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Title: SU-E-T-592: OSL Response of Al2O3:C Detectors Exposed to Therapeutic Proton Beams

Abstract

Purpose: To characterize the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) exposed to therapeutic proton beams of differing beam quality. Methods: We prepared Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs from the same material as commercially available nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc). We irradiated the OSLDs in modulated proton beams of varying quality, as defined by the residual range. An absorbed dose to water of 0.2 Gy was delivered to all OSLDs with the residual range values varying from 0.5 to 23.5 cm (average LET in water from ∼0.5 to 2.5 keV/µm). To investigate the beam quality dependence of different emission bands within the OSL spectrum, we performed OSLD readouts using both continuous-wave stimulation (CW-OSL) and pulsed stimulation (P-OSL) with two sets of optical filters (Hoya U-340 and Kopp 5113). For all readout modes, the relative absorbed dose sensitivity ( S{sub rel}) for each beam quality was calculated using OSLDs irradiated in a 6 MV photon beam as a reference. Results: We found that the relative absorbed dose sensitivity was highly dependent on both readout mode and integration time of the OSL signal. For CW-OSL signals containing only the blue emission band, S{sub rel} was between 0.85 and 0.94 formore » 1 s readouts and between 0.82 and 0.93 for 10 s readouts. Similarly, for P-OSL readouts containing only the blue emission band S{sub rel} ranged from 0.86 to 0.91, and 0.82 to 0.93 for 1 s and 10 s readouts, respectively. For OSLD signals containing only the UV emission band, S{sub rel} ranged from 1.00 to 1.46, and 0.97 to 1.30 for P-OSL readouts of 1 s and 10 s, respectively. Conclusion: For measurements of absorbed dose using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs in therapeutic proton beams, dependence on beam quality was smallest for readout protocols that selected the blue emission band with small integration times. DA Granville received financial support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)
  2. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496305
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ABSORBED RADIATION DOSES; ALUMINIUM OXIDES; DOSEMETERS; DOSIMETRY; GY RANGE 01-10; KEV RANGE 01-10; PHOTON BEAMS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIOTHERAPY; READOUT SYSTEMS; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Granville, DA, Flint, DB, and Sawakuchi, GO. SU-E-T-592: OSL Response of Al2O3:C Detectors Exposed to Therapeutic Proton Beams. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924955.
Granville, DA, Flint, DB, & Sawakuchi, GO. SU-E-T-592: OSL Response of Al2O3:C Detectors Exposed to Therapeutic Proton Beams. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924955.
Granville, DA, Flint, DB, and Sawakuchi, GO. Mon . "SU-E-T-592: OSL Response of Al2O3:C Detectors Exposed to Therapeutic Proton Beams". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924955.
@article{osti_22496305,
title = {SU-E-T-592: OSL Response of Al2O3:C Detectors Exposed to Therapeutic Proton Beams},
author = {Granville, DA and Flint, DB and Sawakuchi, GO},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To characterize the response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) exposed to therapeutic proton beams of differing beam quality. Methods: We prepared Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs from the same material as commercially available nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc). We irradiated the OSLDs in modulated proton beams of varying quality, as defined by the residual range. An absorbed dose to water of 0.2 Gy was delivered to all OSLDs with the residual range values varying from 0.5 to 23.5 cm (average LET in water from ∼0.5 to 2.5 keV/µm). To investigate the beam quality dependence of different emission bands within the OSL spectrum, we performed OSLD readouts using both continuous-wave stimulation (CW-OSL) and pulsed stimulation (P-OSL) with two sets of optical filters (Hoya U-340 and Kopp 5113). For all readout modes, the relative absorbed dose sensitivity (S{sub rel}) for each beam quality was calculated using OSLDs irradiated in a 6 MV photon beam as a reference. Results: We found that the relative absorbed dose sensitivity was highly dependent on both readout mode and integration time of the OSL signal. For CW-OSL signals containing only the blue emission band, S{sub rel} was between 0.85 and 0.94 for 1 s readouts and between 0.82 and 0.93 for 10 s readouts. Similarly, for P-OSL readouts containing only the blue emission band S{sub rel} ranged from 0.86 to 0.91, and 0.82 to 0.93 for 1 s and 10 s readouts, respectively. For OSLD signals containing only the UV emission band, S{sub rel} ranged from 1.00 to 1.46, and 0.97 to 1.30 for P-OSL readouts of 1 s and 10 s, respectively. Conclusion: