skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-E-T-550: Modulation Index for VMAT

Abstract

Purpose: To present modulation indices (MIs) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: A total of 40 VMAT plans were retrospectively selected. To investigate the delivery accuracy of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates, differences in modulating parameters between plans and log files, and differences between the original plans and the plans reconstructed with the log files were acquired. A modulation index (MIt) was designed by multiplications of the weighted quantifications of MLC speeds, MLC accelerations, gantry accelerations and dose-rate variations. Textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation and entropy were calculated from the fluences of each VMAT plan. To test the performance of suggested MIs, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r) with the plan delivery accuracy were calculated. Conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT (MCSv), leaf travel modulation complexity score (LTMCS) and MI by Li & Xing were calculated, and their correlations were also analyzed in the same way. Results: The r values of contrast (particular displacement distance, d = 1), variance (d = 1), MIt, MCSv, LTMCS and MI by Li&Xing to the local gamma passing rates with 2%/2 mm were 0.547 (p < 0.001), 0.519 (p <more » 0.001), −0.658 (p < 0.001), 0.186 (p = 0.251), 0.312 (p = 0.05) and −0.455 (p = 0.003), respectively. The r values of those to the MLC errors were −0.863, −0.828, 0.917, −0.635, − 0.857 and 0.795, respectively (p < 0.001). For dose-volumetric parameters, MIt showed higher statistically significant correlations than did the conventional modulation indices. Conclusion: The MIt, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) showed good performance to predict the VMAT delivery accuracy showing higher correlations to the results of various types of verification methods for VMAT. This work was in part supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant (no. 490-20140029 and no. 490-20130047) funded by the Korea government.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
  3. Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496266
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; BEAM TRANSPORT; CORRELATIONS; DOSE RATES; MODULATION; RADIOTHERAPY; REPUBLIC OF KOREA

