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Title: SU-E-J-145: Validation of An Analytical Model for in Vivo Range Verification Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation in Proton Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: Predicted PET images on the basis of analytical filtering approach for proton range verification has been successful developed and validated using FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes and phantom measurements. The purpose of the study is to validate the effectiveness of analytical filtering model for proton range verification on GATE/GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation codes. Methods: In this study, we performed two experiments for validation of predicted β+-isotope by the analytical model with GATE/GEANT4 simulations. The first experiments to evaluate the accuracy of predicting β+-yields as a function of irradiated proton energies. In second experiment, we simulate homogeneous phantoms of different materials irradiated by a mono-energetic pencil-like proton beam. The results of filtered β+-yields distributions by the analytical model is compared with those of MC simulated β+-yields in proximal and distal fall-off ranges. Results: The results investigate the distribution between filtered β+-yields and MC simulated β+-yields distribution in different conditions. First, we found that the analytical filtering can be applied over the whole range of the therapeutic energies. Second, the range difference between filtered β+-yields and MC simulated β+-yields at the distal fall-off region are within 1.5mm for all materials used. The findings validated the usefulness of analytical filtering model onmore » range verification of proton therapy on GATE Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, there is a larger discrepancy between filtered prediction and MC simulated β+-yields using GATE code, especially in proximal region. This discrepancy might Result from the absence of wellestablished theoretical models for predicting the nuclear interactions. Conclusion: Despite the fact that large discrepancies of the distributions between MC-simulated and predicted β+-yields were observed, the study prove the effectiveness of analytical filtering model for proton range verification using GATE Monte Carlo simulation.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Chang Gung University, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494156
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; IMAGES; IN VIVO; IRRADIATION; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHANTOMS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY; VERIFICATION

Citation Formats

Lee, C, Lin, H, Chao, T, Hsiao, I, and Chuang, K. SU-E-J-145: Validation of An Analytical Model for in Vivo Range Verification Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation in Proton Therapy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924230.
Lee, C, Lin, H, Chao, T, Hsiao, I, & Chuang, K. SU-E-J-145: Validation of An Analytical Model for in Vivo Range Verification Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation in Proton Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924230.
Lee, C, Lin, H, Chao, T, Hsiao, I, and Chuang, K. Mon . "SU-E-J-145: Validation of An Analytical Model for in Vivo Range Verification Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation in Proton Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924230.
@article{osti_22494156,
title = {SU-E-J-145: Validation of An Analytical Model for in Vivo Range Verification Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation in Proton Therapy},
author = {Lee, C and Lin, H and Chao, T and Hsiao, I and Chuang, K},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Predicted PET images on the basis of analytical filtering approach for proton range verification has been successful developed and validated using FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes and phantom measurements. The purpose of the study is to validate the effectiveness of analytical filtering model for proton range verification on GATE/GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation codes. Methods: In this study, we performed two experiments for validation of predicted β+-isotope by the analytical model with GATE/GEANT4 simulations. The first experiments to evaluate the accuracy of predicting β+-yields as a function of irradiated proton energies. In second experiment, we simulate homogeneous phantoms of different materials irradiated by a mono-energetic pencil-like proton beam. The results of filtered β+-yields distributions by the analytical model is compared with those of MC simulated β+-yields in proximal and distal fall-off ranges. Results: The results investigate the distribution between filtered β+-yields and MC simulated β+-yields distribution in different conditions. First, we found that the analytical filtering can be applied over the whole range of the therapeutic energies. Second, the range difference between filtered β+-yields and MC simulated β+-yields at the distal fall-off region are within 1.5mm for all materials used. The findings validated the usefulness of analytical filtering model on