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Title: SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: Many cell irradiation experiments with low-energy laser-driven ions rely on radiochromic films (RCF), because of their dose-rate independent response and superior spatial resolution. RCF dosimetry in low-energy ion beams requires a correction of the LET dependent film response. The relative efficiency (RE), the ratio of photon to proton dose that yields the same film darkening, is a measure for the film’s LET dependence. A direct way of RE determination is RCF irradiation with low-energy mono-energetic protons and hence, well-defined LET. However, RE is usually determined using high energy proton depth dose measurements where RE corrections require knowledge of the average LET in each depth, which can be either track (tLET) or dose (dLET) averaged. The appropriate LET concept has to be applied to allow a proper film response correction. Methods: Radiochromic EBT2 and EBT3 films were irradiated in clinical photon and proton beams. For each depth of the 200 MeV proton depth dose curve, tLET and dLET were calculated by special user routines from the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Additional irradiations with mono-energetic low energy protons (4–20 MeV) serve as reference for the RE determination. Results: The difference of dLET and tLET increases with depth, with the dLET beingmore » almost twice as large as the tLET for the maximum depth. The comparison with mono-energetic measurements shows a good agreement of the RE for the dLET concept, while a considerably steeper drop in RE is observed when applying the tLET. Conclusion: RCF can be used as reference dosimeter for biomedical experiments with low-energy proton beams if appropriate LET corrections are applied. When using depth dose measurements from clinical proton accelerators for these corrections, the concept of dLET has to be applied. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence ‘Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics’ (MAP). This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Garching, DE (Germany)
  2. Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universitaet der Bundeswehr, Neubiberg, DE (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, DE (Germany)
  4. Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Munich, DE (Germany)
  5. Medical Physics Unit CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22496251
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CORRECTIONS; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; DOSE RATES; FILM DOSIMETRY; IRRADIATION; LET; MEV RANGE; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM DOSEMETERS; PHOTONS; PROTON BEAMS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Reinhardt, S, Wuerl, M, Assmann, W, Parodi, K, Greubel, C, Wilkens, J, Hillbrand, M, and Mairani, A. SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924895.
Reinhardt, S, Wuerl, M, Assmann, W, Parodi, K, Greubel, C, Wilkens, J, Hillbrand, M, & Mairani, A. SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924895.
Reinhardt, S, Wuerl, M, Assmann, W, Parodi, K, Greubel, C, Wilkens, J, Hillbrand, M, and Mairani, A. Mon . "SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924895.
@article{osti_22496251,
title = {SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation},
author = {Reinhardt, S and Wuerl, M and Assmann, W and Parodi, K and Greubel, C and Wilkens, J and Hillbrand, M and Mairani, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Many cell irradiation experiments with low-energy laser-driven ions rely on radiochromic films (RCF), because of their dose-rate independent response and superior spatial resolution. RCF dosimetry in low-energy ion beams requires a correction of the LET dependent film response. The relative efficiency (RE), the ratio of photon to proton dose that yields the same film darkening, is a measure for the film’s LET dependence. A direct way of RE determination is RCF irradiation with low-energy mono-energetic protons and hence, well-defined LET. However, RE is usually determined using high energy proton depth dose measurements where RE corrections require knowledge of the average LET in each depth, which can be either track (tLET) or dose (dLET) averaged. The appropriate LET concept has to be applied to allow a proper film response correction. Methods: Radiochromic EBT2 and EBT3 films were irradiated in clinical photon and proton beams. For each depth of the 200 MeV proton depth dose curve, tLET and dLET were calculated by special user routines from the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Additional irradiations with mono-energetic low energy protons (4–20 MeV) serve as reference for the RE determination. Results: The difference of dLET and tLET increases with depth, with the dLET being almost twice as large as the tLET for the maximum depth. The comparison with mono-energetic measurements shows a good agreement of the RE for the dLET concept, while a considerably steeper drop in RE is observed when applying the tLET. Conclusion: RCF can be used as reference dosimeter for biomedical experiments with low-energy proton beams if appropriate LET corrections are applied. When using depth dose measurements from clinical proton accelerators for these corrections, the concept of dLET has to be applied. