skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Structure and photoluminescence properties of carbon nanotip-vertical graphene nanohybrids

Abstract

We report on the effective enhancement and tuning of photoluminescence (PL) by combining vertical graphene nanoflakes (VGs) and carbon nanotips (CNTPs). The VGs are grown on the vertical CNTPs by hot filament chemical vapor deposition in the methane environment, where the CNTPs are synthesized on silicon substrates by CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The results of field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate that the VGs can be grown on the CNTP and silicon substrate surfaces with the orientation perpendicular to the surfaces of CNTPs and silicon substrates. The PL properties of VG, CNTP, and CNTP-VG structures are studied using a 325 nm line of He-Cd laser as the excitation source. The PL results indicate that the PL of VGs is enhanced by the CNTPs due to the increasing density of PL emitters, while the PL properties of the nanohybrid system can be tuned. Furthermore, the potential applications of CNTP-VG structures in optoelectronic devices are analyzed. These results contribute to the design of functional graphene-based materials and the development of next-generation optoelectronic devices.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [2]; ;  [5]
  1. College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd., Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054 (China)
  2. (Australia)
  3. Division of Technical Support, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 10091 (China)
  4. Institute for Future Environments and School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia)
  5. Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494896
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 119; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2016 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; EXCITATION; FIELD EMISSION; FILAMENTS; GRAPHENE; HYDROGEN; METHANE; OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SUBSTRATES; SURFACES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TUNING; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Wang, B. B., Institute for Future Environments and School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4000, Zhu, K., Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@qut.edu.au, Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P. O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070, Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Shao, R. W., and Zheng, K.. Structure and photoluminescence properties of carbon nanotip-vertical graphene nanohybrids. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4939645.
Wang, B. B., Institute for Future Environments and School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4000, Zhu, K., Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@qut.edu.au, Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P. O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070, Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Shao, R. W., & Zheng, K.. Structure and photoluminescence properties of carbon nanotip-vertical graphene nanohybrids. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4939645.
Wang, B. B., Institute for Future Environments and School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4000, Zhu, K., Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@qut.edu.au, Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P. O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070, Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Shao, R. W., and Zheng, K.. Thu . "Structure and photoluminescence properties of carbon nanotip-vertical graphene nanohybrids". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4939645.
@article{osti_22494896,
title = {Structure and photoluminescence properties of carbon nanotip-vertical graphene nanohybrids},
author = {Wang, B. B. and Institute for Future Environments and School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 and Zhu, K. and Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@qut.edu.au and Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P. O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 and Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 and Shao, R. W. and Zheng, K.},
abstractNote = {We report on the effective enhancement and tuning of photoluminescence (PL) by combining vertical graphene nanoflakes (VGs) and carbon nanotips (CNTPs). The VGs are grown on the vertical CNTPs by hot filament chemical vapor deposition in the methane environment, where the CNTPs are synthesized on silicon substrates by CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The results of field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate that the VGs can be grown on the CNTP and silicon substrate surfaces with the orientation perpendicular to the surfaces of CNTPs and silicon substrates. The PL properties of VG, CNTP, and CNTP-VG structures are studied using a 325 nm line of He-Cd laser as the excitation source. The PL results indicate that the PL of VGs is enhanced by the CNTPs due to the increasing density of PL emitters, while the PL properties of the nanohybrid system can be tuned. Furthermore, the potential applications of CNTP-VG structures in optoelectronic devices are analyzed. These results contribute to the design of functional graphene-based materials and the development of next-generation optoelectronic devices.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4939645},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 119,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 14 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Thu Jan 14 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}
