening-filter-free techniques. To achieve new 4DRT, it is necessary to understand the respiratory motion of tumor. The purposes of this study were: 1.To develop the respiratory motion analysis tool using log files. 2.To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) during stereotactic body RT (SBRT) of lung tumor. Methods: Seven patients having fiducial markers closely implanted to the lung tumor were enrolled in this study. The positions of fiducial markers were measured using the RTRT system (Mitsubishi Electronics Co.,more » JP) and recorded as two types of log files during the course of SBRT. For each patients, tumor motion range and tumor motion PDFs in left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions were calculated using log files of all beams per fraction (PDFn). Fractional PDF reproducibility (Rn) was calculated as Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence between PDF1 and PDFn of tumor motion. The mean of Rn (Rm) was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient’s mean tumor motion range (Am). The change of Rm during the course of SBRT was also evluated. These analyses were performed using in-house developed software. Results: The Rm were 0.19 (0.07–0.30), 0.14 (0.07–0.32) and 0.16 (0.09–0.28) in LR, AP and SI directions, respectively. The Am were 5.11 mm (2.58–9.99 mm), 7.81 mm (2.87–15.57 mm) and 11.26 mm (3.80–21.27 mm) in LR, AP and SI directions, respectively. The PDF reproducibility decreased as the tumor motion range increased in AP and SI direction. That decreased slightly through the course of RT in SI direction. Conclusion: We developed the respiratory motion analysis tool for 4DRT using log files and quantified the range and reproducibility of respiratory motion for lung tumors.« less
  • Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using themore » CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)« less