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Title: SU-E-T-545: MLC Distance Travelled as a Predictor for Motor Failure

Abstract

Purpose: To study the frequency of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) leaf failures, investigate methods to predict them and reduce linac downtime. Methods: A Varian HD120 MLC was used in our study. The hyperterminal MLC errors logged from 06/2012 to 12/2014 were collected. Along with the hyperterminal errors, the MLC motor changes and all other MLC interventions by the linear accelerator engineer were recorded. The MLC dynalog files were also recorded on a daily basis for each treatment and during linac QA. The dynalog files were analyzed to calculate root mean square errors (RMS) and cumulative MLC travel distance per motor. An in-house MatLab code was used to analyze all dynalog files, record RMS errors and calculate the distance each MLC traveled per day. Results: A total of 269 interventions were recorded over a period of 18 months. Of these, 146 included MLC motor leaf change, 39 T-nut replacements, and 84 MLC cleaning sessions. Leaves close to the middle of each side required the most maintenance. In the A bank, leaves A27 to A40 recorded 73% of all interventions, while the same leaves in the B bank counted for 52% of the interventions. On average, leaves in the middle of the bankmore » had their motors changed approximately every 1500m of travel. Finally, it was found that the number of RMS errors increased prior to an MLC motor change. Conclusion: An MLC dynalog file analysis software was developed that can be used to log daily MLC usage. Our eighteen-month data analysis showed that there is a correlation between the distance an MLC travels, the RMS and the life of the MLC motor. We plan to use this tool to predict MLC motor failures and with proper and timely intervention, reduce the downtime of the linac during clinical hours.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States)
  2. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496261
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; COMPUTER CODES; DATA ANALYSIS; DISTANCE; ERRORS; FAILURES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MOTORS

Citation Formats

Stathakis, S, Defoor, D, Linden, P, Kirby, N, Papanikolaou, N, and Mavroidis, P. SU-E-T-545: MLC Distance Travelled as a Predictor for Motor Failure. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924907.
Stathakis, S, Defoor, D, Linden, P, Kirby, N, Papanikolaou, N, & Mavroidis, P. SU-E-T-545: MLC Distance Travelled as a Predictor for Motor Failure. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924907.
Stathakis, S, Defoor, D, Linden, P, Kirby, N, Papanikolaou, N, and Mavroidis, P. Mon . "SU-E-T-545: MLC Distance Travelled as a Predictor for Motor Failure". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924907.
@article{osti_22496261,
title = {SU-E-T-545: MLC Distance Travelled as a Predictor for Motor Failure},
author = {Stathakis, S and Defoor, D and Linden, P and Kirby, N and Papanikolaou, N and Mavroidis, P},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To study the frequency of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) leaf failures, investigate methods to predict them and reduce linac downtime. Methods: A Varian HD120 MLC was used in our study. The hyperterminal MLC errors logged from 06/2012 to 12/2014 were collected. Along with the hyperterminal errors, the MLC motor changes and all other MLC interventions by the linear accelerator engineer were recorded. The MLC dynalog files were also recorded on a daily basis for each treatment and during linac QA. The dynalog files were analyzed to calculate root mean square errors (RMS) and cumulative MLC travel distance per motor. An in-house MatLab code was used to analyze all dynalog files, record RMS errors and calculate the distance each MLC traveled per day. Results: A total of 269 interventions were recorded over a period of 18 months. Of these, 146 included MLC motor leaf change, 39 T-nut replacements, and 84 MLC cleaning sessions. Leaves close to the middle of each side required the most maintenance. In the A bank, leaves A27 to A40 recorded 73% of all interventions, while the same leaves in the B bank counted for 52% of the interventions. On average, leaves in the middle of the bank had their motors changed approximately every 1500m of travel. Finally, it was found that the number of RMS errors increased prior to an MLC motor change. Conclusion: An MLC dynalog file analysis software was developed that can be used to log daily MLC usage. Our eighteen-month data analysis showed that there is a correlation between the distance an MLC travels, the RMS and the life of the MLC motor. We plan to use this tool to predict MLC motor failures and with proper and timely intervention, reduce the downtime of the linac during clinical hours.