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Title: SU-E-T-581: On the Value of LET as a Radiation Quality Descriptor for RBE

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the relationship between linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for protons and light ions, and the corresponding role of LET as a descriptor of radiation quality of hadron therapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) proton and light ion (He, Li, C) tracks with LET < 30 eV nm{sup -1} were generated in an event-by-event mode. They were overlaid on a cell nucleus model containing 6×10{sup 9} nucleotide base pairs using an isotropic irradiation procedure that provides electronic equilibrium. Strand breaks (sbs) were scored in the DNA sugar-phosphate groups and further sub-classified into single or double sbs (ssbs or dsbs). Distributions of ssbs and dsbs for 2 Gy fractions were calculated to estimate RBE for the induction of initial dsbs with reference to {sup 60}Co. Additionally, sbs were classified based on their complexity (i.e. the number of sbs in each cluster). Results: An increase in LET for light ions of the same atomic number or a decrease in atomic number for ions of the same LET resulted in a lower kinetic energy of emitted secondary electrons. The clustering of DNA damage was more pronounced as reflected by the increase in proton RBE from ∼ 1.75 tomore » 4 for LET values of 7 to 28 eV nm{sup -1}. A significant RBE decrease between protons, He, Li and C ions of the same LET was also noticed as function of the atomic number. Significant differences in ssbs and dsbs complexities were also seen for particles with the same LET, potentially supporting a clustering-based radiation quality descriptor. Conclusion: The LET-RBE relationships were simulated for proton and light ions and exhibited expected trends, including different RBEs for particles with the same LET but different atomic numbers. A complexity based radiation quality descriptor may allow better differentiation of RBE between radiation fields of similar LET. We would like to acknowledge support from the Fonds de recherche du Quebec Sante (FRQS), from the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network grant (number 432290) of NSERC, support from NSERC under grants RGPIN 397711-11 and RGPIN-2014-06475 and support from CIHR under grants MOP-114910, MOP-136774 and MOP-102550.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)
  2. Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496294
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ATOMIC NUMBER; CARBON IONS; GY RANGE 01-10; IRRADIATION PROCEDURES; LIGHT IONS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PROTONS; RADIATION QUALITY; RADIOTHERAPY; RBE; SIMULATION; STRAND BREAKS