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence ‘Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics’ (MAP). This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924895},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: The quantification of the relative surface dose enhancement in dependence on the angle of incidence and the atomic number Z of the surface material. Methods: Experiments were performed with slabs made of aluminum, titanium, copper, silver, dental gold and lead. The metal slabs with equal sizes of 1.0×8.0×8.8mm{sup 3} were embedded in an Octavius 4D phantom (PTW Freiburg, Germany). Radiochromic EBT3 films were used to measure the surface dose for angles of incidence ranging from 0° to 90°. The setup with the metals slabs at the isocenter was irradiated with acceleration voltages of 6MV and 10MV. Water reference measurementsmore » were taken under equal conditions. Results: The surface dose enhancement is highest for angles of incidence below 30° and drops significantly for higher. The surface dose enhancement produced by lead and dental gold at 6MV showed a peak of 65%. At 90°, the surface dose enhancement dropped to 15% for both materials. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 32%, 22% and 12% at 0°, respectively. At an angle of incidence of 80°, the values dropped to 22%, 18%, 12% und 6%. The values for 10MV were very similar. Lead and dental gold showed peaks of 65% und 60%. Their values dropped to 18% at an angle of 90°. The surface dose enhancements for silver, copper, titanium and aluminum were 45%, 30%, 20% and 8% at 0°. At 80° the values dropped to 30%, 20%, 12% and 5%. A dependence of the magnitude of the surface dose enhancement on the atomic number of the surface material can be seen, which is in consistence with literature. Conclusion: The results show that the surface dose enhancements near implant materials with high Z-values should be taken into consideration in radio therapy, even when the angle of incidence is flat.« less
  • Purpose: There have been several reports of enhanced cell-killing and tumor regression when tumor cells and mouse tumors were loaded with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) prior to proton irradiation. While particle-induced xray emission (PIXE), Auger electrons, secondary electrons, free radicals, and biological effects have been suggested as potential mechanisms responsible for the observed GNP-mediated dose enhancement/radiosensitization, there is a lack of quantitative analysis regarding the contribution from each mechanism. Here, we report our experimental effort to quantify some of these effects. Methods: 5-cm-long cylindrical plastic vials were filled with 1.8 mL of either water or water mixed with cylindrical GNPs atmore » the same gold concentration (0.3 mg Au/g) as used in previous animal studies. A piece of EBT2 radiochromic film (30-µm active-layer sandwiched between 80/175-µm outer-layers) was inserted along the long axis of each vial and used to measure dose enhancement due to PIXE from GNPs. Vials were placed at center-of-modulation (COM) and 3-cm up-/down-stream from COM and irradiated with 5 different doses (2–10 Gy) using 10-cm-SOBP 160-MeV protons. After irradiation, films were cleaned and read to determine the delivered dose. A vial containing spherical GNPs (20 mg Au/g) was also irradiated, and gamma-rays from activation products were measured using a cadmium-telluride (CdTe) detector. Results: Film measurements showed no significant dose enhancement beyond the experimental uncertainty (∼2%). There was a detectable activation product from GNPs, but it appeared to contribute to dose enhancement minimally (<0.01%). Conclusion: Considering the composition of EBT2 film, it can be inferred that gold characteristic x-rays from PIXE and their secondary electrons make insignificant contribution to dose enhancement. The current investigation also suggests negligible dose enhancement due to activation products. Thus, previously-reported GNP-mediated proton dose enhancement/radiosensitization needs to be attributed to one or more of the other mechanisms listed earlier. Supported in part by NIH/NCI grant R01CA155446;This investigation was supported in part by NIH/NCI grant R01CA155446.« less
