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Title: SU-E-T-559: Monte Carlo Simulation of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit Modeling In-Field and Out-Of-Field Doses for Applications in Computational Radiation Dosimetry

Abstract

Purpose: Mean organ doses from structures located in field and outside of field boundaries during radiotherapy treatment must be considered when looking at secondary effects. Treatment planning in patients with 40 years of follow-up does not include 3-D treatment planning images and did not estimate dose to structures out of the direct field. Therefore, it is of interest to correlate actual clinical events with doses received. Methods: Accurate models of radiotherapy machines combined with whole body computational phantoms using Monte Carlo methods allow for dose reconstructions intended for studies on late radiation effects. The Theratron-780 radiotherapy unit and anatomically realistic hybrid computational phantoms are modeled in the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX. The major components of the machine including the source capsule, lead in the unit-head, collimators (fixed/adjustable), and trimmer bars are simulated. The MCNPX transport code is used to compare calculated values in a water phantom with published data from BJR suppl. 25 for in-field doses and experimental data from AAPM Task Group No. 36 for out-of-field doses. Next, the validated cobalt-60 teletherapy model is combined with the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms as a methodology for estimating organ doses. Results: The model of Theratron-780 hasmore » shown to be agree with percentage depth dose data within approximately 1% and for out of field doses the machine is shown to agree within 8.8%. Organ doses are reported for reference hybrid phantoms. Conclusion: Combining the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms along with a validated model of the Theratron-780 allows for organ dose estimates of both in-field and out-of-field organs. By changing field size, position, and adding patient-specific blocking more complicated treatment set-ups can be recreated for patients treated historically, particularly those who lack both 2D/3D image sets.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. J. Crayton Pruitt Family of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  2. Radiation Oncology, UF Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496274
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COBALT 60; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DELAYED RADIATION EFFECTS; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; DOSIMETRY; HYBRIDIZATION; MONTE CARLO METHOD; ORGANS; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Petroccia, H, Bolch, W, Li, Z, and Mendenhall, N. SU-E-T-559: Monte Carlo Simulation of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit Modeling In-Field and Out-Of-Field Doses for Applications in Computational Radiation Dosimetry. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924921.
Petroccia, H, Bolch, W, Li, Z, & Mendenhall, N. SU-E-T-559: Monte Carlo Simulation of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit Modeling In-Field and Out-Of-Field Doses for Applications in Computational Radiation Dosimetry. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924921.
Petroccia, H, Bolch, W, Li, Z, and Mendenhall, N. Mon . "SU-E-T-559: Monte Carlo Simulation of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit Modeling In-Field and Out-Of-Field Doses for Applications in Computational Radiation Dosimetry". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924921.
@article{osti_22496274,
title = {SU-E-T-559: Monte Carlo Simulation of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit Modeling In-Field and Out-Of-Field Doses for Applications in Computational Radiation Dosimetry},
author = {Petroccia, H and Bolch, W and Li, Z and Mendenhall, N},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Mean organ doses from structures located in field and outside of field boundaries during radiotherapy treatment must be considered when looking at secondary effects. Treatment planning in patients with 40 years of follow-up does not include 3-D treatment planning images and did not estimate dose to structures out of the direct field. Therefore, it is of interest to correlate actual clinical events with doses received. Methods: Accurate models of radiotherapy machines combined with whole body computational phantoms using Monte Carlo methods allow for dose reconstructions intended for studies on late radiation effects. The Theratron-780 radiotherapy unit and anatomically realistic hybrid computational phantoms are modeled in the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX. The major components of the machine including the source capsule, lead in the unit-head, collimators (fixed/adjustable), and trimmer bars are simulated. The MCNPX transport code is used to compare calculated values in a water phantom with published data from BJR suppl. 25 for in-field doses and experimental data from AAPM Task Group No. 36 for out-of-field doses. Next, the validated cobalt-60 teletherapy model is combined with the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms as a methodology for estimating organ doses. Results: The model of Theratron-780 has shown to be agree with percentage depth dose data within approximately 1% and for out of field doses the machine is shown to agree within 8.8%. Organ doses are reported for reference hybrid phantoms. Conclusion: Combining the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms along with a validated model of the Theratron-780 allows for organ dose estimates of both in-field and out-of-field organs. By changing field size, position, and adding patient-specific blocking more complicated treatment set-ups can be recreated for patients treated historically, particularly those who lack both 2D/3D image sets.