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Title: SU-E-T-553: Monte Carlo Calculation of Proton Bragg Peak Displacements in the Presence of Al2O3:C Dosimeters

Abstract

Purpose: The application of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) may be extended to clinical investigations verifying irradiated doses in small animal models. In proton beams, the accurate positioning of the Bragg peak is essential for tumor targeting. The purpose of this study was to estimate the displacement of a pristine Bragg peak when an Al2O3:C nanodot (Landauer, Inc.) is placed on the surface of a water phantom and to evaluate corresponding changes in dose. Methods: Clinical proton pencil beam simulations were carried out with using TOPAS, a Monte Carlo platform layered on top of GEANT4. Point-shaped beams with no energy spread were modeled for energies 100MV, 150MV, 200MV, and 250MV. Dose scoring for 100,000 particle histories was conducted within a water phantom (20cm × 20cm irradiated area, 40cm depth) with its surface placed 214.5cm away from the source. The modeled nanodot had a 4mm radius and 0.2mm thickness. Results: A comparative analysis of Monte Carlo depth dose profiles modeled for these proton pencil beams did not demonstrate an energy dependent in the Bragg peak shift. The shifts in Bragg Peak depth for water phantoms modeled with a nanodot on the phantom surface ranged between 2.7 to 3.2 mm. In allmore » cases, the Bragg Peaks were shifted closer to the irradiation source. The peak dose in phantoms with an OSLD remained unchanged with percent dose differences less than 0.55% when compared to phantom doses without the nanodot. Conclusion: Monte Carlo calculations show that the presence of OSLD nanodots in proton beam therapy will not change the position of a pristine Bragg Peak by more than 3 mm. Although the 3.0 mm shift will not have a detrimental effect in patients receiving proton therapy, this effect may not be negligible in dose verification measurements for mouse models at lower proton beam energies.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496269
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BRAGG CURVE; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; DOSEMETERS; ENERGY DEPENDENCE; IRRADIATION; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PEAKS; PHANTOMS; PROTON BEAMS; QUANTUM DOTS; SIMULATION; WATER

Citation Formats

Young, L, and Yang, F. SU-E-T-553: Monte Carlo Calculation of Proton Bragg Peak Displacements in the Presence of Al2O3:C Dosimeters. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924915.
Young, L, & Yang, F. SU-E-T-553: Monte Carlo Calculation of Proton Bragg Peak Displacements in the Presence of Al2O3:C Dosimeters. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924915.
Young, L, and Yang, F. Mon . "SU-E-T-553: Monte Carlo Calculation of Proton Bragg Peak Displacements in the Presence of Al2O3:C Dosimeters". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924915.
@article{osti_22496269,
title = {SU-E-T-553: Monte Carlo Calculation of Proton Bragg Peak Displacements in the Presence of Al2O3:C Dosimeters},
author = {Young, L and Yang, F},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The application of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) may be extended to clinical investigations verifying irradiated doses in small animal models. In proton beams, the accurate positioning of the Bragg peak is essential for tumor targeting. The purpose of this study was to estimate the displacement of a pristine Bragg peak when an Al2O3:C nanodot (Landauer, Inc.) is placed on the surface of a water phantom and to evaluate corresponding changes in dose. Methods: Clinical proton pencil beam simulations were carried out with using TOPAS, a Monte Carlo platform layered on top of GEANT4. Point-shaped beams with no energy spread were modeled for energies 100MV, 150MV, 200MV, and 250MV. Dose scoring for 100,000 particle histories was conducted within a water phantom (20cm × 20cm irradiated area, 40cm depth) with its surface placed 214.5cm away from the source. The modeled nanodot had a 4mm radius and 0.2mm thickness. Results: A comparative analysis of Monte Carlo depth dose profiles modeled for these proton pencil beams did not demonstrate an energy dependent in the Bragg peak shift. The shifts in Bragg Peak depth for water phantoms modeled with a nanodot on the phantom surface ranged between 2.7 to 3.2 mm. In all cases, the Bragg Peaks were shifted closer to the irradiation source. The peak dose in phantoms with an OSLD remained unchanged with percent dose differences less than 0.55% when compared to phantom doses without the nanodot. Conclusion: Monte Carlo calculations show that the presence of OSLD nanodots in proton beam therapy will not change the position of a pristine Bragg Peak by more than 3 mm. Although the 3.0 mm shift will not have a detrimental effect in patients receiving proton therapy, this effect may not be negligible in dose verification measurements for mouse models at lower proton beam energies.