For measurements of absorbed dose using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs in therapeutic proton beams, dependence on beam quality was smallest for readout protocols that selected the blue emission band with small integration times. DA Granville received financial support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924955},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: OSL detectors are commonly used in clinic due to their numerous advantages, such as linear response, negligible energy, angle and temperature dependence in clinical range, for verification of the doses beyond the dmax. Although, due to the bulky shielding envelope, this type of detectors fails to measure skin dose, which is an important assessment of patient ability to finish the treatment on time and possibility of acute side effects. This study aims to optimize the methodology of determination of skin dose for conventional accelerators and a flattening filter free Tomotherapy. Methods: Measurements were done for x-ray beams: 6 MVmore » (Varian Clinac 2300, 10×10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm) and for 5.5 MV (Tomotherapy, 15×40 cm{sup 2} field, SAD = 85 cm). The detectors were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth (dref=1.7cm (Varian 2300), dref =1.0 cm (Tomotherapy)). The measurements for OSLs were related to the externally exposed OSLs measurements, and further were corrected to surface dose using an extrapolation method indexed to the baseline Attix ion chamber measurements. A consistent use of the extrapolation method involved: 1) irradiation of three OSLs stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. Results: OSL measurements showed an overestimation of surface doses by the factor 2.31 for Varian 2300 and 2.65 for Tomotherapy. The relationships: SD{sup 2300} = 0.68 × M{sup 2300}-12.7 and SDτoμo = 0.73 × Mτoμo-13.1 were found to correct the single OSL measurements to surface doses in agreement with Attix measurements to within 0.1% for both machines. Conclusion: This work provides simple empirical relationships for surface dose measurements using single OSL detectors.« less
  • Purpose: The application of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) may be extended to clinical investigations verifying irradiated doses in small animal models. In proton beams, the accurate positioning of the Bragg peak is essential for tumor targeting. The purpose of this study was to estimate the displacement of a pristine Bragg peak when an Al2O3:C nanodot (Landauer, Inc.) is placed on the surface of a water phantom and to evaluate corresponding changes in dose. Methods: Clinical proton pencil beam simulations were carried out with using TOPAS, a Monte Carlo platform layered on top of GEANT4. Point-shaped beams with no energymore » spread were modeled for energies 100MV, 150MV, 200MV, and 250MV. Dose scoring for 100,000 particle histories was conducted within a water phantom (20cm × 20cm irradiated area, 40cm depth) with its surface placed 214.5cm away from the source. The modeled nanodot had a 4mm radius and 0.2mm thickness. Results: A comparative analysis of Monte Carlo depth dose profiles modeled for these proton pencil beams did not demonstrate an energy dependent in the Bragg peak shift. The shifts in Bragg Peak depth for water phantoms modeled with a nanodot on the phantom surface ranged between 2.7 to 3.2 mm. In all cases, the Bragg Peaks were shifted closer to the irradiation source. The peak dose in phantoms with an OSLD remained unchanged with percent dose differences less than 0.55% when compared to phantom doses without the nanodot. Conclusion: Monte Carlo calculations show that the presence of OSLD nanodots in proton beam therapy will not change the position of a pristine Bragg Peak by more than 3 mm. Although the 3.0 mm shift will not have a detrimental effect in patients receiving proton therapy, this effect may not be negligible in dose verification measurements for mouse models at lower proton beam energies.« less
  • Purpose: In premise of uninfluenced to dose distribution of tumor target and organ at risk(OAR) in cervical cancer,area of segment fields was changed to increase efficacy and optimize treatment method by designing different plan of intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT). Methods: 12 cases of cervical cancer were confirmed in pathology and treated with step and shoot IMRT. Dose of PTV was 50Gy/25fractions. Every patient was designed 9 treatment plans of IMRT by Pinnacle 8.0m planning system,each plan was used with 9 beams of uniform distribution and fixing incidence direction(200°,240°,280°,320°,0°,40°,80°,120°and 160°respectively),and designed for delivery on Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. All plans were optimizedmore » with the direct machine parameter optimization(DMPO) algorithm using the same set of optimization objectives. Number of maximum segment field was defined at 80 and minimum MU in