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Title: Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope

Abstract

We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 314-5, Shimokanzo, Iwata City, Shizuoka-Pref. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494400
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1696; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: XRM 2014: 12. international conference on X-ray microscopy, Melbourne (Australia), 26-31 Oct 2014; Other Information: (c) 2016 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ELECTRON SCANNING; ELECTRONS; EV RANGE 100-1000; FOCUSING; IMAGES; KEV RANGE 01-10; MICROSCOPES; RESOLUTION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SOFT X RADIATION; SURFACES

Citation Formats

Matsumura, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomokzau.matsumura@etd.hpk.co.jp, Hirano, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.hirano@etd.hpk.co.jp, and Suyama, Motohiro, E-mail: suyama@etd.hpk.co.jp. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4937532.
Matsumura, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomokzau.matsumura@etd.hpk.co.jp, Hirano, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.hirano@etd.hpk.co.jp, & Suyama, Motohiro, E-mail: suyama@etd.hpk.co.jp. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4937532.
Matsumura, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomokzau.matsumura@etd.hpk.co.jp, Hirano, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.hirano@etd.hpk.co.jp, and Suyama, Motohiro, E-mail: suyama@etd.hpk.co.jp. 2016. "Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4937532.
@article{osti_22494400,
title = {Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope},
author = {Matsumura, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomokzau.matsumura@etd.hpk.co.jp and Hirano, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.hirano@etd.hpk.co.jp and Suyama, Motohiro, E-mail: suyama@etd.hpk.co.jp},
abstractNote = {We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4937532},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1696,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 1
}
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