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924915},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Aim of this study was to analyze the modulating, broadening effect on the Bragg Peak due to heterogeneous geometries like multi-wire chambers in the beam path of a particle therapy beam line. The effect was described by a mathematical model which was implemented in the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA via user-routines, in order to reduce the computation time for the simulations. Methods: The depth dose curve of 80 MeV/u C12-ions in a water phantom was calculated using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA (reference curve). The modulating effect on this dose distribution behind eleven mesh-like foils (periodicity ∼80 microns) occurring in amore » typical set of multi-wire and dose chambers was mathematically described by optimizing a normal distribution so that the reverence curve convoluted with this distribution equals the modulated dose curve. This distribution describes a displacement in water and was transferred in a probability distribution of the thickness of the eleven foils using the water equivalent thickness of the foil’s material. From this distribution the distribution of the thickness of one foil was determined inversely. In FLUKA the heterogeneous foils were replaced by homogeneous foils and a user-routine was programmed that varies the thickness of the homogeneous foils for each simulated particle using this distribution. Results: Using the mathematical model and user-routine in FLUKA the broadening effect could be reproduced exactly when replacing the heterogeneous foils by homogeneous ones. The computation time was reduced by 90 percent. Conclusion: In this study the broadening effect on the Bragg Peak due to heterogeneous structures was analyzed, described by a mathematical model and implemented in FLUKA via user-routines. Applying these routines the computing time was reduced by 90 percent. The developed tool can be used for any heterogeneous structure in the dimensions of microns to millimeters, in principle even for organic materials like lung tissue.« less
  • Purpose: The Monte Carlo (MC) method is a gold standard for dose calculation in radiotherapy. However, it is not a priori clear how many particles need to be simulated to achieve a given dose accuracy. Prior error estimate and stopping criterion are not well established for MC. This work aims to fill this gap. Methods: Due to the statistical nature of MC, our approach is based on one-sample t-test. We design the prior error estimate method based on the t-test, and then use this t-test based error estimate for developing a simulation stopping criterion. The three major components are asmore » follows.First, the source particles are randomized in energy, space and angle, so that the dose deposition from a particle to the voxel is independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.).Second, a sample under consideration in the t-test is the mean value of dose deposition to the voxel by sufficiently large number of source particles. Then according to central limit theorem, the sample as the mean value of i.i.d. variables is normally distributed with the expectation equal to the true deposited dose.Third, the t-test is performed with the null hypothesis that the difference between sample expectation (the same as true deposited dose) and on-the-fly calculated mean sample dose from MC is larger than a given error threshold, in addition to which users have the freedom to specify confidence probability and region of interest in the t-test based stopping criterion. Results: The method is validated for proton dose calculation. The difference between the MC Result based on the t-test prior error estimate and the statistical Result by repeating numerous MC simulations is within 1%. Conclusion: The t-test based prior error estimate and stopping criterion are developed for MC and validated for proton dose calculation. Xiang Hong and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000) and the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program (#14PJ1404500)« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the differences in dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) maps calculated in water by means of different strategies found in the literature in proton therapy Monte Carlo simulations and to compare their values with dose-mean lineal energy microdosimetry calculations. Methods: The Geant4 toolkit (version 9.6.2) was used. Dose and LETd maps in water were scored for primary protons with cylindrical voxels defined around the beam axis. Three LETd calculation methods were implemented. First, the LETd values were computed by calculating the unrestricted linear energy