skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-E-J-111: Finite Element-Based Deformable Image Registration of Pleural Cavity for Photodynamic Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: The pleural volumes will deform during surgery portion of the pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) of lung cancer when the pleural cavity is opened. This impact the delivered dose when using highly conformal treatment techniques. In this study, a finite element-based (FEM) deformable image registration is used to quantify the anatomical variation between the contours for the pleural cavities obtained in the operating room and those determined from pre-surgery computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: An infrared camera-based navigation system (NDI) is used during PDT to track the anatomical changes and contour the lung and chest cavity. A series of CTs of the lungs, in the same patient, are also acquired before the surgery. The structure contour of lung and the CTs are processed and contoured in Matlab and MeshLab. Then, the contours are imported into COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0, where the FEM-based deformable image registration is obtained using the deformed mesh - moving mesh (ALE) model. The NDI acquired lung contour is considered as the reference contour, and the CT contour is used as the target one, which will be deformed. Results: The reconstructed three-dimensional contours from both NDI and CT can be converted to COMSOL so that a three-dimensional ALEmore » model can be developed. The contours can be registered using COMSOL ALE moving mesh model, which takes into account the deformation along x, y and z-axes. The deformed contour has good matches to the reference contour after the dynamic matching process. The resulting 3D deformation map can be used to obtain the locations of other critical anatomic structures, e.g., heart, during surgery. Conclusion: Deformable image registration can fuse images acquired by different modalities. It provides insights into the development of phenomenon and variation in normal anatomical structures over time. The initial assessments of three-dimensional registration show good agreement.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494126
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CHEST; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; HEART; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; RADIATION DOSES; SURGERY; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Penjweini, R, and Zhu, T. SU-E-J-111: Finite Element-Based Deformable Image Registration of Pleural Cavity for Photodynamic Therapy. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924198.
Penjweini, R, & Zhu, T. SU-E-J-111: Finite Element-Based Deformable Image Registration of Pleural Cavity for Photodynamic Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924198.
Penjweini, R, and Zhu, T. Mon . "SU-E-J-111: Finite Element-Based Deformable Image Registration of Pleural Cavity for Photodynamic Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924198.
@article{osti_22494126,
title = {SU-E-J-111: Finite Element-Based Deformable Image Registration of Pleural Cavity for Photodynamic Therapy},
author = {Penjweini, R and Zhu, T},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The pleural volumes will deform during surgery portion of the pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) of lung cancer when the pleural cavity is opened. This impact the delivered dose when using highly conformal treatment techniques. In this study, a finite element-based (FEM) deformable image registration is used to quantify the anatomical variation between the contours for the pleural cavities obtained in the operating room and those determined from pre-surgery computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: An infrared camera-based navigation system (NDI) is used during PDT to track the anatomical changes and contour the lung and chest cavity. A series of CTs of the lungs, in the same patient, are also acquired before the surgery. The structure contour of lung and the CTs are processed and contoured in Matlab and MeshLab. Then, the contours are imported into COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0, where the FEM-based deformable image registration is obtained using the deformed mesh - moving mesh (ALE) model. The NDI acquired lung contour is considered as the reference contour, and the CT contour is used as the target one, which will be deformed. Results: The reconstructed three-dimensional contours from both NDI and CT can be converted to COMSOL so that a three-dimensional ALE model can be developed. The contours can be registered using COMSOL ALE moving mesh model, which takes into account the deformation along x, y and z-axes. The deformed contour has good matches to the reference contour after the dynamic matching process. The resulting 3D deformation map can be used to obtain the locations of other critical anatomic structures, e.g., heart, during surgery. Conclusion: Deformable image registration can fuse images acquired by different modalities. It provides insights into the development of phenomenon and variation in normal anatomical structures over time. The initial assessments of three-dimensional registration show good agreement.