skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-E-J-22: A Feasibility Study On KV-Based Whole Breast Radiation Patient Setup

Abstract

Purpose: In room kilovoltage x-ray (kV) imaging provides higher contrast than Megavoltage (MV) imaging with faster acquisition time compared with on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), thus improving patient setup accuracy and efficiency. In this study we evaluated the clinical feasibility of utilizing kV imaging for whole breast radiation patient setup. Methods: For six breast cancer patients with whole breast treatment plans using two opposed tangential fields, MV-based patient setup was conducted by aligning patient markers with in room lasers and MV portal images. Beam-eye viewed kV images were acquired using Varian OBI system after the set up process. In house software was developed to transfer MLC blocks information overlaying onto kV images to demonstrate the field shape for verification. KV-based patient digital shift was derived by performing rigid registration between kV image and the digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) to align the bony structure. This digital shift between kV-based and MV-based setup was defined as setup deviation. Results: Six sets of kV images were acquired for breast patients. The mean setup deviation was 2.3mm, 2.2mm and 1.8mm for anterior-posterior, superior-inferior and left-right direction respectively. The average setup deviation magnitude was 4.3±1.7mm for six patients. Patient with large breast had a largermore » setup deviation (4.4–6.2mm). There was no strong correlation between MV-based shift and setup deviation. Conclusion: A preliminary clinical workflow for kV-based whole breast radiation setup was established and tested. We observed setup deviation of the magnitude below than 5mm. With the benefit of providing higher contrast and MLC block overlaid on the images for treatment field verification, it is feasible to use kV imaging for breast patient setup.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
  2. Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494049
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ACCURACY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; VERIFICATION

