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Title: SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

Abstract

Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed targetmore » size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over a range of clinical circumstances. These findings highlight the need for careful target localization and accurate identification of compression thickness and target offset. Prof. Rivard is a shareholder of Advanced Radiation Therapy, LLC, the manufacturer of the AccuBoost noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy system examined herein. None of the other authors have any conflicts-of-interest for this work.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3];  [4]
  1. Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)
  2. SUNY Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY (United States)
  3. Univeristy Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States)
  4. Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494113
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; BENCHMARKS; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTER CODES; DEFORMATION; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; SKIN; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Rivard, MJ, Ghadyani, HR, Bastien, AD, Lutz, NN, and Hepel, JT. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924183.
Rivard, MJ, Ghadyani, HR, Bastien, AD, Lutz, NN, & Hepel, JT. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924183.
Rivard, MJ, Ghadyani, HR, Bastien, AD, Lutz, NN, and Hepel, JT. Mon . "SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924183.
@article{osti_22494113,
title = {SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method},
author = {Rivard, MJ and Ghadyani, HR and Bastien, AD and Lutz, NN and Hepel, JT},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over a range of clinical circumstances. These findings highlight the need for careful target localization and accurate identification of compression thickness and target offset. Prof. Rivard is a shareholder of Advanced Radiation Therapy, LLC, the manufacturer of the AccuBoost noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy system examined herein. None of the other authors have any conflicts-of-interest for this work.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924183},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: the accuboost is the most modern method of breast brachytherapy that is a boost method in compressed tissue by a mammography unit. the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue, as compressed tissue is important that should be characterized. Methods: In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast in mammography loading, the displacement of breast tissue and the dose distribution in compressed and uncompressed tissue, are investigated. Dosimetry was performed by two dosimeter methods of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 code and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For Monte Carlo simulations, the dose values in cubical lattice were calculated using tally F6. The displacementmore » of the breast elements was simulated by Finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software, from which the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model is constructed from MR images of 6 volunteers. Experimental dosimetery was performed by placing the thermoluminescence dosimeters into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom and on the proximal edge of compression plates to the chest. Results: The results indicate that using the cone applicators would deliver more than 95% of dose to the depth of 5 to 17mm, while round applicator will increase the skin dose. Nodal displacement, in presence of gravity and 60N forces, i.e. in mammography compression, was determined with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in orthogonal orientation. Finally, in comparison of the acquired from thermoluminescence dosimeters with MCNP5, they are consistent with each other in breast phantom and in chest's skin with average different percentage of 13.7±5.7 and 7.7±2.3, respectively. Conclusion: The major advantage of this kind of dosimetry is the ability of 3D dose calculation by FE Modeling. Finally, polyvinyl alcohol is a reliable material as a breast tissue equivalent dosimetric phantom that provides the ability of TLD dosimetry for validation.« less
  • Purpose: To perform dose modeling of a noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy (NIIGBB) for comparison to electrons and 3DCRT. Methods and Materials: The novel technology used in this study is a mammography-based, noninvasive breast brachytherapy system whereby the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct {sup 192}Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. To date, three-dimensional dose modeling of NIIGBB has not been possible because of the limitations of conventional treatment planning systems (TPS) to model variable tissue deformation associated with breast compression. In this study, the TPS was adapted such that the NIIGBB dose distributions were modeledmore » as a virtual point source. This dose calculation technique was applied to CT data from 8 patients imaged with the breast compressed between parallel plates in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral axes. A dose-volume comparison was performed to simulated electron boost and 3DCRT APBI. Results: The NIIGBB PTV was significantly reduced as compared with both electrons and 3DCRT. Electron boost plans had a lower D{sub min} than the NIIGBB technique but higher V{sub 100}, D{sub 90}, and D{sub 50}. With regard to PTV coverage for APBI, the only significant differences were minimally higher D{sub 90}, D{sub 100}, V{sub 80}, and V{sub 90}, with 3DCRT and D{sub max} with NIIGBB. The NIIGBB technique, as compared with electrons and 3D-CRT, achieved a lower maximum dose to skin (60% and 10%, respectively) and chest wall/lung (70-90%). Conclusions: NIIGBB achieves a PTV that is smaller than electron beam and 3DCRT techniques. This results in significant normal tissue sparing while maintaining dosimetric benchmarks to the target tissue.« less
  • Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/more » TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify and delineate seeds and calcifications.« less
  • Purpose: In brachytherapy, structures surrounding the target have the potential to move between treatments and receive unknown dose. Deformable image registration could overcome challenges through dose accumulation. This study uses two possible deformable dose summation techniques and compares the results to point dose summation currently performed in clinic. Methods: Data for ten patients treated with a Syed template was imported into the MIM software (Cleveland, OH). The deformable registration was applied to structures by masking other image data to a single intensity. The registration flow consisted of the following steps: 1) mask CTs so that each of the structures-of-interest hadmore » one unique intensity; 2) perform applicator — based rigid registration; 3) Perform deformable registration; 4) Refine registration by changing local alignments manually; 5) Repeat steps 1 to 3 until desired structure adequately deformed; 5) Transfer each deformed contours to the first CT. The deformed structure accuracy was determined by a dice similarity coefficient (DSC) comparison with the first fraction. Two dose summation techniques were investigated: a deformation and recalculation on the structure; and a dose deformation and accumulation method. Point doses were used as a comparison value. Results: The Syed deformations have DSC ranging from 0.53 to 0.97 and 0.75 and 0.95 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. For the bladder, contour deformation addition ranged from −34.8% to 0.98% and dose deformation accumulation ranged from −35% to 29.3% difference from clinical calculations. For the rectum, contour deformation addition ranged from −5.2% to 16.9% and the dose deformation accumulation ranged from −29.1% to 15.3% change. Conclusion: Deforming dose for summation leads to different volumetric doses than when dose is recalculated on deformed structures, raising concerns about the accuracy of the deformed dose. DSC alone cannot be used to establish the accuracy of a deformation for brachy dose summation purpose.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e.,more » averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems.« less