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Title: Photonic mesophases from cut rod rotators

Abstract

The photonic band properties of random rotator mesophases are calculated using supercell methods applied to cut rods on a hexagonal lattice. Inspired by the thermodynamic mesophase for anisotropic building blocks, we vary the shape factor of cut fraction for the randomly oriented basis. We find large, stable bandgaps with high gap isotropy in the inverted and direct structures as a function of cut fraction, dielectric contrast, and filling fraction. Bandgap sizes up to 34.5% are maximized at high dielectric contrast for rods separated in a matrix. The bandgaps open at dielectric contrasts as low as 2.0 for the transverse magnetic polarization and 2.25 for the transverse electric polarization. Additionally, the type of scattering that promotes the bandgap is correlated with the effect of disorder on bandgap size. Slow light properties are investigated in waveguide geometry and slowdown factors up to 5 × 10{sup 4} are found.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)
  2. Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494882
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 119; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2016 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANISOTROPY; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; GEOMETRY; HEXAGONAL LATTICES; ISOTROPY; LIQUID CRYSTALS; POLARIZATION; RANDOMNESS; SCATTERING; SHAPE; SLOWING-DOWN; WAVEGUIDES

Citation Formats

Stelson, Angela C., Liddell Watson, Chekesha M., E-mail: cml66@cornell.edu, and Avendano, Carlos. Photonic mesophases from cut rod rotators. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4939778.
Stelson, Angela C., Liddell Watson, Chekesha M., E-mail: cml66@cornell.edu, & Avendano, Carlos. Photonic mesophases from cut rod rotators. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4939778.
Stelson, Angela C., Liddell Watson, Chekesha M., E-mail: cml66@cornell.edu, and Avendano, Carlos. 2016. "Photonic mesophases from cut rod rotators". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4939778.
@article{osti_22494882,
title = {Photonic mesophases from cut rod rotators},
author = {Stelson, Angela C. and Liddell Watson, Chekesha M., E-mail: cml66@cornell.edu and Avendano, Carlos},
abstractNote = {The photonic band properties of random rotator mesophases are calculated using supercell methods applied to cut rods on a hexagonal lattice. Inspired by the thermodynamic mesophase for anisotropic building blocks, we vary the shape factor of cut fraction for the randomly oriented basis. We find large, stable bandgaps with high gap isotropy in the inverted and direct structures as a function of cut fraction, dielectric contrast, and filling fraction. Bandgap sizes up to 34.5% are maximized at high dielectric contrast for rods separated in a matrix. The bandgaps open at dielectric contrasts as low as 2.0 for the transverse magnetic polarization and 2.25 for the transverse electric polarization. Additionally, the type of scattering that promotes the bandgap is correlated with the effect of disorder on bandgap size. Slow light properties are investigated in waveguide geometry and slowdown factors up to 5 × 10{sup 4} are found.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4939778},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 119,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 1
}
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