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Title: SU-E-I-88: The Effect of System Dead Time On Real-Time Plastic and GOS Based Fiber-Optic Dosimetry Systems

Abstract

Purpose: A methodology is presented to correct for measurement inaccuracies at high detector count rates using a plastic and GOS scintillation fibers coupled to a photomultiplier tube with digital readout. This system allows temporal acquisition and manipulation of measured data. Methods: The detection system used was a plastic scintillator and a separate gadolinium scintillator, both (0.5 diameter) coupled to an optical fiber with a Hamamatsu photon counter with a built-in microcontroller and digital interface. Count rate performance of the system was evaluated using the nonparalzable detector model. Detector response was investigated across multiple radiation sources including: orthovoltage x-ray system, colbat-60 gamma rays, proton therapy beam, and a diagnostic radiography x-ray tube. The dead time parameter was calculated by measuring the count rate of the system at different exposure rates using a reference detector. Results: The system dead time was evaluated for the following sources of radiation used clinically: diagnostic energy x-rays, cobalt-60 gamma rays, orthovoltage xrays, particle proton accelerator, and megavoltage x-rays. It was found that dead time increased significantly when exposing the detector to sources capable of generating Cerenkov radiation, all of the sources sans the diagnostic x-rays, with increasing prominence at higher photon energies. Percent depth dose curvesmore » generated by a dedicated ionization chamber and compared to the detection system demonstrated that correcting for dead time improves accuracy. On most sources, nonparalzable model fit provided an improved system response. Conclusion: Overall, the system dead time was variable across the investigated radiation particles and energies. It was demonstrated that the system response accuracy was greatly improved by correcting for dead time effects. Cerenkov radiation plays a significant role in the increase in the system dead time through transient absorption effects attributed to electron hole-pair creations within the optical waveguide.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22494030
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CHERENKOV RADIATION; COBALT 60; COUNTING RATES; DEAD TIME; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; GADOLINIUM; GAMMA RADIATION; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; OPTICAL FIBERS; PAIR PRODUCTION; PHOTONS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY; X-RAY TUBES

