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Title: SU-E-J-86: Functional Conformal Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with CT-Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the functional planning using CT-pulmonary ventilation imaging for conformal SBRT. Methods: The CT-pulmonary ventilation image was generated using the Jacobian metric in the in-house program with the NiftyReg software package. Using the ventilation image, the normal lung was split into three lung regions for functionality (high, moderate and low). The anatomical plan (AP) and functional plan (FP) were made for ten lung SBRT patients. For the AP, the beam angles were optimized with the dose-volume constraints for the normal lung sparing and the PTV coverage. For the FP, the gantry angles were also optimized with the additional constraint for high functional lung. The MLC aperture shapes were adjusted to the PTV with the additional 5 mm margin. The dosimetric parameters for PTV, the functional volumes, spinal cord and so on were compared in both plans. Results: Compared to the AP, the FP showed better dose sparing for high- and moderate-functional lungs with similar PTV coverage while not taking care of the low functional lung (High:−12.9±9.26% Moderate: −2.0±7.09%, Low: +4.1±12.2%). For the other normal organs, the FP and AP showed similar dose sparing in the eight patients. However, the FP showed that the maximum doses for spinal cordmore » were increased with the significant increment of 16.4Gy and 21.0Gy in other two patients, respectively. Because the beam direction optimizer chose the unexpected directions passing through the spinal cord. Conclusion: Even the functional conformal SBRT can selectively reduce high- and moderatefunctional lung while keeping the PTV coverage. However, it would be careful that the optimizer would choose unexpected beam angles and the dose sparing for the other normal organs can be worse. Therefore, the planner needs to control the dose-volume constraints and also limit the beam angles in order to achieve the expected dose sparing and coverage.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo (Japan)
  2. National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494104
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SPINAL CORD

Citation Formats

Kurosawa, T, Moriya, S, Sato, M, and Tachibana, H. SU-E-J-86: Functional Conformal Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with CT-Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924173.
Kurosawa, T, Moriya, S, Sato, M, & Tachibana, H. SU-E-J-86: Functional Conformal Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with CT-Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924173.
Kurosawa, T, Moriya, S, Sato, M, and Tachibana, H. Mon . "SU-E-J-86: Functional Conformal Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with CT-Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924173.
@article{osti_22494104,
title = {SU-E-J-86: Functional Conformal Planning for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with CT-Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging},
author = {Kurosawa, T and Moriya, S and Sato, M and Tachibana, H},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the functional planning using CT-pulmonary ventilation imaging for conformal SBRT. Methods: The CT-pulmonary ventilation image was generated using the Jacobian metric in the in-house program with the NiftyReg software package. Using the ventilation image, the normal lung was split into three lung regions for functionality (high, moderate and low). The anatomical plan (AP) and functional plan (FP) were made for ten lung SBRT patients. For the AP, the beam angles were optimized with the dose-volume constraints for the normal lung sparing and the PTV coverage. For the FP, the gantry angles were also optimized with the additional constraint for high functional lung. The MLC aperture shapes were adjusted to the PTV with the additional 5 mm margin. The dosimetric parameters for PTV, the functional volumes, spinal cord and so on were compared in both plans. Results: Compared to the AP, the FP showed better dose sparing for high- and moderate-functional lungs with similar PTV coverage while not taking care of the low functional lung (High:−12.9±9.26% Moderate: −2.0±7.09%, Low: +4.1±12.2%). For the other normal organs, the FP and AP showed similar dose sparing in the eight patients. However, the FP showed that the maximum doses for spinal cord were increased with the significant increment of 16.4Gy and 21.0Gy in other two patients, respectively. Because the beam direction optimizer chose the unexpected directions passing through the spinal cord. Conclusion: Even the functional conformal SBRT can selectively reduce high- and moderatefunctional lung while keeping the PTV coverage. However, it would be careful that the optimizer would choose unexpected beam angles and the dose sparing for the other normal organs can be worse. Therefore, the planner needs to control the dose-volume constraints and also limit the beam angles in order to achieve the expected dose sparing and coverage.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924173},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the utility of {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography (PET) scans guidance for SBRT dose painting in patients with prostate cancer and its impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods: Twenty seven patients with localized prostate cancer who had {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT scan prior to treatment were included. A pair of nested intraprostatic dominant lesion (IDL) contours (IDL{sub suv60%} and IDL{sub suv70%}) were generated for each patient based on 60% and 70% of maximum prostate uptake on the {sup 18}F-choline PET images. GTV{sub reg} was delineated on prostate according to the glandmore » boundary seen on CT images. The PTVs (PTV{sub suv60%} and PTV{sub suv70%}) were defined as respective IDLs with a 3-mm margin posteriorly and 5 mm in all other dimensions. Two 5-fraction SBRT plans using VMAT technique along with 10 MV FFF