transfer (LET) associated to each single step weighted by the energy deposition (including delta-rays)more » along the step. Second, the LETd was obtained for each voxel by computing the LET along all the steps simulated for each proton track within the voxel, weighted by the energy deposition of those steps. Third, the LETd was scored as the quotient between the second momentum of the LET distribution, calculated per proton track, over the first momentum. These calculations were made with various voxel thicknesses (0.2 – 2.0 mm) for a 160 MeV proton beamlet and spread-out Bragg Peaks (SOBP). The dose-mean lineal energy was calculated in a uniformly-irradiated water sphere, 0.005 mm radius. Results: The value of the LETd changed systematically with the voxel thickness due to delta-ray emission and the enlargement of the LET distribution spread, especially at shallow depths. Differences of up to a factor 1.8 were found at the depth of maximum dose, leading to similar differences at the central and distal depths of the SOBPs. The third LETd calculation method gave better agreement with microdosimetry calculations around the Bragg Peak. Conclusion: Significant differences were found between LETd map Monte Carlo calculations due to both the calculation strategy and the voxel thickness used. This could have a significant impact in radiobiologically-optimized proton therapy treatments.« less
  • Purpose: Output dependence on field size for uniform scanning beams, and the accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are not well studied. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dependence of output on field size for uniform scanning beams and compare it among TPS calculation, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Field size dependence was studied using various field sizes between 2.5 cm diameter to 10 cm diameter. The field size factor was studied for a number of proton range and modulation combinations based on output at the center of spread out Bragg peak normalized to amore » 10 cm diameter field. Three methods were used and compared in this study: 1) TPS calculation, 2) ionization chamber measurement, and 3) Monte Carlos simulation. The XiO TPS (Electa, St. Louis) was used to calculate the output factor using a pencil beam algorithm; a pinpoint ionization chamber was used for measurements; and the Fluka code was used for Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The field size factor varied with proton beam parameters, such as range, modulation, and calibration depth, and could decrease over 10% from a 10 cm to 3 cm diameter field for a large range proton beam. The XiO TPS predicted the field size factor relatively well at large field size, but could differ from measurements by 5% or more for small field and large range beams. Monte Carlo simulations predicted the field size factor within 1.5% of measurements. Conclusion: Output factor can vary largely with field size, and needs to be accounted for accurate proton beam delivery. This is especially important for small field beams such as in stereotactic proton therapy, where the field size dependence is large and TPS calculation is inaccurate. Measurements or Monte Carlo simulations are recommended for output determination for such cases.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the shielding wall design to protect patients, staff and member of the general public for secondary neutron using a simply analytic solution, multi-Monte Carlo code MCNPX, ANISN and FLUKA. Methods: An analytical and multi-Monte Carlo method were calculated for proton facility (Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd.) at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The NCRP-144 analytical evaluation methods, which produced conservative estimates on the dose equivalent values for the shielding, were used for analytical evaluations. Then, the radiation transport was simulated with the multi-Monte Carlo code. The neutron dose at evaluation point is got by the value using themore » production of the simulation value and the neutron dose coefficient introduced in ICRP-74. Results: The evaluation points of accelerator control room and control room entrance are mainly influenced by the point of the proton beam loss. So the neutron dose equivalent of accelerator control room for evaluation point is 0.651, 1.530, 0.912, 0.943 mSv/yr and the entrance of cyclotron room is 0.465, 0.790, 0.522, 0.453 mSv/yr with calculation by the method of NCRP-144 formalism, ANISN, FLUKA and MCNP, respectively. The most of Result of MCNPX and FLUKA using the complicated geometry showed smaller values than Result of ANISN. Conclusion: The neutron shielding for a proton therapy facility has been evaluated by the analytic model and multi-Monte Carlo methods. We confirmed that the setting of shielding was located in well accessible area to people when the proton facility is operated.« less