Citation Formats

Huang, Q, Zhang, M, Yue, N, and Chen, T. SU-E-J-22: A Feasibility Study On KV-Based Whole Breast Radiation Patient Setup. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924109.
Huang, Q, Zhang, M, Yue, N, & Chen, T. SU-E-J-22: A Feasibility Study On KV-Based Whole Breast Radiation Patient Setup. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924109.
Huang, Q, Zhang, M, Yue, N, and Chen, T. Mon . "SU-E-J-22: A Feasibility Study On KV-Based Whole Breast Radiation Patient Setup". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924109.
@article{osti_22494049,
title = {SU-E-J-22: A Feasibility Study On KV-Based Whole Breast Radiation Patient Setup},
author = {Huang, Q and Zhang, M and Yue, N and Chen, T},
abstractNote = {Purpose: In room kilovoltage x-ray (kV) imaging provides higher contrast than Megavoltage (MV) imaging with faster acquisition time compared with on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), thus improving patient setup accuracy and efficiency. In this study we evaluated the clinical feasibility of utilizing kV imaging for whole breast radiation patient setup. Methods: For six breast cancer patients with whole breast treatment plans using two opposed tangential fields, MV-based patient setup was conducted by aligning patient markers with in room lasers and MV portal images. Beam-eye viewed kV images were acquired using Varian OBI system after the set up process. In house software was developed to transfer MLC blocks information overlaying onto kV images to demonstrate the field shape for verification. KV-based patient digital shift was derived by performing rigid registration between kV image and the digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) to align the bony structure. This digital shift between kV-based and MV-based setup was defined as setup deviation. Results: Six sets of kV images were acquired for breast patients. The mean setup deviation was 2.3mm, 2.2mm and 1.8mm for anterior-posterior, superior-inferior and left-right direction respectively. The average setup deviation magnitude was 4.3±1.7mm for six patients. Patient with large breast had a larger setup deviation (4.4–6.2mm). There was no strong correlation between MV-based shift and setup deviation. Conclusion: A preliminary clinical workflow for kV-based whole breast radiation setup was established and tested. We observed setup deviation of the magnitude below than 5mm. With the benefit of providing higher contrast and MLC block overlaid on the images for treatment field verification, it is feasible to use kV imaging for breast patient setup.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924109},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in termsmore » of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain.« less
  • Purpose: CBCT is the current gold standard to verify prone breast patient setup. We investigated in a phantom if non-ionizing localization systems can replace ionizing localization systems for prone breast treatments. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was positioned on a prone breast board. Electromagnetic transponders were attached on the left chest surface. The CT images of the phantom were imported to the treatment planning system. The isocenter was set to the center of the transponders. The positions of the isocenter and transponders transferred to the transponder tracking system. The posterior phantom surface was contoured and exported to the optical surface trackingmore » system. A CBCT was taken for the initial setup alignment on the treatment machine. Using the electromagnetic and optical localization systems, the deviation of the phantom setup from the original CT images was measured. This was compared with the difference between the original CT and kV-CBCT images. Results: For the electromagnetic localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 1.5 mm, 0.0 mm and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) directions. For the optical localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 2.0 mm, −2.0 mm and 0.1 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. For the CBCT, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 4.0 mm, 1.0 mm and −1.0 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. The measured values from the non-ionizing localization systems differed from those with the CBCT less than 3.0 mm in all directions. Conclusions: This phantom study showed the feasibility of using a combination of non-ionizing localization systems to achieve a similar setup accuracy as CBCT for prone breast patients. This could potentially eliminate imaging dose. As a next step, we are expanding this study to actual patients. This work has been in part supported by Departmental Research Award RODEPT1-JS001, Department of Radiation Oncology, UC Davis Medical Center.« less
  • Purpose: Optical surface imaging has been applied to radiation therapy patient setup. This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the surface registration of the optical surface imaging compared with that of the conventional method of volumetric registration for patient setup in head and neck radiation therapy. Methods: Clinical datasets of planning CT and treatment Cone Beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare the surface and volumetric registrations in radiation therapy patient setup. The Iterative Closest Points based on point-plane closest method was implemented for surface registration. We employed 3D Slicer for rigid volumetric registration of planning CT and treatmentmore » CBCT. 6 parameters of registration results (3 rotations and 3 translations) were obtained by the two registration methods, and the results were compared. Digital simulation tests in ideal cases were also performed to validate each registration method. Results: Digital simulation tests showed that both of the registration methods were accurate and robust enough to compare the registration results. In experiments with the actual clinical data, the results showed considerable deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations. The average root mean squared translational error was 2.7 mm and the maximum translational error was 5.2 mm. Conclusion: The deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations was considerable. Special caution should be taken in using an optical surface imaging. To ensure the accuracy of optical surface imaging in radiation therapy patient setup, additional measures are required. This research was supported in part by the KIST institutional program (2E24551), the Industrial Strategic technology development program (10035495) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE, KOREA), and the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission, and the NIH (R01EB016777)« less
  • Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to definemore » different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the role of 2D kilovoltage (kV) imaging to complement cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging in a shift threshold based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) strategy for conventional lung radiotherapy. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted by analyzing IGRT couch shift trends for 15 patients that received lung radiation therapy to evaluate the benefit of performing orthogonal kV imaging prior to CBCT imaging. Herein, a shift threshold based IGRT protocol was applied, which would mandate additional CBCT verification if the applied patient shifts exceeded 3 mm to avoid intraobserver variability in CBCT registration and to confirm table shifts.more » For each patient, two IGRT strategies: kV + CBCT and CBCT alone, were compared and the recorded patient shifts were categorized into whether additional CBCT acquisition would have been mandated or not. The effectiveness of either strategy was gauged by the likelihood of needing additional CBCT imaging for accurate patient set-up. Results: The use of CBCT alone was 6 times more likely to require an additional CBCT than KV+CBCT, for a 3 mm shift threshold (88% vs 14%). The likelihood of additional CBCT verification generally increased with lower shift thresholds, and was significantly lower when kV+CBCT was used (7% with 5 mm shift threshold, 36% with 2 mm threshold), than with CBCT alone (61% with 5 mm shift threshold, 97% with 2 mm threshold). With CBCT alone, treatment time increased by 2.2 min and dose increased by 1.9 cGy per fraction on average due to additional CBCT with a 3mm shift threshold. Conclusion: The benefit of kV imaging to screen for gross misalignments led to more accurate CBCT based patient localization compared with using CBCT alone. The subsequently reduced need for additional CBCT verification will minimize treatment time and result in less overall patient imaging dose.« less