  • Purpose: Use the ratio of the two high temperature peaks (HTR) in TLD 700 glow curves to investigate spatial dependence of the linear energy transfer (LET) in proton beams. Studies show that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends upon the physical dose as well as its spatial distribution. Although proton therapy uses a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, studies suggest that the RBE increases in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) due to the increased LET. Methods: Glow curve studies in TLD 700 show that the 280 C temperature peak is more sensitive to LET radiationmore » than the 210 C temperature peak. Therefore, the areas under the individual temperature peaks for TLDs irradiated in a proton beam normalized to the peak ratio for 6 MV photons are used to determine the HTR to obtain information on its LET. TLD 700 chips with dimensions 0.31×0.31×0.038 cc are irradiated with 90 MeV protons at varying depths in a specially designed blue wax phantom to investigate LET spatial dependence. Results: Five TLDs were placed at five different depths of the percent depth dose curve (PDD) of range 16.2 cm: center of the SOPB and approximately at the 99% distal edge, 90%, 75% and 25% of the PDD, respectively. HTR was 1.3 at the center of the SOBP and varied from 2.2 to 3.9 which can be related to an LET variation from 0.5 to 18 KeV/μ via calibration with radiation beams of varying LET. Conclusion: HTR data show a spatially invariant LET slightly greater than the 6 MV radiations in the SOBP, but a rapidly increasing LET at the end of the proton range. These results indicate a spatial variation in RBE with potential treatment consequences when selecting treatment margins to minimize the uncertainties in proton RBE.« less
  • Purpose: We investigated the effect of the EBT3 GafChromicTM film model absorbed dose energy response when used for percent depth dose (PDD) measurements in low-energy photon beams. Methods: We measured PDDs in water from a Xoft 50 kVp source using EBT3 film, and compared them to PDD measurements acquired with a PTW-TN34013 parallel-plate ionization chamber. For the x-ray source, we simulated spectra using the EGSnrc (BEAMnrc) Monte Carlo code, and calculated Half Value Layer (HVL) at different distances from the source in water. Pieces of EBT3 film were irradiated in air and calibration curves were created in terms of air-kermamore » in air ((Kair)air) for different beam qualities. Pieces of EBT3 film were positioned at distances of 2–6 cm from the Xoft source in a water phantom using a custom-made holder, and irradiated at the same time. As scatter is incorporated in the measured film signal in water, measured (Kair)wat was subsequently converted into absorbed dose to water by the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients following the AAPM TG-61 dosimetry protocol. Results: Our results show that film calibration curves obtained at beam qualities near the effective energy of the Xoft 50 kVp source in water lead to variation in absorbed dose energy dependence of the response of around 3%. However, if the calibration curve was established at MV beam quality, the error in absorbed dose could be as large as 15%. We observed agreement within 1% between PDD measurements using EBT3 film model (using a calibration curve obtained at 80 kVp, HVL=2.18 mm Al, Eeff=29.5 keV) and the parallel-plate ionization chamber. Conclusion: Accurate dose measurements using radiochromic films at low photon energies require that the radiochromic film dosimetry system be calibrated at corresponding low energies, as large absorbed dose errors are expected for calibrations performed at MV beam qualities.« less
  • Purpose: To estimate the three dimensional dose distributions in a polymer gel and a radiochromic gel by comparing with the virtual water phantom exposed to proton beams by applying Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: The polymer gel dosimeter is the compositeness material of gelatin, methacrylic acid, hydroquinone, tetrakis, and distilled water. The radiochromic gel is PRESAGE product. The densities of polymer and radiochromic gel were 1.040 and 1.0005 g/cm3, respectively. The shape of water phantom was a hexahedron with the size of 13 × 13 × 15 cm3. The proton beam energies of 72 and 116 MeV were used in themore » simulation. Proton beam was directed to the top of the phantom with Z-axis and the shape of beam was quadrangle with 10 × 10 cm2 dimension. The Percent depth dose and the dose distribution were evaluated for estimating the dose distribution of proton particle in two gel dosimeters, and compared with the virtual water phantom. Results: The Bragg-peak for proton particles in two gel dosimeters was similar to the virtual water phantom. Bragg-peak regions of polymer gel, radiochromic gel, and virtual water phantom were represented in the identical region (4.3 cm) for 72 MeV proton beam. For 116 MeV proton beam, the Bragg-peak regions of polymer gel, radiochromic gel, and virtual water phantom were represented in 9.9, 9.9 and 9.7 cm, respectively. The dose distribution of proton particles in polymer gel, radiochromic gel, and virtual water phantom was approximately identical in the case of 72 and 116 MeV energies. The errors for the simulation were under 10%. Conclusion: This work indicates the evaluation of three dimensional dose distributions by exposing proton particles to polymer and radiochromic gel dosimeter by comparing with the water phantom. The polymer gel and the radiochromic gel dosimeter show similar dose distributions for the proton beams.« less