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Title: SU-E-T-606: Performance of MR-Based 3D FXG Dosimetry for Preclinical Irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: Technological advances have revolutionized preclinical radiation research to enable precise radiation delivery in preclinical models. Kilovoltage x-rays and complex geometries in preclinical radiation studies challenge conventional dosimetry methods. Previously developed gel-based dosimetry provides a viable means of accommodating complex geometries and accurately reporting dose at kV energies. This paper will describe the development and evaluation of gel-based ferrous xylenol-orange (FXG) dosimetry using a 7T preclinical imaging system. Methods: To confirm water equivalence, Zeff values were calculated for the FXG material, water and ICRU defined soft tissue. Proton T1 relaxivity response in FXG was measured using a preclinical 7T MR and a small animal irradiator for a dose range of 1–22 Gy. FXG was contained in 50 ml centrifuge tubes and irradiated with a 225 kVp x-ray beam at a nominal dose rate of 2.3 Gy/min. Pre and post irradiation maps of the T1 relaxivity were collected using variable TR spin-echo imaging (TE 6.65 ms; TR 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000 and 5000 ms) with 2 mm thick slices, 0.325 mm/pixel, 3 averages and an acquisition time of 26 minutes. A linear fit to the change in relaxation rate (1/T1) for the delivered doses reported the gel sensitivity inmore » units of ms{sup -1}Gy{sup -1}. Irradiation and imaging studies were repeated using three batches of gel over 72 hrs. Results: FXG has a Zeff of 3.8 for the 225 kVp spectrum used; differing from water and ICRU defined soft tissue by 0.5% and 2.5%, respectively. The average sensitivity for the FXG dosimeter was 31.5 ± 0.7 ms{sup -1}Gy{sup -1} (R{sup 2} = 0.9957) with a y-intercept of −29.4 ± 9.0 ms{sup -1}. Conclusion: Preliminary results for the FXG dosimeter properties, sensitivity, and dose linearity at preclinical energies is promising. Future work will explore anatomically relevant tissue inclusions to test MR performance. Student funding provided by The Terry Fox Foundation Strategic Initiative for Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century at CIHR and the Gifford Ontario Student Opportunity Trust Fund.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496319
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CHEMICAL DOSEMETERS; DOSE RATES; DOSIMETRY; GY RANGE 01-10; GY RANGE 10-100; IMAGES; IRRADIATION; IRRADIATION DEVICES; PERFORMANCE; RADIOSENSITIVITY; RADIOTHERAPY; XYLENOL ORANGE

Citation Formats

Welch, M, Jaffray, D, Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, and TECHNA Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, ON. SU-E-T-606: Performance of MR-Based 3D FXG Dosimetry for Preclinical Irradiation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924969.
Welch, M, Jaffray, D, Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, & TECHNA Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, ON. SU-E-T-606: Performance of MR-Based 3D FXG Dosimetry for Preclinical Irradiation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924969.
Welch, M, Jaffray, D, Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, and TECHNA Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, ON. Mon . "SU-E-T-606: Performance of MR-Based 3D FXG Dosimetry for Preclinical Irradiation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924969.
@article{osti_22496319,
title = {SU-E-T-606: Performance of MR-Based 3D FXG Dosimetry for Preclinical Irradiation},
author = {Welch, M and Jaffray, D and Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON and TECHNA Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, ON},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Technological advances have revolutionized preclinical radiation research to enable precise radiation delivery in preclinical models. Kilovoltage x-rays and complex geometries in preclinical radiation studies challenge conventional dosimetry methods. Previously developed gel-based dosimetry provides a viable means of accommodating complex geometries and accurately reporting dose at kV energies. This paper will describe the development and evaluation of gel-based ferrous xylenol-orange (FXG) dosimetry using a 7T preclinical imaging system. Methods: To confirm water equivalence, Zeff values were calculated for the FXG material, water and ICRU defined soft tissue. Proton T1 relaxivity response in FXG was measured using a preclinical 7T MR and a small animal irradiator for a dose range of 1–22 Gy. FXG was contained in 50 ml centrifuge tubes and irradiated with a 225 kVp x-ray beam at a nominal dose rate of 2.3 Gy/min. Pre and post irradiation maps of the T1 relaxivity were collected using variable TR spin-echo imaging (TE 6.65 ms; TR 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000 and 5000 ms) with 2 mm thick slices, 0.325 mm/pixel, 3 averages and an acquisition time of 26 minutes. A linear fit to the change in relaxation rate (1/T1) for the delivered doses reported the gel sensitivity in units of ms{sup -1}Gy{sup -1}. Irradiation and imaging studies were repeated using three batches of gel over 72 hrs. Results: FXG has a Zeff of 3.8 for the 225 kVp spectrum used; differing from water and ICRU defined soft tissue by 0.5% and 2.5%, respectively. The average sensitivity for the FXG dosimeter was 31.5 ± 0.7 ms{sup -1}Gy{sup -1} (R{sup 2} = 0.9957) with a y-intercept of −29.4 ± 9.0 ms{sup -1}. Conclusion: Preliminary results for the FXG dosimeter properties, sensitivity, and dose linearity at preclinical energies is promising. Future work will explore anatomically relevant tissue inclusions to test MR performance. Student funding provided by The Terry Fox Foundation Strategic Initiative for Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century at CIHR and the Gifford Ontario Student Opportunity Trust Fund.