Citation Formats

Pater, P, Backstrom, G, Enger, S, Seuntjens, J, Naqa, I El, Villegas, F, and Ahnesjo, A. SU-E-T-581: On the Value of LET as a Radiation Quality Descriptor for RBE. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924943.
Pater, P, Backstrom, G, Enger, S, Seuntjens, J, Naqa, I El, Villegas, F, & Ahnesjo, A. SU-E-T-581: On the Value of LET as a Radiation Quality Descriptor for RBE. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924943.
Pater, P, Backstrom, G, Enger, S, Seuntjens, J, Naqa, I El, Villegas, F, and Ahnesjo, A. Mon . "SU-E-T-581: On the Value of LET as a Radiation Quality Descriptor for RBE". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924943.
@article{osti_22496294,
title = {SU-E-T-581: On the Value of LET as a Radiation Quality Descriptor for RBE},
author = {Pater, P and Backstrom, G and Enger, S and Seuntjens, J and Naqa, I El and Villegas, F and Ahnesjo, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the relationship between linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for protons and light ions, and the corresponding role of LET as a descriptor of radiation quality of hadron therapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) proton and light ion (He, Li, C) tracks with LET < 30 eV nm{sup -1} were generated in an event-by-event mode. They were overlaid on a cell nucleus model containing 6×10{sup 9} nucleotide base pairs using an isotropic irradiation procedure that provides electronic equilibrium. Strand breaks (sbs) were scored in the DNA sugar-phosphate groups and further sub-classified into single or double sbs (ssbs or dsbs). Distributions of ssbs and dsbs for 2 Gy fractions were calculated to estimate RBE for the induction of initial dsbs with reference to {sup 60}Co. Additionally, sbs were classified based on their complexity (i.e. the number of sbs in each cluster). Results: An increase in LET for light ions of the same atomic number or a decrease in atomic number for ions of the same LET resulted in a lower kinetic energy of emitted secondary electrons. The clustering of DNA damage was more pronounced as reflected by the increase in proton RBE from ∼ 1.75 to 4 for LET values of 7 to 28 eV nm{sup -1}. A significant RBE decrease between protons, He, Li and C ions of the same LET was also noticed as function of the atomic number. Significant differences in ssbs and dsbs complexities were also seen for particles with the same LET, potentially supporting a clustering-based radiation quality descriptor. Conclusion: The LET-RBE relationships were simulated for proton and light ions and exhibited expected trends, including different RBEs for particles with the same LET but different atomic numbers. A complexity based radiation quality descriptor may allow better differentiation of RBE between radiation fields of similar LET. We would like to acknowledge support from the Fonds de recherche du Quebec Sante (FRQS), from the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network grant (number 432290) of NSERC, support from NSERC under grants RGPIN 397711-11 and RGPIN-2014-06475 and support from CIHR under grants MOP-114910, MOP-136774 and MOP-102550.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924943},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To compare dosimetric properties and monitor units (MU) of IMRT plans with several VMAT head and neck (H and N) plans. Methods: Seventeen unilateral H and N (UHN) and five bilateral H and N (BHN) patients initially treated with IMRT were replanned with VMAT. Several arc arrangements were studied for each patient: 1)for UHN, two 360° arcs, two 260° arcs, two 210° arcs, two 360° arcs with contralateral avoidance sectors, and 2)for BHN, two 360° arcs, two 360° arcs with bilateral avoidance sectors, two 360° arcs with bilateral avoidance sectors and a third arc limited to the upper neck.more » Optimization constraints were adjusted for each patient and plan. All plans were normalized to achieve the same highest-dose PTV coverage. Percent differences (IMRT-VMAT)/VMAT in MU, dose homogeneity (HI=maximum point dose/prescription dose), and organ-at-risk (OAR) metrics are reported and statistical significance evaluated (p<0.05; paired Student t-test). Results: Average reduction in MU with VMAT was 28% for UHN (p<0.0001) and 63% for BHN (p<0.0001). Average HI for UHN IMRT and 360° arc VMAT plans was 1.08 and for plans with arcs <360° average HI=1.10. Average HI for BHN IMRT was 1.07, for three-arc VMAT 1.08, and for two-arc VMAT 1.11. For UHN, two 210° arcs achieved lower contralateral parotid max (−2.6 Gy, p<0.02) and mean (−1.2 Gy, p=0.06) dose. For BHN two-arc plans, contralateral parotid mean dose increased (3.3 Gy, p<0.04) and larynx max dose increased (2.9 Gy, p<0.02) with no change in larynx mean dose. Conclusion: For UHN, 360degree arc VMAT consistently produced plans dosimetrically comparable to IMRT with the benefit of lower MU. VMAT with arcs <360degrees produced plans inferior to IMRT in dose homogeneity and without significantly improved OAR sparing. For BHN, three-arc plans were dosimetrically comparable to IMRT with lower MU, while two-arc plans were inferior to IMRT in HI and OAR dose. Research supported in part by a Kaye Family Award.« less
  • To use the micronucleus (MN) assay as a biological dosimeter, it is essential that the dose response to different radiation qualities is known. In this paper we present dose-response curves for MN induction by X rays (14, 50 and 350 kVp) and {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays. The dose responses for 14 kVp compared to 50 kVp and for 350 kVp compared to {sup 60}Co were found to differ significantly, whereas no significant difference could be demonstrated between 50 kVp and 350 kVp. Calculated RBE values with respect to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays increase strongly with decreasing dose. The high RBEmore » value (2.7) obtained for 14 kVp X rays in the low-dose region is of importance for radiological protection in clinical practice. A good linear correlation was found between the biological damage expressed by the RBE values for MN induction and the calculated physical parameter {bar L}ET{sub 100,T} expressing the energy deposition pattern in the medium. This correlation points to the fact that secondary phenomena involved in MN formation (repair, coagulation) do not differ greatly for the X-ray qualities used in this work. It can be concluded that MN induction in human lymphocytes can be used as a sensitive biological dosimeter for radiation damage by X rays and {gamma} rays. 26 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a system to rapidly and accurately calculate RBE with the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model for proton therapy data sets and to evaluate its effectiveness in modeling RBE for cell survival experiments performed with the H460 cell line for a range of proton LET. Methods: A system for using the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software with high performance computing was developed. Input for the MCDS software for a range of proton energies in increments of 0.1 MeV was generated and simulated. The output data were then used to determine doseaveraged quantities for the RMF model based on equivalentlymore » binned proton energy spectra. The method was applied to calculate RBE at 50% survival for experimental cell survival data. Experimental data were obtained using a system which allowed for the accumulation of cell survival data at known values of dose-averaged proton LETs at a range of doses. RBE was calculated based directly on a Cs-137 reference experiment and, additionally, according to fitted values of the θ and κ terms of the RMF model. Results: Dose-averaged RMF model quantities were calculated using the HPC system. Compared to experimental RBE determined using a Cs-137 irradiation as a reference, the RBE from the model differed by at most 49%. RBE based on the fitted values of θ and κ differed by at most 18% for the highest LET. Conclusion: A system for rapidly generating data necessary to calculate RBE with the RMF model has been developed. For the H460 cell line, the RMF model could not reproduce the experimentally determined RBE based solely on the photon reference data. Fitting of the θ and κ terms of the RMF model indicates that their values increase for proton LET exceeding approximately 10 keV/µm. NIH Program Project Grant P01CA021239.« less
  • Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed formore » annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.« less
  • Purpose: To test the sensitivity of the quality assurance (QA) tools actively used on a clinical MR-IGRT system for potential delivery errors. Methods: Patient-specific QA procedures have been implemented for a commercially available Cobalt-60 MR-IGRT system. The QA tools utilized were a MR-compatible cylindrical diode-array detector (ArcCHECK) with a custom insert which positions an ionization chamber (Exradin A18) in the middle of the device, as well as an in-house treatment delivery verification program. These tools were tested to investigate their sensitivity to delivery errors. For the ArcCHECK and ion chamber, a baseline was established with a static field irradiation tomore » a known dose. Variations of the baseline were investigated which included rotated gantry, altered field size, directional shifts, and different delivery time. In addition, similar variations were tested with the automated delivery verification program that compared the treatment parameters in the machine delivery logs to the ones in the plan. To test the software, a 3-field conformal plan was generated as the baseline. Results: ArcCHECK noted at least a 13% decrease in passing rate from baseline in the following scenarios: gantry rotation of 1 degree from plan, 5mm change in field size, 2mm lateral shift, and delivery time decrease. Ion chamber measurements remained consistent for these variations except for the 5 second decrease in delivery time scenario which resulted in an 8% difference from baseline. The delivery verification software was able to detect and report the simulated errors such as when the gantry was rotated by 0.6 degrees, the beam weighting was changed by a percent, a single multileaf collimator was moved by 1cm, and the dose was changed from 2 to 1.8Gy. Conclusion: The results show that the current tools used for patient specific QA are capable of detecting small errors in RT delivery with presence of magnetic field.« less