Citation Formats

Hoerner, M, and Hintenlang, D. SU-E-I-88: The Effect of System Dead Time On Real-Time Plastic and GOS Based Fiber-Optic Dosimetry Systems. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4924085.
Hoerner, M, & Hintenlang, D. SU-E-I-88: The Effect of System Dead Time On Real-Time Plastic and GOS Based Fiber-Optic Dosimetry Systems. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924085.
Hoerner, M, and Hintenlang, D. Mon . "SU-E-I-88: The Effect of System Dead Time On Real-Time Plastic and GOS Based Fiber-Optic Dosimetry Systems". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4924085.
@article{osti_22494030,
title = {SU-E-I-88: The Effect of System Dead Time On Real-Time Plastic and GOS Based Fiber-Optic Dosimetry Systems},
author = {Hoerner, M and Hintenlang, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: A methodology is presented to correct for measurement inaccuracies at high detector count rates using a plastic and GOS scintillation fibers coupled to a photomultiplier tube with digital readout. This system allows temporal acquisition and manipulation of measured data. Methods: The detection system used was a plastic scintillator and a separate gadolinium scintillator, both (0.5 diameter) coupled to an optical fiber with a Hamamatsu photon counter with a built-in microcontroller and digital interface. Count rate performance of the system was evaluated using the nonparalzable detector model. Detector response was investigated across multiple radiation sources including: orthovoltage x-ray system, colbat-60 gamma rays, proton therapy beam, and a diagnostic radiography x-ray tube. The dead time parameter was calculated by measuring the count rate of the system at different exposure rates using a reference detector. Results: The system dead time was evaluated for the following sources of radiation used clinically: diagnostic energy x-rays, cobalt-60 gamma rays, orthovoltage xrays, particle proton accelerator, and megavoltage x-rays. It was found that dead time increased significantly when exposing the detector to sources capable of generating Cerenkov radiation, all of the sources sans the diagnostic x-rays, with increasing prominence at higher photon energies. Percent depth dose curves generated by a dedicated ionization chamber and compared to the detection system demonstrated that correcting for dead time improves accuracy. On most sources, nonparalzable model fit provided an improved system response. Conclusion: Overall, the system dead time was variable across the investigated radiation particles and energies. It was demonstrated that the system response accuracy was greatly improved by correcting for dead time effects. Cerenkov radiation plays a significant role in the increase in the system dead time through transient absorption effects attributed to electron hole-pair creations within the optical waveguide.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4924085},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}
  • Purpose: We had developed and evaluated a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) which can measure a percent depth dose (PDD) instantly. In this study, the Bragg peaks and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the proton beams measured by FOCRS array were compared with those measured by an ion chamber. Methods and Method: We fabricated an optical fiber array of FOCRS in a handmade phantom which is composed of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). There are 75 holes of 1mm diameter inside the phantom which is designed to be exposed in direction ofmore » beam when it is emerged in water phantom. The proton beam irradiation was carried out using IBA cyclotron PROTEUS 235 at national cancer center in Korea and a commercial data acquisition system was used to digitize the analog signal. Results: The measured Bragg peak and SOBP for the proton ranges of 7∼ 20 cm were well matched with the result from ion chamber. The comparison results show that the depth of proton beam ranges and the width of SOBP measured by array of FOCRS are comparable with the measurement from multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) although there are some uncertainty in the measurement of FOCRS array for some specific beam ranges. Conclusion: The newly developed FOCRS array based dosimetric system for proton therapy can efficiently reduce the time and effort needed for proton beam range measurement compared to the conventional method and has the potential to be used for the proton pencil beam application.« less
  • Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to design a prototype for couch-based based real time dosimetry system in external beam radiotherapy Methods: A prototype of 100 ionization chambers was designed on a printed circuit board by etching the copper layer and each ionization chamber was wired to a 50 pin connector. The signals from the two 50 pin connectors collected from the ionization chambers were then transferred to a PXI module from National Instruments. The PXI module houses a current amplifier that amplifies the charge collected from the ionization chamber. The amplified signal is then sent to amore » digital multimeter module for converting the analog signal to digital signal. A software was designed in labview to read and display the signals obtained from the PXI module. A couch attachment frame was designed to house the 100 ionization chamber module. The frame was fixed underneath the treatment couch for measuring the dose during treatment. Resutls: The ionization chamber based prototype dosimetry was tested for simple radiotherapy treatment fields and found to be a useful device for measuring real time dosimetry at the treatment couch plane. This information could be used to assess the delivered dose to a patient during radiotherapy. It could be used as an invivo dosimeter during radiotherapy. Conclusion: In this study, a prototype for couch based real time dosimetry system was designed and tested. The prototype forms a basis for the development of large scale couch based real time dosimetry system that could be used to perform morning QA prior to treatment, assess real time doses delivered to patient and as a device to monitor the output of the treatment beam. Peter MacCallum Cancer Foundation.« less
  • Purpose: A pixel correction map is applied to all EPID-based applications on the TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). When dead pixels are detected, an interpolative smoothing algorithm is applied using neighboring-pixel information to supplement missing-pixel information. The vendor suggests that when the number of dead pixels exceeds 70,000, the panel should be replaced. It is common for entire detector rows to be dead, as well as their neighboring rows. Approximately 70 rows can be dead before the panel reaches this threshold. This study determines the number of neighboring dead-pixel rows that would create a large enough deviation inmore » measured fluence to cause failures in portal dosimetry (PD). Methods: Four clinical two-arc VMAT plans were generated using Eclipse's AXB algorithm and PD plans were created using the PDIP algorithm. These plans were chosen to represent those commonly encountered in the clinic: prostate, lung, abdomen, and neck treatments. During each iteration of this study, an increasing number of dead-pixel rows are artificially applied to the correction map and a fluence QA is performed using the EPID (corrected with this map). To provide a worst-case-scenario, the dead-pixel rows are chosen so that they present artifacts in the highfluence region of the field. Results: For all eight arc-fields deemed acceptable via a 3%/3mm gamma analysis (pass rate greater than 99%), VMAT QA yielded identical results with a 5 pixel-width dead zone. When 10 dead lines were present, half of the fields had pass rates below the 99% pass rate. With increasing dead rows, the pass rates were reduced substantially. Conclusion: While the vendor still suggests to request service at the point where 70,000 dead rows are measured (as recommended by the vendor), the authors suggest that service should be requested when there are greater than 5 consecutive dead rows.« less
  • Purpose: Here, the authors describe a dosimetry measurement technique for microbeam radiation therapy using a nanoparticle-terminated fiber-optic dosimeter (nano-FOD). Methods: The nano-FOD was placed in the center of a 2 cm diameter mouse phantom to measure the deep tissue dose and lateral beam profile of a planar x-ray microbeam. Results: The continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak measured with the nano-FOD was 1.91 ± 0.06 cGy s{sup −1}, a value 2.7% higher than that determined via radiochromic film measurements (1.86 ± 0.15 cGy s{sup −1}). The nano-FOD-determined lateral beam full-width half max value of 420 μm exceeded thatmore » measured using radiochromic film (320 μm). Due to the 8° angle of the collimated microbeam and resulting volumetric effects within the scintillator, the profile measurements reported here are estimated to achieve a resolution of ∼0.1 mm; however, for a beam angle of 0°, the theoretical resolution would approach the thickness of the scintillator (∼0.01 mm). Conclusions: This work provides proof-of-concept data and demonstrates that the novel nano-FOD device can be used to perform real-time dosimetry in microbeam radiation therapy to measure the continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak as well as the lateral beam shape.« less
  • Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ∼10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECTmore » images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime loss correction while keeping the study duration reasonable.« less