beams, plan{sub 36Gy} and plan{sub 50–55Gy}, were generated for each patient. All plans included a dose of 36.25 Gy prescribed to PTV{sub reg}. The Plan{sub 50–55Gy} also included a simultaneous boost dose of 50 Gy and 55 Gy prescribed to the PTV{sub suv60%} and PTV{sub suv70%}, respectively. The utility of {sup 18}F-Choline PET-guided SBRT dose escalation was evaluated by its ability to achieve the prescription dose objectives while adhering to organ-at-risk (OAR) dose constraints. The TCP and NTCP calculated by radiological models were also compared between two plans for each patient. Results: In all 54 SBRT plans generated, the planning objectives and dose constraints were met without exception. Plan{sub 50–55Gy} had a significantly higher dose in PTV{sub suv60%} and PTV{sub suv70%} than those in Plan{sub 36Gy} (p < 0.05), respectively, while still maintaining a safe OAR sparing profile. In addition, plan{sub 50–55Gy} had significantly higher TCP than plan{sub 36Gy}. Conclusion: Using VMAT with FFF beams to incorporate a simultaneous {sup 18}F-choline PET-guided radiation boost dose up to 55 Gy into a SBRT plan is technically feasible. This work was supported in part by Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs Prostate Cancer Research Program grant PC04130, National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute grant R41CA110121, and the UNLV Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.« less
  • Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using themore » CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)« less
  • Purpose: SBRT allows the delivery of high dose radiation treatments to localized tumors while minimizing dose to surrounding tissues. Due to the large doses delivered, accurate contouring of organs at risk is essential. In this study, differences between the true spinal cord as seen using MRI and CT myelogram (CTM) have been assessed in patients with spinal metastases treated using SBRT. Methods: Ten patients were identified that have both a CTM and a MRI. Using rigid registration tools, the MRI was fused to the CTM. The thecal sac and true cord were contoured using each imaging modality. Images were exportedmore » and analyzed for similarity by computing the Dice similarity coefficient and the modified Hausdorff distance (greatest distance from a point in one set to the closest point in the other set). Results: The Dice coefficient was calculated for the thecal sac (0.81 ±0.06) and true cord (0.63 ±0.13). These two measures are correlated; however, some points show a low true cord overlap despite a high overlap for the thecal sac. The Hausdorff distance for structure comparisons was also calculated. For thecal sac structures, the average value, 1.6mm (±1.1), indicates good overlap. For true cord comparison, the average value, 0.3mm (±0.16), indicates very good overlap. The minimum Hausdorff distance between the true cord and thecal sac was on average 1.6mm (±0.9) Conclusion: The true cord position as seen in MRI and CTM is fairly constant, although care should be taken as large differences can be seen in individual patients. Avoidning the true cord in spine SBRT is critical, so the ability to visualize the true cord before performing SBRT to the vertebrae is essential. Here, CT myelogram appears an excellent, robust option, that can be obtained the day of treatment planning and is unaffected by uncertainties in image fusion.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images usingmore » deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: −5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.« less
  • Purpose: Four-dimensional-computed-tomography(4D-CT) imaging for target-volume delineation and cone-beam-tomography(CBCT) for treatment localization are widely utilized in lung-SABR.Aim of this study was to perform a quantitative-assessment and inter-comparison of Internal-targetvolumes( ITV) drawn on various phases of breathing-cycle 4D-CT-scans, Maximum-intensity-projection(MIP), average-intensity-projection(AIP)and static CT-scans of lung-motion-phantom to simulate lung-SABR patient geometry. We also analyzed and compared the ITVs drawn on freebreathing- CBCT. Materials and Methods: 4D-CT-scans were acquired on Philips big-bore 16slice CT and Bellows-respiratory monitoring-system using retrospective phase-binning method. Each respiratory cycle divided into 10-phases. Quasar-Phantom with lung-inserts and 3cm-diameter nylonball to simulate tumor and was placed on respiratory-motion-platform for 4D-CT and CBCT-acquisition.more » Amplitudes of motions: 0.5,1.0,2.0,3.0cm in superior-inferior direction with breathing-cycle time of 6,5,4,6sec, respectively used.4D-CTs with 10-phases(0%to90%)for each excursion-set and 3D-CT for static-phantom exported to iPlan treatment-planningsystem( TPS).Tumor-volumes delineated in all phases of 4D-CT, MIP,AIP,CBCT scans using fixed-HU-threshold(−500to1000)values automatically.For each 4D-dataset ITV obtained by unifying the tumorcontours on all phases.CBCT-ITV-volumes were drawn in Eclipse-TPS. Results: Mean volume of tumor contours for all phases compared with static 3D-CT were 0.62±0.08%, 1.67±0.26%, 4.77±0.54% and 9.27±1.23% for 0.5cm,1cm,2cm,3cm excursions respectively. Differences of mean Union-ITV with MIP-ITV were close(≤2.4%).Mean Union-ITV from expected-theoretical values differed from −4.9% to 3.8%.Union-ITV and MIP-ITV were closer within 2.3%. AIP-ITVs were underestimated from 14 to 32% compared to union-ITV for all motion datasets. Differences of −5.9% to −44% and −5% to 6.7% for CBCT-ITV from MIP-ITV and AIP-ITV respectively.Motion excursions and centroid positions were within 2mm for 4D-CT and CBCT-ITVs to that of expected values. Conclusion: 4D-CT MIP-ITV and Union-ITV showed very good agreement that validates that ITV can be fast contoured on MIP.Contouring ITV in AIP must be avoided as it significantly underestimates the volume with all excursions. Free breathing CBCT-ITV showed good agreement with AIP-ITV but underestimated the MIP-ITV. Estimation of excursions and centroid values for 4D-CT and CBCT were in good agreement with expected values.« less