skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-E-T-567: Neutron Dose Equivalent Evaluation for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy with Apertures

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the neutron contamination from the aperture in pencil beam scanning during proton therapy. Methods: A Monte Carlo based proton therapy research platform TOPAS and the UF-series hybrid pediatric phantoms were used to perform this study. First, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment pediatric plans with average spot size of 10 mm at iso-center were created and optimized for three patients with and without apertures. Then, the plans were imported into TOPAS. A scripting method was developed to automatically replace the patient CT with a whole body phantom positioned according to the original plan iso-center. The neutron dose equivalent was calculated using organ specific quality factors for two phantoms resembling a 4- and 14-years old patient. Results: The neutron dose equivalent generated by the apertures in PBS is 4–10% of the total neutron dose equivalent for organs near the target, while roughly 40% for organs far from the target. Compared to the neutron dose equivalent caused by PBS without aperture, the results show that the neutron dose equivalent with aperture is reduced in the organs near the target, and moderately increased for those organs located further from the target. This is due to the reduction of the proton dosemore » around the edge of the CTV, which causes fewer neutrons generated in the patient. Conclusion: Clinically, for pediatric patients, one might consider adding an aperture to get a more conformal treatment plan if the spot size is too large. This work shows the somewhat surprising fact that adding an aperture for beam scanning for facilities with large spot sizes reduces instead of increases a potential neutron background in regions near target. Changran Geng is supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11475087)« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [1]
  1. Massachusetts General Hospotal and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
  2. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496281
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; APERTURES; BEAM POSITION; BEAM SCANNERS; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEUTRON BEAMS; ORGANS; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; PHANTOMS; PROTON BEAMS; QUALITY FACTOR; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Geng, C, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Schuemann, J, Moteabbed, M, and Paganetti, H. SU-E-T-567: Neutron Dose Equivalent Evaluation for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy with Apertures. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924929.
Geng, C, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Schuemann, J, Moteabbed, M, & Paganetti, H. SU-E-T-567: Neutron Dose Equivalent Evaluation for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy with Apertures. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924929.
Geng, C, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Schuemann, J, Moteabbed, M, and Paganetti, H. Mon . "SU-E-T-567: Neutron Dose Equivalent Evaluation for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy with Apertures". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924929.
@article{osti_22496281,
title = {SU-E-T-567: Neutron Dose Equivalent Evaluation for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy with Apertures},
author = {Geng, C and Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing and Schuemann, J and Moteabbed, M and Paganetti, H},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine the neutron contamination from the aperture in pencil beam scanning during proton therapy. Methods: A Monte Carlo based proton therapy research platform TOPAS and the UF-series hybrid pediatric phantoms were used to perform this study. First, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment pediatric plans with average spot size of 10 mm at iso-center were created and optimized for three patients with and without apertures. Then, the plans were imported into TOPAS. A scripting method was developed to automatically replace the patient CT with a whole body phantom positioned according to the original plan iso-center. The neutron dose equivalent was calculated using organ specific quality factors for two phantoms resembling a 4- and 14-years old patient. Results: The neutron dose equivalent generated by the apertures in PBS is 4–10% of the total neutron dose equivalent for organs near the target, while roughly 40% for organs far from the target. Compared to the neutron dose equivalent caused by PBS without aperture, the results show that the neutron dose equivalent with aperture is reduced in the organs near the target, and moderately increased for those organs located further from the target. This is due to the reduction of the proton dose around the edge of the CTV, which causes fewer neutrons generated in the patient. Conclusion: Clinically, for pediatric patients, one might consider adding an aperture to get a more conformal treatment plan if the spot size is too large. This work shows the somewhat surprising fact that adding an aperture for beam scanning for facilities with large spot sizes reduces instead of increases a potential neutron background in regions near target. Changran Geng is supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11475087)},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924929},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Proton radiation therapy can deliver high radiation doses to tumors while sparing normal tissue. However, protons yield secondary neutron and gamma radiation that is difficult to detect, small in comparison to the prescribed dose, and not accounted for in most treatment planning systems. The risk for secondary malignancies after proton therapy may be dependent on the quality of this dose. Consequently, there is interest in characterizing the secondary radiation. Previously, we used the dual ionization chamber method to measure the separate absorbed dose from gamma-rays and neutrons secondary to the proton beam1, relying on characterization of ionization chamber response inmore » the unknown neutron spectrum from Monte Carlo simulation. We developed a procedure to use Shieldwerx activation foils, with neutron activation energies ranging from 0.025 eV to 13.5 MeV, to measure the neutron energy spectrum from double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) protons outside of the treatment volume in a water tank. The activated foils are transferred to a NaI well chamber for gamma-ray spectroscopy and activity measurement. Since PBS treats in layers, the switching time between layers is used to correct for the decay of the activated foils and the relative dose per layer is assumed to be proportional to the neutron fluence per layer. MATLAB code was developed to incorporate the layer delivery and switching time into a calculation of foil activity, which is then used to determine the neutron energy fluence from tabulated foil activation energy thresholds.1. Diffenderfer et. al., Med. Phys., 38(11) 2011.« less
