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Title: SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration

Abstract

Purpose: Accounting for tumor motion during radiation therapy is important to ensure that the tumor receives the prescribed dose. Increasing the field size to account for this motion exposes the surrounding healthy tissues to unnecessary radiation. In contrast to using motion-encompassing techniques to treat moving tumors, conformal radiation therapy (RT) uses a smaller field to track the tumor and adapts the beam aperture according to the motion detected. This work investigates and compares the performance of three markerless, EPID based, optical flow methods to track tumor motion with conformal RT. Methods: Three techniques were used to track the motions of a 3D printed lung tumor programmed to move according to the tumor of seven lung cancer patients. These techniques utilized a multi-resolution optical flow algorithm as the core computation for image registration. The first method (DIR) registers the incoming images with an initial reference frame, while the second method (RFSF) uses an adaptive reference frame and the third method (CU) uses preceding image frames for registration. The patient traces and errors were evaluated for the seven patients. Results: The average position errors for all patient traces were 0.12 ± 0.33 mm, −0.05 ± 0.04 mm and −0.28 ± 0.44 mmmore » for CU, DIR and RFSF method respectively. The position errors distributed within 1 standard deviation are 0.74 mm, 0.37 mm and 0.96 mm respectively. The CU and RFSF algorithms are sensitive to the characteristics of the patient trace and produce a wider distribution of errors amongst patients. Although the mean error for the DIR method is negatively biased (−0.05 mm) for all patients, it has the narrowest distribution of position error, which can be corrected using an offset calibration. Conclusion: Three techniques of image registration and position update were studied. Using direct comparison with an initial frame yields the best performance. The authors would like to thank Dr.YeLin Suh for making the Cyberknife dataset available to us. Scholarship funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and CancerCare Manitoba Foundation is acknowledged.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494079
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; ANIMAL TISSUES; CALCULATION METHODS; CALIBRATION; ERRORS; IMAGES; LUNGS; MANITOBA; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Teo, P, Guo, K, Alayoubi, N, Kehler, K, and Pistorius, S. SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924145.
Teo, P, Guo, K, Alayoubi, N, Kehler, K, & Pistorius, S. SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924145.
Teo, P, Guo, K, Alayoubi, N, Kehler, K, and Pistorius, S. Mon . "SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924145.
@article{osti_22494079,
title = {SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration},
author = {Teo, P and Guo, K and Alayoubi, N and Kehler, K and Pistorius, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Accounting for tumor motion during radiation therapy is important to ensure that the tumor receives the prescribed dose. Increasing the field size to account for this motion exposes the surrounding healthy tissues to unnecessary radiation. In contrast to using motion-encompassing techniques to treat moving tumors, conformal radiation therapy (RT) uses a smaller field to track the tumor and adapts the beam aperture according to the motion detected. This work investigates and compares the performance of three markerless, EPID based, optical flow methods to track tumor motion with conformal RT. Methods: Three techniques were used to track the motions of a 3D printed lung tumor programmed to move according to the tumor of seven lung cancer patients. These techniques utilized a multi-resolution optical flow algorithm as the core computation for image registration. The first method (DIR) registers the incoming images with an initial reference frame, while the second method (RFSF) uses an adaptive reference frame and the third method (CU) uses preceding image frames for registration. The patient traces and errors were evaluated for the seven patients. Results: The average position errors for all patient traces were 0.12 ± 0.33 mm, −0.05 ± 0.04 mm and −0.28 ± 0.44 mm for CU, DIR and RFSF method respectively. The position errors distributed within 1 standard deviation are 0.74 mm, 0.37 mm and 0.96 mm respectively. The CU and RFSF algorithms are sensitive to the characteristics of the patient trace and produce a wider distribution of errors amongst patients. Although the mean error for the DIR method is negatively biased (−0.05 mm) for all patients, it has the narrowest distribution of position error, which can be corrected using an offset calibration. Conclusion: Three techniques of image registration and position update were studied. Using direct comparison with an initial frame yields the best performance. The authors would like to thank Dr.YeLin Suh for making the Cyberknife dataset available to us. Scholarship funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and CancerCare Manitoba Foundation is acknowledged.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924145},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Adaptive radiotherapy requires complete new sets of regions of interests (ROIs) delineation on the mid-treatment CT images. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of the RayStation hybrid deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm for its overall integrity and accuracy in contour propagation for adaptive planning. Methods: The hybrid DIR is based on the combination of intensity-based algorithm and anatomical information provided by contours. Patients who received mid-treatment CT scans were identified for the study, including six lung patients (two mid-treatment CTs) and six head-and-neck (HN) patients (one mid-treatment CT). DIRpropagated ROIs were compared with physician-drawn ROIs for 8 ITVsmore » and 7 critical organs (lungs, heart, esophagus, and etc.) for the lung patients, as well as 14 GTVs and 20 critical organs (mandible, eyes, parotids, and etc.) for the HN patients. Volume difference, center of mass (COM) difference, and Dice index were used for evaluation. Clinical-relevance of each propagated ROI was scored by two physicians, and correlated with the Dice index. Results: For critical organs, good agreement (Dice>0.9) were seen on all 7 for lung patients and 13 out of 20 for HN patients, with the rest requiring minimal edits. For targets, COM differences were within 5 mm on average for all patients. For Lung, 5 out of 8 ITVs required minimal edits (Dice 0.8–0.9), with the rest 2 needed re-drawn due to their small volumes (<10 cc). However, the propagated HN GTVs resulted in relatively low Dice values (0.5–0.8) due to their small volumes (3–40 cc) and high variability, among which 2 required re-drawn due to new nodal target identified on the mid-treatment CT scans. Conclusion: The hybrid DIR algorithm was found to be clinically useful and efficient for lung and HN patients, especially for propagated critical organ ROIs. It has potential to significantly improve the workflow in adaptive planning.« less