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924969},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To determine if a MOSFET based in-vivo dosimetry system can be used for patients undergoing MR-IGRT. Methods: Standard and high sensitivity MOSFET detectors were used for in-field and out-of-field measurements respectively. The systems were benchmarked and calibrated against a calibrated ionization chamber on a standard 6 MV linear accelerator, and then on the MR-IGRT system. Known doses were delivered to a water phantom with the MOSFETs placed between the top of the phantom and underneath a layer of bolus and water equivalent plastic, using a 6 MV beam and a {sup 6} {sup 0}Co MR-IGRT beam. The latter wasmore » performed with and without real-time MRI-guidance during the beam delivery (MRIGRT). Results: The in-field dosimeter response was linear from 50-500 cGy with little evidence of energy dependence or change in response due to the permanent static magnetic field of the MR-IGRT system. The detector response varied by < 2% between 6 MV and {sup 6} {sup 0}Co without image guided delivery. The out-of-field dosimeter response was linear from 1-50 cGy; however the detectors did display dose rate and energy dependence as the response varied by > 20% depending on distance from isocenter used during calibration. Therefore, to use the dosimeters for out-of-field measurements they must be calibrated out-of-field. Regardless of the detector orientation in the coronal plan, the response of the MOSFETs during MRI-guided delivery increased by 5% due to induced currents from the dynamic magnetic field present with image guidance. During the MRI-guided delivery, some loss in image quality was seen when the MOSFETs were present in the imaging plane. This was mitigated by using a handheld reader without a transmitting wireless receiver. Conclusion: A MOSFET-based in-vivo dosimetry system can be used for patients receiving MR-IGRT; however the change in detector response due to the dynamic magnetic field requires a special calibration.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate a calibration method using the depth-dose data of an electron beam for MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: MAGAT was manufactured in-house to fill two 400mL-cylindrical phantoms and nine 22mL-glass vials. Phantom-A was irradiated along the cylinder axis with a 9MeV electron beam of 6 cm x 6 cm field size (FS). Phantom-B was irradiated with a 6MV photon beam of 3 cm x 3 cm FS by a 360-degree arc technique. Eight vials were irradiated in a water-bath to various doses with a 20 cm x 20 cm FS 6MV photon beam. All irradiated phantoms and onemore » un-irradiated vial were scanned with a 3T MRI scanner to obtain the spin-spin relaxation rate (R2) distributions. By comparing the measured R2-to-depth data with the known depth-dose data for Phantom-A, R2-to-dose calibration data were obtained (e-beam method). Another calibration data were obtained from the 9 vials data (9-vial method). We tested two regression equations, i.e., third-order polynomial and tangent functions, and two dose normalization methods, i.e., one-point and two-point methods. Then, these two calibration methods were used to obtain the 3D dose distribution of Phantom-B and evaluated by comparing the measured data with the dose distribution from a treatment planning system. The comparison was made with gamma passing rate (2%/2mm criteria). Results: We did not observe a clear advantage of the e-beam method over the 9-vial method for the 3D dose comparison with the test case. Nevertheless, we found that the e-beam method required a smaller dose scaling for the dose comparison. Furthermore, the tangent function showed better data fitting than the polynomial function with smaller uncertainty of the estimated coefficients. Conclusions: Considering the overall superior performance, we recommend the e-beam method with the tangent function as the regression equation and one-point dose normalization for the MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry.« less
  • Purpose: The current CT-based post-implant dosimetry allows precise seed localization but limited anatomical delineation. Switching to MR-based post-implant dosimetry is confounded by imprecise seed localization. One approach is to place positive-contrast markers (Sirius) adjacent to the negative-contrast seeds. This patient study aims to assess the utility of a 3D fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) sequence to visualize Sirius markers for post-implant dosimetry. Methods: MRI images were acquired in prostate implant patients (n=10) on Day 0 (day-of-implant) and Day 30. The post-implant MR protocol consisted of 3D T2-weighted fast-spin-echo (FSE), T2-weighted 2D-FSE (axial) and T1-weighted 2D-FSE (axial/sagittal/coronal). We incorporated a 3D-FSPGRmore » sequence into the post-implant MR protocol to visualize the Sirius markers. Patients were scanned with different number-of-excitations (6, 8, 10), field-of-view (10cm, 14cm, 