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924907},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: The CyberKnife (CK) M6 Series introduced a mulitleaf collimator (MLC) beam for extending its capability to the conventional radiotherapy. This work is to investigate delivery efficiency of this system as compared to a standard Varian linac when treating hepatic lesions. Methods: Nine previously treated patients were divided into three groups with three patients in each. Group one: fractionated radiotherapy; Group two: SBRT-like treatments and Group three: fractionated radiotherapy targeting two PTVs. The clinically used plans were generated with the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). We re-planned these cases using a Mulitplan (MP) TPS for the CK M6 and normalizedmore » to the same PTV dose coverage. CK factors (CF) (defined as modulation scaling factor in this work), number of nodes (NN), number of MLC segments (NS) and beam delivery time (BT) with an estimated image interval of 60 seconds, were used for evaluation of delivery efficiency. Results: Generated plans from the MP and Eclipse TPS demonstrated the similar quality in terms of PTV confomality index, minimum and maximum PTV doses, and doses received by critical structures. Group one: CF ranged from 8.1 to 8.7, NN from 30 to 40, NS from 120 to 155 and BT from 20 to 23 minutes; group two: CF from 4.7 to 8.5, NN from 15 to 19, NS from 82 to 141 and BT from 18 to 24 minutes; and group three: CF from 7.9 to 10, NN from 47 to 49, NS from 110 to 113 and BT from 20 to 22 minutes. Conclusions: Delivery time is longer for the CK M6 than for the Varian linac (7.8 to 13.7 minutes). Further investigation will be necessary to determine if a PTV reduction from the tracking feature will shorten the delivery time without decreasing plan quality.« less
  • Purpose: Using Linac dynamic logs (Dynalogs) we evaluate the impact of a single failing MLC motor on the deliverability of an IMRT plan by assessing the recalculated dose volume histograms (DVHs) taking the delivered MLC positions and beam hold-offs into consideration. Methods: This is a retrospective study based on a deteriorating MLC motor (leaf 36B) which was observed to be failing via Dynalog analysis. To investigate further, Eclipse-importable MLC files were generated from Dynalogs to recalculate the actual delivered dose and to assess the clinical impact through DVHs. All deliveries were performed on a Varian 21EX linear accelerator equipped withmore » Millennium-120 MLC. The analysis of Dynalog files and subsequent conversion to Eclipse-importable MLC files were all performed by in-house programming in Python. Effects on plan DVH are presented in the following section on a particular brain-IMRT plan which was delivered with a failing MLC motor which was then replaced. Results: Global max dose increased by 13.5%, max dose to the brainstem PRV increased by 8.2%, max dose to the optic chiasm increased by 7.6%, max dose to optic nerve increased by 8.8% and the mean dose to the PTV increased by 7.9% when comparing the original plan to the fraction with the failing MLC motor. The reason the dose increased was due to the failure being on the B-bank which is the lagging side on a sliding window delivery, therefore any failures on this side will cause an over-irradiation as the B-bank leaves struggles to keep the window from growing. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that a single failing MLC motor may jeopardize the entire delivery. This may be due to the bad MLC motor drawing too much current causing all MLCs on the same bank to underperform. This hypothesis will be investigated in a future study.« less
  • Purpose: Methods in common use for MLC leaf position QA are limited to measurements relative to an arbitrary reference position. The authors previously presented an EPID-based method for efficiently testing accuracy of leaf position relative to the mechanical isocenter for MLC with backup jaws. The purpose of this work is to extend that method to the general case of MLC without backup jaws. Methods: A pair of collimator walkout images is used to determine the location of the mechanical isocenter relative to the center of one field using a parameter called X-offset. The method allows for shift of the imagermore » panel to cover subsets of MLC leaves within the limited field of view of the imager. For a shifted panel position, an image of three beam strips defined by a subset of MLC leaves allows determination of the position of each leaf relative to the isocenter. The location of the isocenter is determined by applying X-offset to an image of a single rectangular field obtained at that panel position. The method can also be used to test backup jaws instead of MLC leaves. A software tool was developed to efficiently analyze the images. Results: The software tool reports leaf position and deviation from nominal position, and provides visual displays to facilitate rapid qualitative interpretation. Test results using this method agree well with results using the previous method requiring backup jaws. Test results have been successfully used to recalibrate one model MLC (Elekta MLCi2™). Work in progress includes extension of the software tool to other MLC models, and quantification of reproducibility of the measurements. Conclusion: This work successfully demonstrates a method to efficiently and accurately measure MLC leaf position, or backup jaw position, relative to the mechanical isocenter of the collimator.