range verification of proton therapy on GATE Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, there is a larger discrepancy between filtered prediction and MC simulated β+-yields using GATE code, especially in proximal region. This discrepancy might Result from the absence of wellestablished theoretical models for predicting the nuclear interactions. Conclusion: Despite the fact that large discrepancies of the distributions between MC-simulated and predicted β+-yields were observed, the study prove the effectiveness of analytical filtering model for proton range verification using GATE Monte Carlo simulation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924230},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: With the aim of reducing acute esophageal radiation toxicity in pediatric patients receiving craniospinal irradiation (CSI), we investigated the implementation of an in-vivo, adaptive proton therapy range verification methodology. Simulation experiments and in-phantom measurements were conducted to validate the range verification technique for this clinical application. Methods: A silicon diode array system has been developed and experimentally tested in phantom for passively scattered proton beam range verification for a prostate treatment case by correlating properties of the detector signal to the water equivalent path length (WEPL). We propose to extend the methodology to verify range distal to the vertebralmore » body for pediatric CSI cases by placing this small volume dosimeter in the esophagus of the anesthetized patient immediately prior to treatment. A set of calibration measurements was performed to establish a time signal to WEPL fit for a “scout” beam in a solid water phantom. Measurements are compared against Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 using the Tool for Particle Simulation (TOPAS). Results: Measurements with the diode array in a spread out Bragg peak of 14 cm modulation width and 15 cm range (177 MeV passively scattered beam) in solid water were successfully validated against proton fluence rate simulations in TOPAS. The resulting calibration curve allows for a sensitivity analysis of detector system response with dose rate in simulation and with individual diode position through simulation on patient CT data. Conclusion: Feasibility has been shown for the application of this range verification methodology to pediatric CSI. An in-vivo measurement to determine the WEPL to the inner surface of the esophagus will allow for personalized adjustment of the treatment plan to ensure sparing of the esophagus while confirming target coverage. A Toltz acknowledges partial support by the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network grant of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (Grant number: 432290)« less
  • Purpose: To study the feasibility of intra-fraction proton beam-range verification with PET imaging. Methods: Two phantoms homogeneous cylindrical PMMA phantoms (290 mm axial length, 38 mm and 200 mm diameter respectively) were studied using PET imaging: a small phantom using a mouse-sized PET (61 mm diameter field of view (FOV)) and a larger phantom using a human brain-sized PET (300 mm FOV). Monte Carlo (MC) simulations (MCNPX and GATE) were used to simulate 179.2 MeV proton pencil beams irradiating the two phantoms and be imaged by the two PET systems. A total of 50 simulations were conducted to generate 50more » positron activity distributions and correspondingly 50 measured activity-ranges. The accuracy and precision of these activity-ranges were calculated under different conditions (including count statistics and other factors, such as crystal cross-section). Separate from the MC simulations, an activity distribution measured from a simulated PET image was modeled as a noiseless positron activity distribution corrupted by Poisson counting noise. The results from these two approaches were compared to assess the impact of count statistics on the accuracy and precision of activity-range calculations. Results: MC Simulations show that the accuracy and precision of an activity-range are dominated by the number (N) of coincidence events of the reconstructed image. They are improved in a manner that is inversely proportional to 1/sqrt(N), which can be understood from the statistical modeling. MC simulations also indicate that the coincidence events acquired within the first 60 seconds with 10{sup 9} protons (small phantom) and 10{sup 10} protons (large phantom) are sufficient to achieve both sub-millimeter accuracy and precision. Conclusion: Under the current MC simulation conditions, the initial study indicates that the accuracy and precision of beam-range verification are dominated by count statistics, and intra-fraction PET image-based beam-range verification is feasible. This work was supported by a research award RP120326 from Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.« less