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924198},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purposes: To systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during head-and-neck (H'N) radiation therapy using a GPU-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods: Eleven H'N IMRT patients comprised the subject population. The daily megavoltage CT and weekly kVCT scans were acquired for each patient. The pre-treatment CTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CT through an in-house GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure was computed to account for non-rigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant for the PTVs and critical structures was used to quantify anatomical volume changes. Dose accumulation was performed tomore » determine the actual delivered dose and dose accumulation. A landmark tool was developed to determine the uncertainty in the dose distribution due to registration error. Results: Dramatic interfraction anatomic changes leading to dosimetric variations were observed. During the treatment courses of 6–7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, the center-of-mass displacement of the two parotids varied in the range of 0.9–8.8mm. Mean doses were within 5% and 3% of the planned mean doses for all PTVs and CTVs, respectively. The cumulative minimum/mean/EUD doses were lower than the planned doses by 18%, 2%, and 7%, respectively for the PTV1. The ratio of the averaged cumulative cord maximum doses to the plan was 1.06±0.15. The cumulative mean doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left-parotid (p=0.03) and right-parotid gland (p=0.006). The computation time was nearly real-time (∼ 45 seconds) for registering each pre-treatment CT to the planning CT and dose accumulation with registration accuracy (for kVCT) at sub-voxel level (<1.5mm). Conclusions: Real-time assessment of anatomic and dosimetric variations is feasible using the GPU-based DIR framework. Clinical implementation of this technology may enable timely plan adaption and potentially lead to improved outcome.« less
  • Purpose: To estimate the accumulated dose to targets and organs at risk (OAR) for head and neck (H'N) radiotherapy using 3 deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Five H'N patients, who had daily CBCTs taken during the course of treatment, were retrospectively studied. All plans had 5 mm CTV-to-PTV expansions. To overcome the small field of view (FOV) limitations and HU uncertainties of CBCTs, CT images were deformably registered using a parameter-optimized B-spline DIR algorithm (Elastix, elastix.isi.uu.nl) and resampled onto each CBCT with a 4 cm uniform FOV expansion. The dose of the day was calculated on these resampled CTmore » images. Calculated daily dose matrices were warped and accumulated to the planning CT using 3 DIR algorithms; SmartAdapt (Eclipse/Varian), Velocity (Velocity Medical Solutions), and Elastix. Dosimetric indices for targets and OARs were determined from the DVHs and compared with corresponding planned quantities. Results: The cumulative dose deviation was less than 2%, on average, for PTVs from the corresponding plan dose, for all algorithms/patients. However, the parotids show as much as a 37% deviation from the intended dose, possibly due to significant patient weight loss during the first 3 weeks of treatment (15.3 lbs in this case). The mean(±SD) cumulative dose deviations of the 5 patients estimated using the 3 algorithms (SmartAdapt, Velocity, and Elastix) were (0.8±0.9%, 0.5±0.9%, 0.6±1.3%) for PTVs, (1.6±1.9%, 1.4±2.0%, 1.7±1.9%) for GTVs, (10.4±12.1%, 10.7±10.6%, 6.5±10.1%) for parotid glands, and (4.5±4.6%, 3.4±5.7%, 3.9±5.7%) for mucosa, respectively. The differences among the three DIR algorithms in the estimated cumulative mean doses (1SD (in Gy)) were: 0.1 for PTVs, 0.1 for GTVs, 1.9 for parotid glands, and 0.4 for mucosa. Conclusion: Results of this study are suggestive that more frequent plan adaptation for organs, such as the parotid glands, might be beneficial during the course of H'N RT. This study was supported in part by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.« less