  • Purposes: To systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during head-and-neck (H'N) radiation therapy using a GPU-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods: Eleven H'N IMRT patients comprised the subject population. The daily megavoltage CT and weekly kVCT scans were acquired for each patient. The pre-treatment CTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CT through an in-house GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure was computed to account for non-rigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant for the PTVs and critical structures was used to quantify anatomical volume changes. Dose accumulation was performed tomore » determine the actual delivered dose and dose accumulation. A landmark tool was developed to determine the uncertainty in the dose distribution due to registration error. Results: Dramatic interfraction anatomic changes leading to dosimetric variations were observed. During the treatment courses of 6–7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, the center-of-mass displacement of the two parotids varied in the range of 0.9–8.8mm. Mean doses were within 5% and 3% of the planned mean doses for all PTVs and CTVs, respectively. The cumulative minimum/mean/EUD doses were lower than the planned doses by 18%, 2%, and 7%, respectively for the PTV1. The ratio of the averaged cumulative cord maximum doses to the plan was 1.06±0.15. The cumulative mean doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left-parotid (p=0.03) and right-parotid gland (p=0.006). The computation time was nearly real-time (∼ 45 seconds) for registering each pre-treatment CT to the planning CT and dose accumulation with registration accuracy (for kVCT) at sub-voxel level (<1.5mm). Conclusions: Real-time assessment of anatomic and dosimetric variations is feasible using the GPU-based DIR framework. Clinical implementation of this technology may enable timely plan adaption and potentially lead to improved outcome.« less
  • Purpose For certain highly conformal treatment techniques, changes in patient anatomy due to weight loss and/or tumor shrinkage can result in significant changes in dose distribution. Recently, the Pinnacle treatment planning system added a Dynamic Planning module utilizing Deformable Image Registration (DIR). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this software in adapting to altered anatomy and adjusting treatment plans to account for it. Methods We simulated significant tumor response by changing patient thickness and altered chin positions using a commercially-available head and neck (H and N) phantom. In addition, we studied 23 CT image setsmore » of fifteen (15) patients with H and N tumors and eight (8) patients with prostate cancer. In each case, we applied deformable image registration through Dynamic Planning module of our Pinnacle Treatment Planning System. The dose distribution of the original CT image set was compared to the newly computed dose without altering any treatment parameter. Result was a dose if we did not adjust the plan to reflect anatomical changes. Results For the H and N phantom, a tumor response of up to 3.5 cm was correctly deformed by the Pinnacle Dynamic module. Recomputed isodose contours on new anatomies were within 1 mm of the expected distribution. The Pinnacle system configuration allowed dose computations resulting from original plans on new anatomies without leaving the planning system. Original and new doses were available side-by-side with both CT image sets. Based on DIR, about 75% of H and N patients (11/15) required a re-plan using new anatomy. Among prostate patients, the DIR predicted near-correct bladder volume in 62% of the patients (5/8). Conclusions The Dynamic Planning module of the Pinnacle system proved to be an accurate and useful tool in our ability to adapt to changes in patient anatomy during a course of radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the performance variations in commercial deformable image registration (DIR) tools for adaptive radiation therapy. Methods: Representative plans from three different anatomical sites, prostate, head-and-neck (HN) and cranial spinal irradiation (CSI) with L-spine boost, were included. Computerized deformed CT images were first generated using virtual DIR QA software (ImSimQA) for each case. The corresponding transformations served as the “reference”. Three commercial software packages MIMVista v5.5 and MIMMaestro v6.0, VelocityAI v2.6.2, and OnQ rts v2.1.15 were tested. The warped contours and doses were compared with the “reference” and among each other. Results: The performance in transferring contours was comparablemore » among all three tools with an average DICE coefficient of 0.81 for all the organs. However, the performance of dose warping accuracy appeared to rely on the evaluation end points. Volume based DVH comparisons were not sensitive enough to illustrate all the detailed variations while isodose assessment on a slice-by-slice basis could be tedious. Point-based evaluation was over-sensitive by having up to 30% hot/cold-spot differences. If adapting the 3mm/3% gamma analysis into the evaluation of dose warping, all three algorithms presented a reasonable level of equivalency. One algorithm had over 10% of the voxels not meeting this criterion for the HN case while another showed disagreement for the CSI case. Conclusion: Overall, our results demonstrated that evaluation based only on the performance of contour transformation could not guarantee the accuracy in dose warping. However, the performance of dose warping accuracy relied on the evaluation methodologies. Nevertheless, as more DIR tools are available for clinical use, the performance could vary at certain degrees. A standard quality assurance criterion with clinical meaning should be established for DIR QA, similar to the gamma index concept, in the near future.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was alsomore » evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF-based system provides accurate target positioning for frameless image-guided cranial stereotactic radiosurgery.« less