  • Highlights: • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with a small diameter are uniformly anchored on RGO surface. • A strong interfacial bonding was formed between ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and RGO. • The minimum RL of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/RGO nanohybrids is −29.3 dB at 16.7 GHz and 1.6 mm. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/RGO nanohybrids show great promise as a microwave absorption material. - Abstract: The nanohybrids composed of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have been synthesized by a facile one-step hydrothermal strategy. The morphology and structure of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/RGO nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-raymore » diffraction and Raman spectra. RGO content was also determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The results confirm the formation of nanohybrids with a content of 20.4 wt% RGO and extensive interfaces between small-diameter ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and RGO sheets. The magnetic properties and electromagnetic parameters of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/RGO nanohybrids were measured and the microwave absorption properties were investigated. ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/RGO nanohybrids exhibit the advantages of thin matching thickness and strong absorption at high frequency bands. It is demonstrated that ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/RGO nanohybrids can be a powerful candidate in the field of microwave absorption.« less
  • Graphene oxide (GO) was prepared by oxidation of graphite flakes by a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and KMnO{sub 4} based on Marcano's method. Two different masterbatches containing GO (33.3%) and polyamide-6 (PA6) (66.7%) were prepared both via solvent casting in formic acid and by melt mixing in a mini-extruder (Haake). The two masterbatches were then used to prepare PA6-based nanocomposites with a content of 2% in GO. For comparison, a nanocomposite by direct mixing of PA6 and GO (2%) and PA6/graphite nanocomposites were prepared, too. The oxidation of graphite into GO was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD),more » Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. All these techniques demonstrated the effectiveness of the graphite modification, since the results put into evidence that, after the acid treatment, interlayer distance, oxygen content and defects increased. SEM micrographs carried out on the nanocomposites, showed GO layers totally surrounded by polyamide-6, this feature is likely due to the strong interaction between the hydrophilic moieties located both on GO and on PA6. On the contrary, no interactions were observed when graphite was used as filler. Mechanical characterization, carried out by tensile and dynamic-mechanical tests, marked an improvement of the mechanical properties observed. Photoluminescence and EPR measurements were carried out onto nanoparticles and nanocomposites to study the nature of the interactions and to assess the possibility to use this class of materials as semiconductors or optical sensors.« less
  • Graphene has been discovered to have two effects on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures, which were formed by covering monolayer graphene sheet on the multilayer ordered GeSi QDs sample surfaces. At the excitation of 488 nm laser line, the hybrid structure had a reduced PL intensity, while at the excitation of 325 nm, it had an enhanced PL intensity. The attenuation in PL intensity can be attributed to the transferring of electrons from the conducting band of GeSi QDs to the graphene sheet. The electron transfer mechanism was confirmed by the time resolved PL measurements. Formore » the PL enhancement, a mechanism called surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) enhanced absorption mechanism is proposed, in which the excitation of SPP in the graphene is suggested. Due to the resonant excitation of SPP by incident light, the absorption of incident light is much enhanced at the surface region, thus leading to more exciton generation and a PL enhancement in the region. The results may be helpful to provide us a way to improve optical properties of low dimensional surface structures.« less
  • Three-dimensional topography of microscopic ion fluxes in the reactive hydrocarbon-based plasma-aided nanofabrication of ordered arrays of vertically aligned single-crystalline carbon nanotip microemitter structures is simulated by using a Monte Carlo technique. The individual ion trajectories are computed by integrating the ion equations of motion in the electrostatic field created by a biased nanostructured substrate. It is shown that the ion flux focusing onto carbon nanotips is more efficient under the conditions of low potential drop U{sub s} across the near-substrate plasma sheath. Under low-U{sub s} conditions, the ion current density onto the surface of individual nanotips is higher for higher-aspect-ratiomore » nanotips and can exceed the mean ion current density onto the entire nanopattern in up to approximately five times. This effect becomes less pronounced with increasing the substrate bias, with the mean relative enhancement of the ion current density {xi}{sub i} not exceeding {approx}1.7. The value of {xi}{sub i} is higher in denser plasmas and behaves differently with the electron temperature T{sub e} depending on the substrate bias. When the substrate bias is low, {xi}{sub i} decreases with T{sub e}, with the opposite tendency under higher-U{sub s} conditions. The results are relevant to the plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of ordered large-area nanopatterns of vertically aligned carbon nanotips, nanofibers, and nanopyramidal microemitter structures for flat-panel display applications.« less
  • Carbon nanotip arrays were grown from silicon substrates via direct current magnetron sputtering at room temperature (RT). The simple carbon nanotip arrays/n-Si (C/Si) heterojunctions were used to detect ethanol gas at RT. The results show that the C/Si junctions have high ethanol gas sensitivity, rapid response, and high recovery speed at RT. Upon exposure to ethanol gas (0.64 g/l) at RT, the resistance of the junction decreases by 35% at a given positive voltage of 8 V. Moreover, the interface capacitance of the junction at 5 kHz can increase by about 40% rapidly when exposed to ethanol gas. The phenomenamore » should be attributed to the change in the Fermi level of the carbon film caused by adsorbing electrons from ethanol molecules. The study shows that the C/Si junctions have potential application as ethanol gas sensors.« less