  • Purpose: To quantitatively compare and evaluate the dosimetry difference between breast brachytherapy protocols with different fractionation using deformable image registration. Methods: The accumulative dose distribution for multiple breast brachytherapy patients using four different applicators: Contura, Mammosite, Savi, and interstitial catheters, under two treatment protocols: 340cGy by 10 fractions in 5 days and 825cGy by 3 fractions in 2days has been reconstructed using a two stage deformable image registration approach. For all patients, daily CT was acquired with the same slice thickness (2.5mm). In the first stage, the daily CT images were rigidly registered to the initial planning CT using themore » registration module in Eclipse (Varian) to align the applicators. In the second stage, the tissues surrounding the applicator in the rigidly registered daily CT image were non-rigidly registered to the initial CT using a combination of image force and the local constraint that enforce zero normal motion on the surface of the applicator, using a software developed in house. We calculated the dose distribution in the daily CTs and deformed them using the final registration to convert into the image domain of the initial planning CT. The accumulative dose distributions were evaluated by dosimetry parameters including D90, V150 and V200, as well as DVH. Results: Dose reconstruction results showed that the two day treatment has a significant dosimetry improvement over the five day protocols. An average daily drop of D90 at 1.3% of the prescription dose has been observed on multiple brachytherapy patients. There is no significant difference on V150 and V200 between those two protocols. Conclusion: Brachytherapy with higher fractional dose and less fractions has an improved performance on being conformal to the dose distribution in the initial plan. Elongated brachytherapy treatments need to consider the dose uncertainty caused by the temporal changes of the soft tissue.« less
  • Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used after surgical resection to treat the microscopic disease for malignant pleural mesothelioma and to increase survival rates. Although accurate light delivery is imperative to PDT efficacy, the deformation of the pleural volume during the surgery impacts the delivered light dose. To facilitate treatment planning, we use a finite-element-based (FEM) deformable image registration to quantify the anatomical variation of lung and heart volumes between CT pre-(or post-) surgery and surface contours obtained during PDT using an infrared camera-based navigation system (NDI). Methods: NDI is used during PDT to obtain the information of the cumulative lightmore » fluence on every cavity surface point that is being treated. A wand, comprised of a modified endotrachial tube filled with Intralipid and an optical fiber inside the tube, is used to deliver the light during PDT. The position of the treatment is tracked using an attachment with nine reflective passive markers that are seen by the NDI system. Then, the position points are plotted as three-dimensional volume of the pleural cavity using Matlab and Meshlab. A series of computed tomography (CT) scans of the lungs and heart, in the same patient, are also acquired before and after the surgery. The NDI and CT contours are imported into COMSOL Multiphysics, where the FEM-based deformable image registration is obtained. The NDI and CT contours acquired during and post-PDT are considered as the reference, and the Pre-PDT CT contours are used as the target, which will be deformed. Results: Anatomical variation of the lung and heart volumes, taken at different times from different imaging devices, was determined by using our model. The resulting three-dimensional deformation map along x, y and z-axes was obtained. Conclusion: Our model fuses images acquired by different modalities and provides insights into the variation in anatomical structures over time.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a CBCT HU correction method using a patient specific HU to mass density conversion curve based on a novel image registration and organ mapping method for head-and-neck radiation therapy. Methods: There are three steps to generate a patient specific CBCT HU to mass density conversion curve. First, we developed a novel robust image registration method based on sparseness analysis to register the planning CT (PCT) and the CBCT. Second, a novel organ mapping method was developed to transfer the organs at risk (OAR) contours from the PCT to the CBCT and corresponding mean HU values of eachmore » OAR were measured in both the PCT and CBCT volumes. Third, a set of PCT and CBCT HU to mass density conversion curves were created based on the mean HU values of OARs and the corresponding mass density of the OAR in the PCT. Then, we compared our proposed conversion curve with the traditional Catphan phantom based CBCT HU to mass density calibration curve. Both curves were input into the treatment planning system (TPS) for dose calculation. Last, the PTV and OAR doses, DVH and dose distributions of CBCT plans are compared to the original treatment plan. Results: One head-and-neck cases which contained a pair of PCT and CBCT was used. The dose differences between the PCT and CBCT plans using the proposed method are −1.33% for the mean PTV, 0.06% for PTV D95%, and −0.56% for the left neck. The dose differences between plans of PCT and CBCT corrected using the CATPhan based method are −4.39% for mean PTV, 4.07% for PTV D95%, and −2.01% for the left neck. Conclusion: The proposed CBCT HU correction method achieves better agreement with the original treatment plan compared to the traditional CATPhan based calibration method.« less