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Title: SU-E-J-36: Comparison of CBCT Image Quality for Manufacturer Default Imaging Modes

Abstract

Purpose CBCT is being increasingly used in patient setup for radiotherapy. Often the manufacturer default scan modes are used for performing these CBCT scans with the assumption that they are the best options. To quantitatively assess the image quality of these scan modes, all of the scan modes were tested as well as options with the reconstruction algorithm. Methods A CatPhan 504 phantom was scanned on a TrueBeam Linear Accelerator using the manufacturer scan modes (FSRT Head, Head, Image Gently, Pelvis, Pelvis Obese, Spotlight, & Thorax). The Head mode scan was then reconstructed multiple times with all filter options (Smooth, Standard, Sharp, & Ultra Sharp) and all Ring Suppression options (Disabled, Weak, Medium, & Strong). An open source ImageJ tool was created for analyzing the CatPhan 504 images. Results The MTF curve was primarily dictated by the voxel size and the filter used in the reconstruction algorithm. The filters also impact the image noise. The CNR was worst for the Image Gently mode, followed by FSRT Head and Head. The sharper the filter, the worse the CNR. HU varied significantly between scan modes. Pelvis Obese had lower than expected HU values than most while the Image Gently mode had highermore » than expected HU values. If a therapist tried to use preset window and level settings, they would not show the desired tissue for some scan modes. Conclusion Knowing the image quality of the set scan modes, will enable users to better optimize their setup CBCT. Evaluation of the scan mode image quality could improve setup efficiency and lead to better treatment outcomes.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494062
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALGORITHMS; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CHEST; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; HEAD; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PELVIS; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Nelson, G. SU-E-J-36: Comparison of CBCT Image Quality for Manufacturer Default Imaging Modes. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924123.
Nelson, G. SU-E-J-36: Comparison of CBCT Image Quality for Manufacturer Default Imaging Modes. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924123.
Nelson, G. Mon . "SU-E-J-36: Comparison of CBCT Image Quality for Manufacturer Default Imaging Modes". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924123.
@article{osti_22494062,
title = {SU-E-J-36: Comparison of CBCT Image Quality for Manufacturer Default Imaging Modes},
author = {Nelson, G},
abstractNote = {Purpose CBCT is being increasingly used in patient setup for radiotherapy. Often the manufacturer default scan modes are used for performing these CBCT scans with the assumption that they are the best options. To quantitatively assess the image quality of these scan modes, all of the scan modes were tested as well as options with the reconstruction algorithm. Methods A CatPhan 504 phantom was scanned on a TrueBeam Linear Accelerator using the manufacturer scan modes (FSRT Head, Head, Image Gently, Pelvis, Pelvis Obese, Spotlight, & Thorax). The Head mode scan was then reconstructed multiple times with all filter options (Smooth, Standard, Sharp, & Ultra Sharp) and all Ring Suppression options (Disabled, Weak, Medium, & Strong). An open source ImageJ tool was created for analyzing the CatPhan 504 images. Results The MTF curve was primarily dictated by the voxel size and the filter used in the reconstruction algorithm. The filters also impact the image noise. The CNR was worst for the Image Gently mode, followed by FSRT Head and Head. The sharper the filter, the worse the CNR. HU varied significantly between scan modes. Pelvis Obese had lower than expected HU values than most while the Image Gently mode had higher than expected HU values. If a therapist tried to use preset window and level settings, they would not show the desired tissue for some scan modes. Conclusion Knowing the image quality of the set scan modes, will enable users to better optimize their setup CBCT. Evaluation of the scan mode image quality could improve setup efficiency and lead to better treatment outcomes.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924123},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was alsomore » evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF-based system provides accurate target positioning for frameless image-guided cranial stereotactic radiosurgery.« less
  • Purpose: The objective of this study is to propose an alternative QA technique that analyzes imaging quality(IQ) in CBCT-QA processing. Methods: A catphan phantom was used to take CT imaging data set that were imported into a treatment planning system - Eclipse. The image quality was analyzed in terms of in-slice geometry resolution, Hounsfield numbers(HU) accuracy, mean-slice thickness, edge-to-center uniformity, low contrast resolution, and high contrast spatial resolution in Eclipse workstation. The CBCT-QA was also analyzed by OBI-workstation and a commercial software. Comparison was made to evaluation feasibility in a TPS environment. Results: The analysis of IQ was conducted inmore » Eclipse v10.0 TPS. In-slice geometric resolution was measured between 2-rods in section CTP404 and repeated for all 4 rods with the difference between expected and measured values less than +/−0.1 cm. For HU, the difference between expected and measured values in HU was found much less than +/−40. Mean slice thickness measured by a distance on the wire proportional to scanner increment multiplying by a factor of 0.42. After repeating measurements to 4 wires, the average difference between expected and measured values was less +/−0.124 mm in slice thickness. HU uniformity was measured in section CTP486 with the tolerance less than +/−40 HU. Low contrast resolution in section CTP515 and high contrast resolution in section CTP528 were found to be 7 disks in diameter of 4 mm and 6 lp/cm, respectively. Eclipse TPS results indicated a good agreement to those obtained in OBI workstation and ImagePro software for major parameters. Conclusion: An analysis of IQ was proposed as an alternative CBCT QA processing. Based upon measured data assessment, proposed method was accurate and consistent to IQ evaluation and TG142 guideline. The approach was to utilize TPS resource, which can be valuable to re-planning, verification, and delivery in adaptive therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the effects of scanning parameters and respiratory patterns on the image quality for 4-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography(4D-CBCT) imaging, and assess the accuracy of computed tumor trajectory for lung imaging using registration of phased 4D-CBCT imaging with treatment planning-CT. Methods: We simulated a periodic and non-sinusoidal respirations with various breathing periods and amplitudes using a respiratory phantom(Quasar, Modus Medical Devices Inc) to acquire respiration-correlated 4D-CBCT images. 