  • Purpose: Deep inspiration breath-hold techniques (DIBH) have been shown to carry significant dosimetric advantages in conventional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of DIBH techniques for post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) using proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Method: Ten PMRT patients, with or without breast implant, underwent two helical CT scans: one with free breathing and the other with deep inspiration breath-hold. A prescription of 50.4 Gy(RBE) to the whole chest wall and lymphatics (axillary, supraclavicular, and intramammary nodes) was considered. PBS plans were generated for each patient’s CT scan using Astroid,more » an in-house treatment planning system, with the institution conventional clinical PMRT parameters; that is, using a single en-face field with a spot size varying from 8 mm to 14 mm as a function of energy. Similar optimization parameters were used in both plans in order to ensure appropriate comparison. Results: Regardless of the technique (free breathing or DIBH), the generated plans were well within clinical acceptability. DIBH allowed for higher target coverage with better sparing of the cardiac structures. The lung doses were also slightly improved. While the use of DIBH techniques might be of interest, it is technically challenging as it would require a fast PBS delivery, as well as the synchronization of the beam delivery with a gating system, both of which are not currently available at the institution. Conclusion: DIBH techniques display some dosimetric advantages over free breathing treatment for PBS PMRT patients, which warrants further investigation. Plans will also be generated with smaller spot sizes (2.5 mm to 5.5 mm and 5 mm to 9 mm), corresponding to new generation machines, in order to further quantify the dosimetric advantages of DIBH as a function of spot size.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3more » mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.« less
  • Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role for proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) technique. However, MC simulation demands high computing power and is limited to few large proton centers that can afford a computer cluster. We study the feasibility of utilizing cloud computing in the MC simulation of PBS beams. Methods: A GATE/GEANT4 based MC simulation software was installed on a commercial cloud computing virtual machine (Linux 64-bits, Amazon EC2). Single spot Integral Depth Dose (IDD) curves and in-air transverse profiles were used to tune the source parameters to simulate an IBA machine. With the use of StarCluster softwaremore » developed at MIT, a Linux cluster with 2–100 nodes can be conveniently launched in the cloud. A proton PBS plan was then exported to the cloud where the MC simulation was run. Results: The simulated PBS plan has a field size of 10×10cm{sup 2}, 20cm range, 10cm modulation, and contains over 10,000 beam spots. EC2 instance type m1.medium was selected considering the CPU/memory requirement and 40 instances were used to form a Linux cluster. To minimize cost, master node was created with on-demand instance and worker nodes were created with spot-instance. The hourly cost for the 40-node cluster was $0.63 and the projected cost for a 100-node cluster was $1.41. Ten million events were simulated to plot PDD and profile, with each job containing 500k events. The simulation completed within 1 hour and an overall statistical uncertainty of < 2% was achieved. Good agreement between MC simulation and measurement was observed. Conclusion: Cloud computing is a cost-effective and easy to maintain platform to run proton PBS MC simulation. When proton MC packages such as GATE and TOPAS are combined with cloud computing, it will greatly facilitate the pursuing of PBS MC studies, especially for newly established proton centers or individual researchers.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the linear energy transfer (LET) distributions between passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton radiation therapy techniques for medulloblastoma patients and study the potential radiobiological implications. Methods: A group of medulloblastoma patients, previously treated with passive scattering (PS) proton craniospinal irradiation followed by prosterior fossa or involved field boost, were selected from the patient database of our institution. Using the beam geometry and planning computed tomography (CT) image sets of the original treatment plans, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment plans were generated for the cranial treatment for each patient, with average beam spot size of 8mm (sigmamore » in air at isocenter). 3-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated by Monte Carlo methods (TOPAS) both for the original passive scattering and new pencil beam scanning treatment plans. LET volume histograms were calculated for the target and OARs and compared for the two delivery methods. Variable RBE weighted dose distributions and volume histograms were also calculated using a variable dose and LET-based model. Results: Better dose conformity was achieved with PBS planning compared to PS, leading to increased dose coverage for the boost target area and decreased average dose to the structures adjacent to it and critical structures outside the whole brain treatment field. LET values for the target were lower for PBS plans. Elevated LET values for OARs close to the boosted target areas were noticed, due to end of range of proton beams falling inside these structures, resulting in higher RBE weighted dose for these structures compared to the clinical RBE value of 1.1. Conclusion: Transitioning from passive scattering to pencil beam scanning proton radiation treatment can be dosimetrically beneficial for medulloblastoma patients. LET–guided treatment planning could contribute to better decision making for these cases, especially for critical structures at close proximity to the boosted target area.« less