18cm), slice thickness (1mm, 0.8mm), flip angle (14 degrees, 20 degrees), bandwidth (122.070 Hz/pixel, 325.508 Hz/pixel, 390.625 Hz/pixel), phase encoding steps (160, 192, 224, 256), frequency-encoding direction (right/left, anterior/posterior), echo-time type (minimum-full, out-of-phase), field strength (1.5T, 3T), contrast (with, without), scanner vendor (Siemens, GE), coil (endorectal-coil only, endorectal-and-torso-coil, torsocoil only), endorectal-coil filling (30cc, 50cc) and endorectal-coil filling type (air, perfluorocarbon [PFC]). For post-implant dosimetric evaluation with greater anatomical detail, 3D-FSE images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. For comparison with CT-based post-implant dosimetry, CT images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. Results: The 3D-FSPGR sequence facilitated visualization of markers in patients. Marker visualization helped distinguish signal voids as seeds versus needle tracks for more definitive MR-based post-implant dosimetry. On the CT-MR fused images, the distance between the seed on CT to MR images was 3.2±1.6mm in patients with no endorectal coil, 2.3±0.8mm in patients with 30cc-PFC-filled endorectal-coil and 5.0±1.8mm in patients with 50cc-PFC-filled endorectal-coil. Conclusion: An MR protocol to visualize positive-contrast Sirius markers to assist in the identification of negative-contrast seeds was demonstrated. S Frank is a co-founder of C4 Imaging LLC, the manufacturer of the MRI markers.« less
  • Purpose: To achieve desirable lung doses in total body irradiation (TBI) based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensation. Methods: The 15 MV photon beam of a Varian TrueBeam STx linac was used for TBI. Patients were positioned in the lateral decubitus position for AP/PA treatment delivery. Dose was calculated using the midpoint of the separation distance across the patient’s umbilicus. Patients received 200 cGy twice daily for 3 days. The dose rate at the patient’s midplane was approximately 10 cGy/min. Cerrobend blocks with a 5-HVL thickness were used for the primary lung shielding. A custom styrofoam holder formore » rice-flour filled bags was created based on the lung block cutouts. This was used to provide further lung shielding based on in vivo dose measurements. Lucite plates and rice-flour bags were placed in the head, neck, chest, and lower extremity regions during the treatment to compensate for the beam off-axis output variations. Two patients were included in the study. Patients 1 and 2 received a craniospinal treatment (1080 cGy) and a mediastinum treatment (2520 cGy), respectively, before the TBI. During the TBI nanoDot dosimeters were placed on the patient skin in the forehead, neck, umbilicus, and lung regions for dose monitoring. The doses were readout immediately after the treatment. Based on the readings, fine tuning of the thickness of the rice-flour filled bags was exploited to achieve the desirable lung doses. Results: For both patients the mean lung doses, which took into consideration all treatments, were controlled within 900 +/−10% cGy, as desired. Doses to the forehead, neck, and umbilicus were achieved within +/−10% of the prescribed dose (1200 cGy). Conclusion: A reliable and robust method was developed to achieve desirable lung doses and uniform body dose in TBI based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensator.« less
  • Purpose: The construction of a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) from a magnetic resonance image (MRI) is possible if the cortical bone signal can be acquired and separated from air and soft tissue. This may be accomplished by subtracting a long echo-time, in-phase, gradient echo (GRE) image volume from an ultra-short echo time free induction decay (FID) image to produce a bone-enhanced (BE) image that reveals cortical bone. One limitation of this approach is the length of time required for data acquisition, which can limit the quality of the DRRs due to patient and organ motion. This study aimed to significantlymore » reduce the acquisition time without compromising DRR quality. Methods: Brain data were acquired from two volunteers using a 3T MR scanner (Ingenia, Philips Healthcare). The FID and GRE images were acquired in a single acquisition using a 3D radial readout sequence with the following parameters: TE1=0.142ms (ultra-short), TE2=2.197ms (nearly in-phase), 2*2*2mm3 isotropic voxels, 250*250*250mm3 FOV. To reduce the acquisition time, k-space was sampled at 75, 50 and 25% of a full 3D sphere . The TE2 image was subtracted from the TE1 image to generate the BE images. The BE images were used to generate DRRs using the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips-version 9.2). The quality of the DRRs was evaluated qualitatively by 5 board certified medical physicists for clinical usefulness. Results: The acquisition time for 75, 50 and 25% sampling schemes were 219s, 146s, and 73s, respectively, the latter of which was a four-fold reduction in scan time compared to a 300s fully-sampled acquisition. All DRRs obtained were of acceptable quality and were shown to have sufficient information for clinical 2D image matching. Conclusion: Undersampling k-space while maintaining the same range of frequency information results in significantly reduced scan time and clinically acceptable DRR image quality. Drs. B Traughber and R Muzic have research support from Philips Healthcare. Drs. M Traughber and L Hu are employees of Philips Healthcare.« less