4D-CBCT scans(Elekta Oncology Systems Ltd) were performed with different scanning parameters for collimation size(e.g., small and medium field-of-views) and scanning speed(e.g., slow 50°·min{sup −1}, fast 100°·min{sup −1}). Using a standard CBCT-QA phantom(Catphan500,more » The Phantom Laboratory), the image qualities of all phases in 4D-CBCT were evaluated with contrast-to-noise ratio(CNR) for lung tissue and uniformity in each module. Using a respiratory phantom, the target imaging in 4D-CBCT was compared to 3D-CBCT target image. The target trajectory from 10-respiratory phases in 4D-CBCT was extracted using an automatic image registration and subsequently assessed the accuracy by comparing with actual motion of the target. Results: Image analysis indicated that a short respiration with a small amplitude resulted in superior CNR and uniformity. Smaller variation of CNR and uniformity was present amongst different respiratory phases. The small field-of-view with a partial scan using slow scan can improve CNR, but degraded uniformity. Large amplitude of respiration can degrade image quality. RMS of voxel densities in tumor area of 4D-CBCT images between sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal motion exhibited no significant difference. The maximum displacement errors of motion trajectories were less than 1.0 mm and 13.5 mm, for sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal breathings, respectively. The accuracy of motion reconstruction showed good overall agreement with the 4D-CBCT image quality results only using sinusoidal breathings. Conclusion: This information can be used to determine the appropriate acquisition parameters of 4D-CBCT imaging for registration accuracy and target trajectory measurements in a clinical setting.« less
  • Purpose: Vertical stacking of four conventional EPID layers can improve DQE for MV-CBCT applications. We hypothesize that shifting each layer laterally by half a pixel relative to the layer above, will improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image resolution. Methods: For CNR assessment, a 20 cm diameter digital phantom with 8 inserts is created. The attenuation coefficient of the phantom is similar to lung at the average energy of a 6 MV photon beam. The inserts have attenuations 1, 2…8 times of lung. One of the inserts is close to soft tissue, resembling the case of a tumor in lung.more » For resolution assessment, a digital phantom featuring a bar pattern is created. The phantom has an attenuation coefficient similar to soft tissue and the bars have an attenuation coefficient of calcium sulfate. A 2 MeV photon beam is attenuated through these phantoms and hits each of the four stacked detector layers. Each successive layer is shifted by half a pixel in the x only, y only, and x and y (combined) directions, respectively. Blurring and statistical noise are added to the projections. Projections from one, two, three and four layers are used for reconstruction. CNR and image resolution are evaluated and compared. Results: When projections from multiple layers are combined for reconstruction, CNR increases with the number of layers involved. CNR in reconstructions from two, three and four layers are 1.4, 1.7 and 1.99 times that from one layer. The resolution from the shifted four layer detector is also improved from a single layer. In a comparison between one layer versus four layers in this preliminary study, the resolution from four shifted layers is at least 20% better. Conclusion: Layer-shifting in a stacked EPID imager design enhances resolution as well as CNR for half scan MV-CBCT. The project described was supported, in part, by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc., and Award No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Cancer Institute or the National Institutes of Health.« less
  • Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) is used routinely in the clinic without a formalized quality assurance (QA) process. Using simulated deformations to digitally deform images in a known way and comparing to DIR algorithm predictions is a powerful technique for DIR QA. This technique must also simulate realistic image noise and artifacts, especially between modalities. This study developed an algorithm to create simulated daily kV cone-beam computed-tomography (CBCT) images from CT images for DIR QA between these modalities. Methods: A Catphan and physical head-and-neck phantom, with known deformations, were used. CT and kV-CBCT images of the Catphan were utilized tomore » characterize the changes in Hounsfield units, noise, and image cupping that occur between these imaging modalities. The algorithm then imprinted these changes onto a CT image of the deformed head-and-neck phantom, thereby creating a simulated-CBCT image. CT and kV-CBCT images of the undeformed and deformed head-and-neck phantom were also acquired. The Velocity and MIM DIR algorithms were applied between the undeformed CT image and each of the deformed CT, CBCT, and simulated-CBCT images to obtain predicted deformations. The error between the known and predicted deformations was used as a metric to evaluate the quality of the simulated-CBCT image. Ideally, the simulated-CBCT image registration would produce the same accuracy as the deformed CBCT image registration. Results: For Velocity, the mean error was 1.4 mm for the CT-CT registration, 1.7 mm for the CT-CBCT registration, and 1.4 mm for the CT-simulated-CBCT registration. These same numbers were 1.5, 4.5, and 5.9 mm, respectively, for MIM. Conclusion: All cases produced similar accuracy for Velocity. MIM produced similar values of accuracy for CT-CT registration, but was not as accurate for CT-CBCT registrations. The MIM simulated-CBCT registration followed this same trend, but overestimated MIM DIR errors relative to the CT-CBCT registration.« less