Citation Formats

Park, J, Park, S, Kim, J, Kim, J, Kim, H, Carlson, J, and Ye, S. SU-E-T-550: Modulation Index for VMAT. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924912.
Park, J, Park, S, Kim, J, Kim, J, Kim, H, Carlson, J, & Ye, S. SU-E-T-550: Modulation Index for VMAT. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924912.
Park, J, Park, S, Kim, J, Kim, J, Kim, H, Carlson, J, and Ye, S. Mon . "SU-E-T-550: Modulation Index for VMAT". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924912.
@article{osti_22496266,
title = {SU-E-T-550: Modulation Index for VMAT},
author = {Park, J and Park, S and Kim, J and Kim, J and Kim, H and Carlson, J and Ye, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To present modulation indices (MIs) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: A total of 40 VMAT plans were retrospectively selected. To investigate the delivery accuracy of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates, differences in modulating parameters between plans and log files, and differences between the original plans and the plans reconstructed with the log files were acquired. A modulation index (MIt) was designed by multiplications of the weighted quantifications of MLC speeds, MLC accelerations, gantry accelerations and dose-rate variations. Textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation and entropy were calculated from the fluences of each VMAT plan. To test the performance of suggested MIs, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r) with the plan delivery accuracy were calculated. Conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT (MCSv), leaf travel modulation complexity score (LTMCS) and MI by Li & Xing were calculated, and their correlations were also analyzed in the same way. Results: The r values of contrast (particular displacement distance, d = 1), variance (d = 1), MIt, MCSv, LTMCS and MI by Li&Xing to the local gamma passing rates with 2%/2 mm were 0.547 (p < 0.001), 0.519 (p < 0.001), −0.658 (p < 0.001), 0.186 (p = 0.251), 0.312 (p = 0.05) and −0.455 (p = 0.003), respectively. The r values of those to the MLC errors were −0.863, −0.828, 0.917, −0.635, − 0.857 and 0.795, respectively (p < 0.001). For dose-volumetric parameters, MIt showed higher statistically significant correlations than did the conventional modulation indices. Conclusion: The MIt, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) showed good performance to predict the VMAT delivery accuracy showing higher correlations to the results of various types of verification methods for VMAT. This work was in part supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant (no. 490-20140029 and no. 490-20130047) funded by the Korea government.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924912},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To determine the out of field response of Microstar ii OSLDs as a function of field modulation and distance in VMAT plan delivery. This work has potential application in fetal dose monitoring or measurements on cardiac pacemakers Methods: VMAT plans were created in Eclipse and optimized to varying degrees of modulation. Three plans were chosen to represent low, medium and high degrees of modulation (modulation factors as defined by MU/cGy). Plans were delivered to slabs of solid water with dimensions 60cm length, 30cm width, and 10cm height. For each modulation factor, 2 OSLDs were placed at 1cm depth withmore » out of field distances of 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 and 10cm and the plan delivered isocentrically to a depth of 5cm. This technique was repeated for a Farmer Chamber by incrementing the table by the appropriate distance. The charge readings for the Farmer Chamber were converted to dose and the ratios taken as functions of modulation factors and distances out of field Results: Examination of the results as a function of out of field distance shows a trend of increasing OSLD/Farmer Chamber ratios for all modulation factors. The slopes appear to be roughly equivalent for all modulation factors investigated. Results as a function of modulation showed a downward trend for all out of field distances, with the greatest differences seen at 5cm and 8cm Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the response of OSLD dosimeters change as a function of out of field distance and modulation. The differences seen are within the stated accuracy of the system for the out of field distances and modulations investigated. Additional investigation is warranted to see if the OSLD response changes appreciably with longer out of field distances or wider ranges of modulation.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of Varian DynaLog files to verify VMAT plans delivery and modulation complexity score (MCS) of VMAT. Methods: Delivery accuracy of machine performance was quantified by multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors, gantry angle errors and fluence delivery accuracy for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The relationship between machine performance and plan complexity were also investigated using the modulation complexity score (MCS). Plan and Actual MLC positions, gantry angles and delivered fraction of monitor units were extracted from Varian DynaLog files. These factors were taken from the record and verify systemmore » of MLC control file. Planned and delivered beam data were compared to determine leaf position errors and gantry angle errors. Analysis was also performed on planned and actual fluence maps reconstructed from those of the DynaLog files. This analysis was performed for all treatment fractions of 5 prostate VMAT plans. The analysis of DynaLog files have been carried out by in-house programming in Visual C++. Results: The root mean square of leaf position and gantry angle errors were about 0.12 and 0.15, respectively. The Gamma of planned and actual fluence maps at 3%/3 mm criterion was about 99.21. The gamma of the leaf position errors were not directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Therefore, the gamma of the gantry angle errors were directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Conclusion: This study shows Varian dynalog files for VMAT plan can be diagnosed delivery errors not possible with phantom based quality assurance. Furthermore, the MCS of VMAT plan can evaluate delivery accuracy for patients receiving of VMAT. Machine performance was found to be directly related to plan complexity but this is not the dominant determinant of delivery accuracy.« less
  • Purpose: To improve dose calculation accuracy for highly modulated fields in IMRT and VMAT using an elliptical source model. Methods: For 2 TrueBeam linacs equipped with Millennium and HD MLCs, the source model of 6 and 15 MV beams was optimized with adjustments of the focal spot dimensions in the Varian Eclipse TPS. Starting from the measured focal spot size of 1.75 × 1.75 mm, the y-dimension of the source was varied while the x-dimension was kept constant. In addition, all other modeling parameters such as the extrafocal source and dosimetric leaf gap remained unchanged. The different models were comparedmore » with measured penumbra for jaws and MLC using ion chamber and diode. For 2 IMRT and 2 VMAT cases, the calculated doses were compared with radiochromic film and EPID measurements. Results: A source size of 1.75 × 0.75 mm was found to be optimal for beam modeling. The calculated penumbra (80–20) of a MLCdefined open field was within 0.8 mm compare to measurement for both the inline and crossline profile for various field sizes and depths. The dose gradients in the direction perpendicular to the MLC travel direction was better modeled compared to the source model with a circular focal spot of 1.75 mm for the fields with rigorous MLC modulation. Local differences up to 8% were found in those regions. Conclusion: The conventional source model using a symmetric focal spot tends to overestimate the penumbra perpendicular to the MLC travel direction, resulting in an inaccurate dose calculation especially for fields with complex MLC modulation. This can be improved with an elliptical source model and it can be considered as a standard as IMRT and VMAT treatments are becoming a norm for the clinic.« less
  • Purpose: At our Institute some measured parameters for daily quality assurance (DQA) of dynamic arc therapy plans showed an unexpected behavior, therefore an investigation of the influence of the magnitude of modulation was conducted. Methods: In our clinical practice all DQAs of dynamic arc therapy plans are measured and analyzed prior to treatments using commercial software. For this study these plans were additionally exported to our in-house software written in MATLAB.The developed software extracted the leaf position, gantry angle, cumulative meterset weight of each control point (CP) and the total number of Monitor Units (MU) of each arc. Based onmore » this information we calculated the leaf travel distance, irradiated segment area, number of MUs and dose rate for each CP. These data allowed us to calculate the modulation indexes (MI) of the plans, applying five different definitions of MI. The results were then correlated to the results of our DQA measurements.To validate the software, additional plans of known MIs were created and analyzed. For confirmation, the calculated parameters were compared to the segmented treatment table (STT) coming from the treatment planning system. Results: All calculated CP-parameters matched the STT by 99% or better. For linac 1, the comparison of the MI evaluation and the DQA results showed a slight tendency: 91.3% failed DQA plans had a MI lower than the average value. For this definition we consider that the lower the MI the higher the modulation. The results of the linac 2 present no significant relevance due to the low sample sizes for each DQA software. Conclusion: Available data and given definitions of the modulation index do not bring conclusive results; one cannot find a clear and distinct correlation with the failure of the DQA. The ongoing analysis with an increased sample size might lead to another conclusion.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 inmore » 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered shorter delivery time than 7F-IMRT and 9F-IMRT without compromising the plan quality.« less