  • Purpose: To construct a dose monitoring system based on an endorectal balloon coupled to thin scintillating fibers to study the dose delivered to the rectum during prostate cancer proton therapy Methods: The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit version 9.6p02 was used to simulate prostate cancer proton therapy treatments of an endorectal balloon (for immobilization of a 2.9 cm diameter prostate gland) and a set of 34 scintillating fibers symmetrically placed around the balloon and perpendicular to the proton beam direction (for dosimetry measurements) Results: A linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered was observed within <2%, a property thatmore » makes them good candidates for real time dosimetry. Results obtained show that the closest fiber recorded about 1/3 of the dose to the target with a 1/r{sup 2} decrease in the dose distribution as one goes toward the frontal and distal top fibers. Very low dose was recorded by the bottom fibers (about 45 times comparatively), which is a clear indication that the overall volume of the rectal wall that is exposed to a higher dose is relatively minimized. Further analysis indicated a simple scaling relationship between the dose to the prostate and the dose to the top fibers (a linear fit gave a slope of −0.07±0.07 MeV per treatment Gy) Conclusion: Thin (1 mm × 1 mm × 100 cm) long scintillating fibers were found to be ideal for real time in-vivo dose measurement to the rectum for prostate cancer proton therapy. The linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered makes them good candidates of dosimeters. With thorough calibration and the ability to define a good correlation between the dose to the target and the dose to the fibers, such dosimeters can be used for real time dose verification to the target.« less
  • Purpose: The PTCH is preparing the ocular proton beam nozzle for clinical use. Currently commissioning measurements are being performed using films, diodes and ionization chambers. In parallel, a Monte Carlo model of the beam line was created for integration into the automated Monte Carlo treatment plan computation system, MC{sup 2}. This work aims to compare Monte Carlo predictions to measured proton doses in order to validate the Monte Carlo model. Methods: A complete model of the double scattering ocular beam line has been created and is capable of simulating proton beams with a comprehensive set of beam modifying devices, includingmore » eleven different range modulator wheels. Simulations of doses in water were scored and compare to ion chamber measurements of depth doses, lateral dose profiles extracted from half beam block exposures of films, and diode measurements of lateral penumbrae at various depths. Results: All comparison resulted in an average relative entrance dose difference of less than 3% and peak dose difference of less than 2%. All range differences were smaller than 0.2 mm. The differences in the lateral beam profiles were smaller than 0.2 mm, and the differences in the penumbrae were all smaller than 0.4%. Conclusion: All available data shows excellent agreement of simulations and measurements. More measurements will have to be performed in order to completely and systematically validate the model. Besides simulating and measuring PDDs and lateral profiles of all remaining range modulator wheels, the absolute dosimetry factors in terms of number of source protons per monitor unit have to be determined.« less
  • Purpose: In proton therapy, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) – compared with conventional photon therapy – is routinely set to 1.1. However, experimental in vitro studies indicate evidence for the variability of the RBE. To clarify the impact on patient treatment, investigation of the RBE in a preclinical case study should be performed. Methods: The Monte Carlo software TOPAS was used to simulate the radiation field of an irradiation setup at the experimental beamline of the proton therapy facility (OncoRay) in Dresden, Germany. Simulations were performed on cone beam CT-data (CBCT) of a xenogeneous mouse with an orthotopic lung carcinomamore » obtained by an in-house developed small animal image-guided radiotherapy device. A homogeneous physical fraction dose of 1.8Gy was prescribed for the contoured tumor volume. Simulated dose and linear energy transfer distributions were used to estimate RBE values in the mouse based on an RBE model by Wedenberg et al. To characterize radiation sensitivity of normal and tumor tissue, α/β-ratios were taken from the literature for NB1RGB (10.1Gy) and human squamous lung cancer (6.2Gy) cell lines, respectively. Results: Good dose coverage of the target volume was achieved with a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The contra-lateral lung was completely spared from receiving radiation. An increase in RBE towards the distal end of the SOBP from 1.07 to 1.35 and from 1.05 to 1.3 was observed when considering normal tissue and tumor, respectively, with the highest RBE values located distal to the target volume. Conclusion: Modeled RBE values simulated on CBCT for experimental preclinical proton therapy varied with tissue type and depth in a mouse and differed therefore from a constant value of 1.1. Further translational work will include, first, conducting preclinical experiments and, second, analogous RBE studies in patients using experimentally verified simulation settings for our clinically used patient-specific beam conforming technique.« less