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924921},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Innovations in radiotherapy treatments, such as dynamic IMRT, VMAT, and SBRT/SRS, result in larger proportions of low-dose regions where normal tissues are exposed to low doses levels. Low doses of radiation have been linked to secondary cancers and cardiac toxicities. The AAPM TG Committee No.158 entitled, ‘Measurements and Calculations of Doses outside the Treatment Volume from External-Beam Radiation Therapy’, has been formed to review the dosimetry of non-target and out-of-field exposures using experimental and computational approaches. Studies on historical patients can provide comprehensive information about secondary effects from out-of-field doses when combined with long-term patient follow-up, thus providing significantmore » insight into projecting future outcomes of patients undergoing modern-day treatments. Methods: We present a Monte Carlo model of a Theratron-1000 cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, which historically treated patients at the University of Florida, as a means of determining doses located outside the primary beam. Experimental data for a similar Theratron-1000 was obtained at the University of Wisconsin’s ADCL to benchmark the model for out-of-field dosimetry. An Exradin A12 ion chamber and TLD100 chips were used to measure doses in an extended water phantom to 60 cm outside the primary field at 5 and 10 cm depths. Results: Comparison between simulated and experimental measurements of PDDs and lateral profiles show good agreement for in-field and out-of-field doses. At 10 cm away from the edge of a 6×6, 10×10, and 20×20 cm2 field, relative out-of-field doses were measured in the range of 0.5% to 3% of the dose measured at 5 cm depth along the CAX. Conclusion: Out-of-field doses can be as high as 90 to 180 cGy assuming historical prescription doses of 30 to 60 Gy and should be considered when correlating late effects with normal tissue dose.« less
  • Purpose: Today the majority of radiation therapy treatments are performed at medical electron linear accelerators (linacs). The accelerated electrons are used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. The use of higher electron respectively photon energies has some advantages over lower energies such as the longer dose build-up. However photons with energies higher than ∼7 MeV can additionally to the interaction with bound electrons undergo inelastic reactions with nuclei. These photonuclear reactions lead to the emission of fast neutrons which contaminate the primary photon field. The neutrons might penetrate through the collimators and deliver out-of-field dose to the patient. Furthermore themore » materials inside the linac head as well as the air inside the treatment room get activated which might deliver dose to the medical employees even when the linac is not in operation. A detailed knowledge of these effects is essential for adequate radiation protection of the employees and an optimal patient treatment. Methods: It is a common method to study the radiation fields of such linacs by means of Monte Carlo simulations. For the investigation of the effects caused by photonuclear reactions a typical linac in high energy mode (Varian Clinac 18 MV-X) as well as the surrounding bunker were modelled and simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA which includes extensive nuclear reaction and neutron transport models additional to electron-photon transport as well as capabilities for a detailed study of effective dose distributions and activation yields. Results: Neutron spectra as well as neutron effective dose distributions within the bunker were obtained, reaching up to some mSv/Gy in the patient’s plane. The results are normalized per Gy in the depth dose maximum at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size. Therefore an absolute interpretation is possible. Conclusion: The obtained data gives a better understanding of the photonuclear reaction caused effects.« less
  • Purpose: Organ doses for the Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients treated with cobalt-60 radiation were estimated using an anthropomorphic model and Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: A cobalt-60 treatment unit modeled in the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code was used to produce phase space data. The Monte Carlo simulation was verified with percent depth dose measurement in water at various field sizes. Radiation transport through the lung blocks were modeled by adjusting the weights of phase space data. We imported a precontoured adult female hybrid model and generated a treatment plan. The adjusted phase space data and the human model were imported to themore » XVMC Monte Carlo code for dose calculation. The organ mean doses were estimated and dose volume histograms were plotted. Results: The percent depth dose agreement between measurement and calculation in water phantom was within 2% for all field sizes. The mean organ doses of heart, left breast, right breast, and spleen for the selected case were 44.3, 24.1, 14.6 and 3.4 Gy, respectively with the midline prescription dose of 40.0 Gy. Conclusion: Organ doses were estimated for the patient group whose threedimensional images are not available. This development may open the door to more accurate dose reconstruction and estimates of uncertainties in secondary cancer risk for Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients. This work was partially supported by the intramural research program of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.« less
  • Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric uncertainty due to organ position errors when using height and weight as phantom selection criteria in the UF/NCI Hybrid Phantom Library for the purpose of out-of-field organ dose reconstruction. Methods: Four diagnostic patient CT images were used to create 7-field IMRT plans. For each patient, dose to the liver, right lung, and left lung were calculated using the XVMC Monte Carlo code. These doses were taken to be the ground truth. For each patient, the phantom with the most closely matching height and weight was selected from the body size dependent phantom library. The patientmore » plans were then transferred to the computational phantoms and organ doses were recalculated. Each plan was also run on 4 additional phantoms with reference heights and or weights. Maximum and mean doses for the three organs were computed, and the DVHs were extracted and compared. One sample t-tests were performed to compare the accuracy of the height and weight matched phantoms against the additional phantoms in regards to both maximum and mean dose. Results: For one of the patients, the height and weight matched phantom yielded the most accurate results across all three organs for both maximum and mean doses. For two additional patients, the matched phantom yielded the best match for one organ only. In 13 of the 24 cases, the matched phantom yielded better results than the average of the other four phantoms, though the results were only statistically significant at the .05 level for three cases. Conclusion: Using height and weight matched phantoms does yield better results in regards to out-of-field dosimetry than using average phantoms. Height and weight appear to be moderately good selection criteria, though this selection criteria failed to yield any better results for one patient.« less