each segment was 5MU,and minimal segment area was 2*1cm{sup 2},2*2cm{sup 2},3*3cm{sup 2},4*4cm{sup 2},5*5cm{sup 2},6*6cm{sup 2},7*7cm{sup 2},8*8cm{sup 2}and 9*9cm{sup 2},respectively.Coverage,homogeneity and conformity of PTV,sparing of OAR, MU and number of segment were compared. Results: In this group, mean volume of PTV was 916.8±228.7 cm{sup 3}. Compared with the area of minimal segment field increased from 2*1cm{sup 2} to 9*9 cm{sup 2},the number of mean MU was decreased from 1405±170 to 490±47 and the number of segment field was reduced from 76±4 to 39±7 respectively(p<0.05). When the limit of minimal segment area was increased from 2*1cm{sup 2} to 7*7 cm{sup 2},dose distribution of PTV,OAR,CI,HI and V{sub 2} {sub 3} were not different (p>0.05),but when the minimal segment area was 8*8 cm{sup 2} and 9*9 cm{sup 2},they were changed compared with 7*7 cm{sup 2} and below(p<0.05). Conclusion: The minimal segment field of IMRT plan designed by Pinnacle 8.0m planning system in cervical carcinoma should be enlarge reasonably and minimal segment area of 7*7 cm{sup 2} was recommend.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the off axis relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for actively scanned proton beams and determine if a constant radial RBE can be assumed. Methods: The PHITS Monte Carlo code paired with a microscopic analytical function was used to determine probability distribution functions of the lineal energy in 0.3µm diameter spheres throughout a water phantom. Twenty million primary protons were simulated for a 0.6cm diameter pencil beam. Beam energies corresponding to Bragg Peak depths of 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300mm were used and evaluated transversely every millimeter and radially for annuli of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 3.2, 3.4,more » 3.6, 4.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0 and 25.0mm outer radius. The acquired probability distributions were reduced to dose-mean lineal energies and applied to the modified microdosimetric kinetic model, for human submandibular gland (HSG) cells, to calculate relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to 60Co beams at the 10% survival threshold. Results: RBE was generally seen to increase as distance from the central axis (CAX) increased. However, this increase was only seen in low dose regions and its overall effects on the transverse biological dose remains low. In the entrance region of the phantom (10mm depth), minimum and maximum calculated RBEs varied between 15.22 and 18.88% for different energies. At the Bragg peak, this difference ranged from 3.15 to 26.77%. Despite these rather large variations the dose-weighted RBE and the CAX RBE varied by less than 0.14% at 10mm depth and less than 0.16% at the Bragg peak. Similarly small variations were found at all depths proximal of the Bragg peak. Conclusion: Although proton RBE does vary radially, its overall effect on biological dose is minimal and the use of a radially constant RBE in treatment planning for scanned proton beams would not produce large errors.« less
  • Purpose: A fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov radiation has been widely studied for use as a dosimeter for proton therapeutic beam. Although the fiber-optic radiation sensor has already been investigated for proton therapeutic, it has been examined relatively little work for clinical therapeutic proton beams. In this study, we evaluated characteristics of a fiber-optic radiation sensor for clinical therapeutic proton beams. We experimentally evaluated dose-rate dependence, dose response and energy dependence for the proton beam. Methods: A fiber-optic radiation sensor was placed in a water phantom. Beams with energies of low, middle and high were used in the passively-scattered protonmore » therapeutic beam at the National Cancer Center in Korea. The sensor consists of two plastic optical fibers (POF). A reference POF and 2 cm longer POF were used to utilize the subtraction method for having sensitive volume. Each POF is optically coupled to the Multi-Anode Photo Multiplier Tube (MAPMT) and the MAPMT signals are processed using National Instruments Data Acquisition System (NI-DAQ). We were investigated dosimetric properties including dose-rate dependence, dose response and energy dependence. Results: We have successfully evaluated characteristics of a fiber optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov radiation. The fiber-optic radiation sensor showed the dose response linearity and low energy dependence. In addition, as the dose-rate was increased, Cerenkov radiation increased linearly. Conclusion: We evaluated the basic characteristics of the fiber optic radiation sensor, the dosimetry tool, to raise the quality of proton therapy. Based on the research, we developed a real time dosimetry system of the optic fiber to confirm the real time beam position and energy for therapeutic proton pencil beam.« less