« less
  • Purpose: Elekta Infinity is the one of the latest generation LINAC with unique features. Two Infinity LINACs are recently commissioned at our institution. The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of the machines are presented. Methods: Both Infinity LINACs with Agility MLC (160 leaves with 0.5 cm leaf width) are configured with five electron energies (6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV) and two photon energies (6 and 15 MV). One machine has additional photon energy (10 MV). The commissioning was performed by following the manufacturer's specifications and AAPM TG recommendations. Beam data of both electron and photon beams are measured withmore » scanning ion chambers and linear diode array. Machines are adjusted to have the dosimetrically equivalent characteristics. Results: The commissioning of mechanical and imaging system meets the tolerances by TG recommendations. The PDD{sub 10} of various field sizes for 6 and 15 MV shows < 0.5% difference between two machines. For each electron beams, R{sub 80} matches with < 0.4 mm difference. The symmetry and flatness agree within 0.8% and 0.9% differences for photon beams, respectively. For electron beams, the differences of the symmetry and flatness are within 1.2% and 0.8%, respectively. The mean inline penumbras for 6, 10, and 15 MV are respectively 5.1±0.24, 5.6±0.07, and 5.9±0.10 mm for 10x10 cm at 10 cm depth. The crossline penumbras are larger than inline penumbras by 2.2, 1.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The MLC transmission factor with interleaf leakage is 0.5 % for all photon energies. Conclusion: The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of two Infinity LINACs show good agreements between them. Although the Elekta Infinity has been used in many institutions, the detailed characteristics of the machine have not been reported. This study provides invaluable information to understand the Infinity LINAC and to compare the quality of commissioning data for other LINACs.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effects of MLC modeling after commissioning the Varian TrueBeam LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2. Methods: Stepand-shoot IMRT QAs were investigated when we observed our measured absolute dose results using ion chamber (Capintec PR-05P) were uncharacteristically low; about 4–5% compared to doses calculated by Pinnacle{sup 3} (Phillips, Madison, WI). This problem was predominant for large and highly modulated head and neck (HN) treatments. Intuitively we knew this had to be related to shortcomings in the MLC modeling in Pinnacle. Using film QA we were able to iteratively adjust the MLC parameters. We confirmed results by re-testing fivemore » failed IMRT QA patients; and ion chamber measurements were verified in Quasar anthropomorphic phantom. Results: After commissioning the LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2, the MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X were 2.0%, 1.7% and 2.0%, respectively, and additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies was 0.5%. These parameters were obtained from profiles scanned with an Edge detector (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) during machine commissioning. A Verification testing with radiographic EDR2 film (Kodak, Rochester, NY) measurement was performed by creating a closed MLC leaf pattern and analyzing using RIT software (RIT, Colorado Springs, CO). This reduced MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X to 0.7%, 0.9% and 0.9%, respectively; while increasing additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies to 1.0%. Conclusion: Radiographic film measurements were used to correct MLC transmission values for step and shoot IMRT fields used in Pinnacle version 9.2. After adjusting the MLC parameters to correlate with the film QA, there was still very good agreement between the Pinnacle model and commissioning data. Using the same QA methodology, we were also able to improve the beam models for the Varian C-series linacs, Novalis-Tx, and TrueBeam M-120 linacs.« less